Horton Hears a Who!

 

 

On the fifteenth of May, in the jungle of Nool, in the heat of the day, in the cool of the pool. He
was splashing…enjoying the jungle’s great joys…When Horton the elephant heard a small noise.

With his signature evocative and rhyming text, writer and cartoonist Dr. Seuss, an
American treasure whose books have delighted generations of young people, opens one
of his most beloved tales, Horton Hears a Who!

Now, over fifty years since Seuss, whose real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel,
published this perennial favorite, the makers of ICE AGE and comedy giants Jim Carrey
and Steve Carell, bring it to life in a way never before experienced. For the first time, a
motion picture transports audiences into Dr. Seuss’ incredible imagination, through stateof-
the-art CG animation. DR. SEUSS’ HORTON HEARS A WHO! ™ is Seuss as you
want to experience his work at the movies – and as it was meant to be seen.



The film, like Seuss’ book, presents an imaginative elephant named Horton
(Carrey) who hears a faint cry for help coming from a tiny speck of dust floating through
the air. Although Horton doesn’t know it yet, that speck houses an entire city named
Who-ville, inhabited by the microscopic Whos, led by the Mayor (Carell). Despite being
ridiculed and threatened by his neighbors, who think he has lost his mind, Horton is
determined to save the particle…because “a person’s a person, no matter how small.”

Horton’s eight-word explanation for his actions embodies an idea both simple and
profound, and which means so much, to so many. The film provides more food for
thought, having Horton explains to his skeptical friends: “If you were way out in space,
and you looked down at where we live, we would look like a speck.”

 




Then there’s Horton’s code…his motto… that, “an elephant’s faithful 100
percent” – pointing to his honesty and determination to never abandon his mission to find
a new home for the speck that houses the incredible world of Who-ville.

These philosophical declarations point to Seuss’ unique ability to take complex
issues and boil them down into understandable thoughts that anybody, at any age, could
understand.

It all comes together through the vision of a master storyteller, the magic of
computer animation, and the special alchemy of three generations of comedy stars –
Carrey and Carell are joined by the legendary Carol Burnett, as well as cutting-edge
talents Will Arnett, Isla Fisher, Amy Poehler , Seth Rogen and Jonah Hill – to create an
all-audience comedy event.



GIVING BIRTH TO HORTON (THE MOVIE)

Horton began his new journey to the big screen in 2003, when executive producer
Christopher Meledandri, then president of Twentieth Century Fox Animation, which
supervises the East Coast-based Blue Sky Studios, approached Dr. Seuss Enterprises and
the author’s wife Audrey Geisel, about creating a 3-D animated movie based on Horton
Hears a Who! Meledandri’s proposal to Audrey went far beyond simple business
interests. “Ted Geisel had one of the greatest imaginations of the twentieth century,” he
says. “His books were a seminal part of my childhood and I have always wanted to find
a way to make a digitally animated Dr. Seuss movie.”

The book’s narrative structure was of particular interest to Meledandri and Fox
Animation. “It’s one of the few Dr. Seuss books with three acts – a great beginning,
middle and end. And of course, ‘a person’s a person no matter how small’ is a wonderful
theme.”

Audrey Geisel wanted to make sure that the film adaptation be respectful of her
late husband’s book. Meledandri assuaged her concerns, pointing out to her the
considerable merits of CG animation and the proven successes of Blue Sky Studios,
whose “Ice Age” and “Ice Age: The Meltdown” created fantastical characters; and whose
“Robots” depicted a fantastical world. The films’ artistry enveloped audiences in their
environments and characters, suspending disbelief that they weren’t “real.” That same





magic, Meledandri told Audrey, would do the same for DR. SEUSS’ HORTON HEARS
A WHO!

To help close the deal, Meledandri asked Mike De Feo, head of Blue Sky’s
sculpting department, to sculpt a pivotal scene from the book, in which the Mayor holds
his son Jo-Jo above his head. As it turned out, the scene was one of Audrey’s favorites,
and she loved the sculpture. Some time later, development commenced on the first CG
animated feature film based on a work by Dr. Seuss. Horton, the Mayor, Jo-Jo, the
Kangaroo – and all the beloved characters in the jungle of Nool and in the city of Whoville
– were on their way to movie stardom.

To guide their journey, the studio tapped Jimmy Hayward and Steve Martino to
direct. They were a perfectly matched duo to bring Horton to digital life. Hayward was
an animator on the groundbreaking Pixar films “Toy Story,” “Toy Story 2,” “A Bug’s
Life,” “Monsters Inc.” and “Finding Nemo”; and a story consultant and director of
additional scenes on “Robots.” Martino, as art director on “Robots,” helped create the
first animated feature that presented a totally imagined world – a wondrously clanky
universe populated solely by mechanical beings.



Hayward and Martino’s mandate was to stay true to Seuss’ themes, characters and
visuals. They based much of the look on Seuss art taken directly from the book, while
other designs in the film are extrapolated from the author’s drawings or notes.
Additionally, the filmmakers strove to push the medium of CG animation as far as
possible, mixing old and new techniques to provide a look never before experienced in a
motion picture, yet reminiscent of the era – the 1950s – the book was published. “We
pushed everything, creating weird, fun Seussian colors and shapes, but with real
textures,” says Hayward.

In previous live action movies based on Seuss’ works, the filmmakers had to try
and get around real-world constraints in design, movement and anatomy. “We didn’t
have that problem,” says Hayward, “because this is a CG movie. For the first time in my
career, we could push the animation to all kinds of crazy places just as Seuss pushed his
work into some wildly imaginative areas.”





WHO’S WHO IN WHO-VILLE…AND WHAT’S “NOO” IN NOOL:
MEET THE CHARACTERS

Horton is not like any elephant we’ve seen before. He is bigger than life in many
ways beyond bulk; he has a big heart, big personality, and a big sense of fun. Horton
shines through kindness, trustworthiness and perseverance. Despite formidable adversity,
ridicule, condemnation and threats, Horton’s resolve to bring Who-ville to safety,
remains steadfast. He’s always faithful…100 percent.

According to the filmmakers, Jim Carrey brings far more than his superstar
comedy talents to the role of Horton. “Jim has a warmth and humor that’s amazing, and
which kept Horton that sweet, lovable character we know from the books,” says Jimmy
Hayward. “He’s a passionate, creative force and really owned the character.



“Jim really puts his entire face into everything he does,” Hayward continues. “He
acts out every take just as he would if he were actually before the cameras. He gave us
some great eye acting references, so we got an extraordinary amount of subtle Horton
stuff out of Jim from his voice performance.”

Given Carrey’s full-throttle expressiveness, it comes as no surprise that he
influenced Horton’s look. Says lead animator Dave Torres: “In early design stages,
Horton had a smaller mouth. But when Jim came aboard, the character became very
expressive; in fact, Jim led us to really push the boundaries of expressiveness for an
animated character.”

Horton’s chief relationship in the story is with the Mayor of Who-ville, whom
Horton never sees, and who cannot see him. Yet the bond they form is a remarkable one,
rich with warmth, friendship and humor, even though the stakes for both are life and
death. As Horton makes his epic journey to bring Who-ville to safety, the Mayor – the
voice of all the Whos – risks everything to convince his constituents of the dangers
ahead.

Dr. Seuss so memorably introduces the Mayor as “…devoted and fair, and a little
bit odd. The Mayor and his wife, they had children to spare.” And how! They are
proud parents to 96 daughters and one son. The endless parade of offspring is introduced
sitting on chairs attached to a conveyer belt that rotates around the table, so that each has





a brief but impactful audience with the Mayor; it’s an imaginatively patterned procession
reminiscent of a scene from a Busby Berkeley musical.

Steve Carell, says director Steve Martino, brings a sense of humanity to all his
characters, like “The Office’s” perpetually-clueless boss Michael Scott and, now, the
besieged and beleaguered Mayor. “All of Steve’s characters have a beautiful heart
inside,” says Martino. “You want to root for them.”

“You like to watch Steve’s characters struggle,” adds Jimmy Hayward.
“Watching him ‘spin plates’ – it’s a pleasure. He rubs the right amount of ‘Steve’ on
every line of dialogue. He’s the one Who we really get to know, so you want to relate to
him, and thanks to Steve, you do.”
 


Carell describes the Mayor as “kind, generous, well-intentioned, with a lot of
internal fortitude. He’s sort of an everyman – a guy just trying to do his best in a very
difficult situation.” The Golden Globe®-winning actor particularly appreciated the
philosophical underpinnings of Horton’s insisting that a person’s a person, no matter how
small. “It really speaks to the world around us – that no matter how different we seem on
the outside, if there is decency, caring and commitment, things can get accomplished.
It’s a good, sweet, and solid message that’s rooted in kindness. And that’s what I love
about it.”

The Mayor’s pride and joy is son Jo-Jo, the littlest Who. The Mayor has big plans
for his diminutive son, grooming him to continue the family legacy by taking over as
head of the Whos when the Mayor retires. But Jo-Jo has made it abundantly clear that he
does not want his father’s career. Instead, the taciturn young man is pursuing something
very, very different and special….

The chief threat to Horton’s quest – and in turn to the survival of Who-ville – is
the Kangaroo, who, as the film tells us, “made every law and enforced every rule, as self-
proclaimed head of the jungle of Nool.” She has a sour disposition and a closed mind,
insisting that “if you can’t see something, it doesn’t exist.” Kangaroo’s closed-in
philosophy has potentially grave consequences for Horton, the Mayor, and all of Whoville.


But is she a villain? Martino isn’t so sure. “She’s an ideologue, not a villain,” he
posits. “She’s misguided but not evil.”
 





In one memorable scene, the Kangaroo, in full jungle-tyrant mode, delivers –
actually, screams at the top of her lungs – a sermon about the impossibility of the
existence of Who-ville. The sequence makes full use of the amazing vocal capabilities
and comedic talents of the legendary Carol Burnett, who takes on the role, making it her
own. (Burnett’s legions of fans include Jim Carrey and many of the DR. SEUSS’
HORTON HEARS A WHO! creative and production teams.) “Carol has pipes!” says
Hayward of the actress, whose many memorable moments from her long-running
television variety show included a “Tarzan yell” that provides a foreshadowing of her
Kangaroo vocalizations. “She just lets it all hang out [delivering the sermon],” says
Burnett. “There’s something very liberating about screaming at the top of your
lungs…and getting paid for it.”

Returning to the subject of Kangaroo’s alleged villainy, Burnett points out that
“when playing a villain, you don’t see the character as villainous. A villain doesn’t think
he or she is evil. They see the good – that they’re righteous in their feelings and
thoughts. And if everybody else would just listen to and agree with them, the world will
be just wonderful.



“Kangaroo is very controlling and hard-nosed,” Burnett admits. “She runs the
jungle with an iron fist. She’s kept her son Rudy in her pouch for, well, too long; she
won’t let him out of his ‘room.’” (Some kids feel like their parents keep them prisoners;
Rudy might have a legitimate complaint.)

Kangaroo’s chief henchman is Vlad Vlad-I-Koff, an enormous, black-bottomed
eagle with tattered, oily feathers and a large jagged beak. He speaks with a thick Russian
accent. Vlad is not an evil genius – he’s just evil. “Vlad moves around like a lizard or a
bat,” says Jimmy Hayward. “Everything for him is based on instinct. The character is a
great car accident of fun cultural influences. He’s like a maroon velour-tracksuit
wearing, gold-chained gangster.”

Will Arnett (“Arrested Development”), who plays Vlad, says the character is “his
own breed of bird – a dangerous guy…a gun for hire. He’s pseudo-hip – woefully behind
the times. But he thinks he’s on top of the latest in pop culture.

“I’m attracted to characters that are slightly cocky and also pretty dumb,” Arnett
continues. “That’s a winning combination. Not for life, but for comedy. For life, it’s a





really sad combination. I love people who are super-cocky and yet totally unaware of
what an idiot they are.”

Vlad may not be the sharpest beak in the jungle, but he poses a threat to Horton
and to Who-ville. Vlad can weave in and out of trees like an X-wing fighter – you can
almost hear the jet engines – and in one thrilling sequence he chases Horton through the
jungle. “We constructed the scene like a classic horror film,” says Hayward. “It’s
certainly not bloody or played for terror. But it does present a balance of laughs and
surprises.”

The head of the Wickersham clan is Yummo, voiced by Tony®-winning actor
Dan Fogler, who doubles his fun by also taking on the role of the Who-ville Council
Chairman. Fogler enjoyed both roles but says Yummo is closer to his heart. “I’m from
Brooklyn,” he explains, “and Yummo IS Brooklyn, tough and street.”

There is no shortage of adversaries for Horton. But he does have a best friend and
confidante in Nool: Morton the Mouse, who tries to be a voice of reason to his oversized
pal. “Well, you’re talking to a clover; that doesn’t look good,” the savvy rodent advises
Horton. Seth Rogen, one of the brightest of today’s comedy actor/writers, brings his
special cockeyed sensibility to the role. “Morton may be too susceptible to peer
pressure,” says the “Knocked Up” star and “Superbad” actor-writer. “He’s somewhat
neurotic and maybe not really his own guy.”



Back in Who-ville, as the Mayor tries to convince the Whos of the dangers facing
the city, the Mayor’s wife and the level-headed mother to 97, is keeping things running
smoothly at home. The seemingly effortless way in which the character handles a
household bursting at the seams will amuse any parent; it certainly did Steve Martino.
“I’ve got two kids and that’s a challenge,” he says. “Now, imagine dealing with 97!”

“Saturday Night Live” mainstay Amy Poehler, the real-life wife to Vlad Vlad-I-
Koff himself – Will Arnett – makes the character an engaging character that calls her
husband on his frantic behavior, but always doing so with understanding and a sense of
humor. “Amy makes the character contemporary and real, but with a tongue-in-cheek
bite,” says Martino.

“I’ve played many kinds of crazy in my career,” Poehler adds. “A lot of up-anddown
characters. But Sally is very stable. She keeps her husband grounded in a very





nice way. She has to because she’s the real head of their giant family. She’s her
husband’s sounding board. But she’s a little worried about him; is he going crazy with
his frantic running around with warnings of possible doom?”

Sally’s doubts notwithstanding, there is indeed something amiss in Who-ville. To
confirm his suspicions, the Mayor turns to Dr. Mary Lou LaRue, the wacky but brainy
scientist from Who U. Dr. LaRue wears thick safety glasses, sports big purple hair and
lacks basic social skills. Everything for her is about science. Isla Fisher, who moves
effortlessly between broad comedies like “Wedding Crashers” and dramas like “The
Lookout,” notes that Mary Lou is the only Who (besides the Mayor) who “fully
understands the ramifications of Who-ville’s sudden climate changes [stemming from
Horton’s perilous journey through Nool]. She’s the first to convert to the Mayor’s beliefs
about potential doom and gloom.” Adds the diminutive star, who stands all of five-feet,
two-inches: “The saying that ‘a person’s a person no matter how small,’ has particular
relevance to me.”

From the brainy to the…not so much. Meet the Wickershams, a simian clan with
an all-too-familiar human mob mentality. “They’re essentially a band of funny guys,”
says Hayward. “They’re not classical villains. But when things start getting tough for
Horton, the Wickershams enjoy it. They live on the dark side of human nature.”

 



KEEPING IT “SEUSS”: THE FILM’S LOOK

Determined to stay true to the vision and magic of Dr. Seuss’ environments and
characters while translating his pen and ink style into a fully dimensional world, Jimmy
Hayward and Steve Martino visited the Geisel Library at the University of California San
Diego, which houses all of his original work. Searching for clues to Seussian design, the
filmmakers studied the author’s original art and read every manuscript, even his
handwritten notes and annotations. Says Steve Martino: “I was particularly taken by
some sculptures Seuss had done, which provided direction on how he would have
translated his ideas and world into three dimensions. We found some subtle references to
color, shape and texture that would incorporate into the film.

“Looking at the body of Dr. Seuss’ work for inspiration, we began to get into a
zone of Seussian exaggeration,” Martino continues. “It became infectious, and we began

 



to dial into Seuss’ visual vocabulary. We would digitally brush the hair of a Who, for
example, and ask, how can we do that Seuss-style? Being in his world stimulated our
imaginations.”

From the Seuss works he and Hayward painstakingly studied at the archives,
Martino created a style guide that provided a foundation from which the filmmakers
created a fully dimensional, textured and realistically lit world. “We could take a camera
through the 3-D world we were building and explore it in great depth,” notes Martino.

Seuss enjoyed surprising people with little details and off-kilter designs. The key
to success in translating his work to the world of computer animation was making these
details and designs fun and relatable. The filmmakers called their approach “Seussian
logic” – a process that ensured every crazy gizmo and contraption was entertainingly
correct.

 



Who-ville, an entire city resting on a speck that has landed on a clover, resembles
in some ways our world’s day-to-day existence: people go to school, they work and they
shop. But a job in Who-ville might entail as Hayward points out, “laying on a couch all
day eating bon-bons.”

Modes of transportation in Who-ville mix fun with relatability. The city’s multilayered
streets are lined with sock-mobiles, roller-bladers on stilts, and unicyclists, to
name only a few of the unusual ways the Whos get around. “If there’s a way to get
someplace, we wanted to make it the most interesting and fun way to go,” says Martino.
The aforementioned sock-mobile – a car that has four legs and walks…with socks – was
a favorite of the filmmakers. It’s the perfect vehicle for a hospital zone or a library, or
any area where silence was golden. Another favorite was the bed-mobile. “It would save
a lot of steps in the morning,” says Hayward. “You could read a book on your way to
work, or catch up on some sleep.”

If a sock-mobile or bed-mobile sound too conventional for you, then you might
want to try Jo-Jo’s giant sling-shot device, which he uses to access an old observatory
that figures prominently in the story. First, Jo-Jo sits down on a unicycle connected to
the contraption, then he pedals back the unicycle, looking like he’s about to launch
himself into a wall, grabs and pulls back on a lever, firing himself straight up in the air, to
a hanging stairway.

 



What about recreation, like a game of tennis? Here, too, imagination and fun rule
the day. “Dr. Seuss never took a straight line from point A to point B, so we reasoned that
the Whos wouldn’t play on a ‘normal’ tennis court,” says Hayward. “We thought, Why
not elevate half the court in one spot, and have these crazy stairwells running between the
two court-halves?”

Gravity isn’t much of an issue in Who-ville, where narrow staircases with no
railings spiral up into the sky, and where Whos routinely walk around on the sides of
giant buildings. “There’s no reason to get hurt in Who-ville,” Hayward points out.
“Getting hurt is no fun.”

Even when Hayward, Martino and their teams came up with original designs, they
wanted audiences to feel like they were experiencing something from a Seussian world
“We worked to find an authenticity that fit into people’s memories of Seuss’ book,”
explains Martino. Seuss’ Whos, for example, were bug-like with round heads. To make
the characters more expressive, the filmmakers re-imagined the characters, giving them
more facial mobility and brow movement.

The filmmakers built upon the minimalist Nool conceived by Seuss, who in his
book, says art director Thomas Cardone, “left huge white spaces for text and some
artwork. So we really didn’t start with a Seuss jungle because he didn’t create one.”
The movie’s Nool is like no jungle we’ve seen before, rich with enormous swirling
fronds, billowing blue bushes and towering palm trees topped with hair-like tufts.

But even here, Seuss was an important inspiration. “We needed to create that
white space, so to speak,” explains Steve Martino. “We began by using Seuss’ unusual
jungle color palette – reds, blues and other odd colors, and fur plants” – a far cry from the
lush, green you’d expect in a jungle. “Every leaf in Nool has a kind of Seuss flare, such
as asymmetrical curves, and little patterns in the veining.” Adds Cardone: “When you
look at a Seuss tree, it will always be heavier on one side, and look different from all
angles.”





FUR IS THE NEW BLACK:
DRESSING AND GROOMING THE CHARACTERS


In Who-ville, fur is more than a fine coat of hair covering the skin – it’s a fashion
statement. All the clothing in the tiny town is made of fur. The underlying geometry of a
Who is what the Blue Sky fur team called a “peanut” – a naked Who under a suit, jacket,
shirt, or dress of fur. The result is a very stylized fur look.

The fur-as-fashion notion comes straight from Dr. Seuss. “He had great
renderings of fur in his books,” says Hayward, who points to a personal favorite dating
back to the director’s childhood: “I remembered this one drawing in the book [Horton
Hears a Who!] where there’s a Who wearing a fur shirt. I became obsessed with that
character, maybe because my name is Hayward and the guy’s shirt has an ‘H’ on it,” he
adds, with a laugh.

“The Whos go to the barber and get themselves trimmed a new suit,” Martino
explains. And what’s new in the Who-ville fashion scene? “Neck tufts are very big,” he
adds. “You’ll see lots of high turtlenecks and big collars.”

Everything from haute couture to functional garb is the product of a Who-ville
barber – and Blue Sky Studios’ innovative fur and grooming teams. The fur and other
unique visuals are a product of Blue Sky’s proprietary technology, the cornerstone of
which is its ray tracing renderer, CGI Studio. The renderer, the fastest and most
advanced of its type, allowed the filmmakers to manipulate the fur and environments, as
if they were working with real lights on a real set, working with materials that behaved
the way they do in the “real” world. It renders surfaces as if you could touch them.

The renderer made possible the film’s huge crowd and mob scenes, featuring
thousand of furry characters. But it was much more than fur and fashion for the film’s
innovative R&D team, which also created a field of one-half-billion clovers for a pivotal
scene. Vlad, after snatching the clover, on which rests the speck/Who-ville, out of
Horton’s trunk, drops the precious flower into a field of about five hundred million – one-
half-billion—clovers stretching as far as the eye can see. One by one, Horton examines
the clovers, carving his way through the immense field. It’s the ultimate “needle-in-ahaystack”
scenario.

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It’s a key moment in Seuss’ book, and a seminal one for Jimmy Hayward. “I
thought it was incredible when Horton [in the book] ran up and screams, ‘NO!!!’, as the
speck/clover floated down in the sea of clovers,” he relates. Hayward, like millions of
other readers, couldn’t wait to turn the page and discover what came next – a memory he
kept in mind as the scene was put together. As Horton realizes what’s happened, “we
swing the camera all the way around him to reveal the massive clover field, from left to
right, just like you’re turning a page,” Hayward explains. “It seemed like the right way to
reveal this image.”

The Blue Sky R&D team also built into the renderer a proprietary algorithm that
allowed the filmmakers to depict the wind blowing across the top of the clover field, just
as wind would ripple across a Kansas wheat field. (Martino, a Midwesterner, has a
particular fondness for this effect.)

The “hero” clover – the one housing Who-ville – was made up of a million hairs.
For the clover field scene, the clovers closest to the camera had the full hair count or
close to it; the “extra” or “supporting” closers averaged 50,000 hairs.

SQUASH AND STRETCH…CAUSE AND EFFECT:
HORTON CROSSES A BRIDGE – AS THE MAYOR VISITS THE DENTIST


Endeavoring to fully capture the wondrous and wildly imaginative worlds of Dr.
Seuss, the filmmakers push the animation and rigging beyond the traditional boundaries
of animation physics and character performance and believability.

They employ “squash-and-stretch” techniques to push Horton and the Mayor to
extreme looks and movements. In traditional 2-D animation, squash-and-stretch gives
characters elasticity and movement. But Hayward, Martino and the Blue Sky artists,
animators and technicians take the technique to a new level.

Perhaps no scene better demonstrates the effectiveness of their squash-and-stretch
techniques than when Horton – clover in tow – attempts to cross a long, rickety bamboo
bridge overhanging on a deep gorge. At the same time, the Mayor is visiting the dentist,
who is about to use a giant hypodermic needle on the Mayor. Hayward and Martino
intercut the two hyper-precarious situations, creating an intricately constructed scene of

12



cause-and-effect. Every Horton action (or stumble) has an equal (or equally crazy)
reaction on the Mayor.

In the sequence, the filmmakers employ squash-and-stretch to inflate Horton’s
trunk – the ten-thousand-pound elephant (and eternal optimist), thinking air to be
“lighter” than anything, believes he can float across the bridge like a dirigible. Needless
to say, Horton’s expectations aren’t quite fulfilled. As Horton, inflated trunk and all,
continues to stumble, leaving broken pieces of the bridge behind every step, the dentist’s
hypodermic ends up in the Mayor’s arm instead of his mouth. The filmmakers again
seize the opportunity to push the animation, stretching the mayor’s injected arm 30-feetlong.
As the Mayor flees the office, his newly-elongated and flaccid limb accidentally
smacks a few people across the face.

Hayward credits Jim Carrey with coming up with the idea for the situation: “Jim
asked, ‘If an elephant was carrying your world around on a speck, where would be the
worst place for the Mayor to be?’” remembers Hayward. “After suggesting something to
do with power tools, Jim asked, ‘What if the Mayor was at the dentist – who’s wielding a
hypodermic?’”

The animators also used squash-and-stretch for a “smear” effect, where, for
example, a character’s legs move so quickly, they begin to smear – and look like they’re
doubling or tripling in number.

“THE ELEPHANT IS LISTENING”:
SOUND AND MUSIC COME TOGETHER IN DR. SEUSS’ HORTON HEARS A
WHO!


With the word “Hears” figuring so prominently in the title and storyline, it will
come as no surprise that sound design and score were two of the film’s most critical
elements. “The film’s central conceit is that the two main characters never meet – they
can only hear one another,” Hayward elaborates. “Each has to believe what they’re
hearing. And if that’s not the basis for a wonderful sound design, I don’t know what is.”

The film’s intricate and at times majestic marriage of sound design and music
stems from the talents of two-time Oscar® winning sound designer Randy Thom (“The
Incredibles,” “The Right Stuff”), who has also worked on films ranging from “Raiders of

13



the Lost Ark” to “Ratatouille”; and composer John Powell, whose credits include
“Shrek,” “Happy Feet,” “Ice Age: The Meltdown” – and the three “Bourne” films.

Thom and Powell began collaborating unusually early in the process. “John and I
brainstormed with the directors over a year before the movie’s release,” says Thom. “We
all understand the film was going to be a real playground for sound. It’s a rare treat to
share sounds with a composer, and we worked to integrate the two areas as much as
possible.”

Thom endeavored to open the audiences’ ears to different perceptions of sounds –
suspending disbelief that a microscopic man and a five-ton elephant could actually hear
one another. The first contact between Horton and the Mayor involves complex sound
transitions: As the speck flies through the air, we see the adrift Whos yelling (or, more
accurately, “yelping”) for help. The filmmakers cut back and forth between the pointsof-
view of Horton – whose over-sized ears pick up the “microscopic” sounds of tiny
voices coming from the speck – and of the airborne Who-ville, where we hear the Whos
full-bodied cries of surprise.

Looking to make contact with whoever is behind the tiny sounds, Horton bellows,
“HELLO!” to the speck. We follow the sound wave as it travels down to the speck like a
spaceship flying towards Earth. It hits the clover, passes through a blanket of clouds, and
then disappears into a giant funnel, traveling through a maze of ducts – until it emerges
from a drainpipe outside the Mayor’s office.

As the voice makes its journey through the atmosphere, Thom modulates it in
various ways, such as altering its pitch and creating what he calls a “warbling sound” –
all to complement the sound-wave visual. For its journey down the drainpipe, Thom adds
a bunch of “clinks” and “clanks” and other metal-stretching sounds that accompany the
continuing “Hello” sound.

It’s a fun moment for the audience – and an astounding one for Horton. “We’re in
the middle of some kind of amazing cosmic convergence!” Horton exclaims to the
Mayor. “Two vastly different worlds miraculously crossing paths! Mine colossal, and
yours miniscule, yet somehow we’ve managed to make contact!”

Sound takes center stage for the film’s epic climax, in which every Who comes
together, using whatever they can to make noise to make themselves heard – and save

14



themselves from certain doom. In unison, they shout, “WE ARE HERE! WE ARE
HERE!” Help comes from an unexpected source: the Mayor’s son Jo-Jo, who contributes
his Symphoniphone – a wondrous musical instrument he’s rigged from non-musical
objects – to the multi-layered, city-wide symphony.

As the filmmakers put these finishing touches on the film, Audrey Geisel, wife of
the late creator of these magical worlds, pondered what her husband would think of
Horton Hears a Who! becoming a major CG animated motion picture. “He would
probably be saying,” she shares, “that ‘Horton was so large and had such a big heart, the
movie had to happen this way.’”

ABOUT THE CAST

JIM CARREY (Horton) recently wrapped the comedy “Yes Man,” directed by
Peyton Reed. In the film, based on a memoir by British author Danny Wallace, Carrey
stars as a man who decides to change his life by saying yes to absolutely everything that
comes his way. Carrey will follow “Yes Man” with “A Christmas Carol,” an adaptation
of the Charles Dickens tale that Robert Zemeckis wrote and will direct for Walt Disney
Pictures. In the film Carrey will play Ebenezer Scrooge and the three ghosts that haunt
him. Zemeckis will shoot the film using "performance capture/Disney digital 3-D"
animation.

Carrey will then begin work on the Paramount Pictures’ feature “Ripley’s Believe
it or Not!” for director Tim Burton. The film reunites Carrey with writer Steve Oedekerk
(“Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls”). The film is scheduled for a 2009 release. Carrey
has also signed on to star in “I Love You Phillip Morris,” a dark comedy that was written
and will mark the directing debut of Glenn Ficarra and John Requa, the writing team
behind "Bad Santa." Based on a book by Houston Chronicle crime reporter Steve
McVicker, the fact-based film casts Carrey as Steven Russell, a married father whose
exploits land him in the Texas criminal justice system. In prison he falls in love with his
cellmate, who eventually is set free, leading Russell to escape from Texas prisons four
times.

Last year, Carrey starred in the thriller “The Number 23,” for director Joel
Schumacher. In 2005 Carrey starred opposite Tea Leoni in the highly successful comedy

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“Fun with Dick and Jane.” The film was directed by Dean Parisot (“Galaxy Quest”) and
produced by Brian Grazer. In 2004 he starred in the Paramount Pictures’ film “Lemony
Snicket’s a Series of Unfortunate Events,” based on the children’s book series by Daniel
Handler, as well as the critically acclaimed Focus Features’ drama “Eternal Sunshine of
the Spotless Mind.”

In 2003, he starred in the hugely successful Universal Pictures’ comedy “Bruce
Almighty.” The film, which has made over $470 million dollars worldwide, was one of
the highest grossing films of the year. “Bruce Almighty” also reunited Carrey with
director Tom Shadyac (“Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” & “Liar, Liar”) and writer Steve
Oedekerk (“Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls”).

In 2001, Carrey starred in the Castle Rock feature “The Majestic,” directed by
Frank Darabont and in 2000, he had the distinction of appearing in the year’s highest
grossing film; the Universal Pictures’ release “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” He was
nominated for a Golden Globe in the category of “Best Actor in a Motion Picture -
Musical or Comedy” for his portrayal of the Grinch, as well as a People’s Choice Award
in the category of “Favorite Motion Picture Star in a Comedy.”

In the summer of 2000, Carrey reunited with directors Peter and Bobby Farrelly
for the 20th Century Fox comedy “Me, Myself and Irene,” for which he received an MTV
Movie Award™ nomination in the category of “Best Comedic Performance” for his
portrayal of a split personality in the film. He also won the Golden Globe in 2000 for
“Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy” for his portrayal of Andy
Kaufman in the 1999 film “Man on the Moon.” He had won a Golden Globe Award the
previous year for “Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama for his role in the critically
acclaimed film “The Truman Show.” The 1999 Golden Globe win marked Carrey’s first
award for a dramatic role. He also received a Golden Globe nomination in 1997 for
“Best Actor in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy” for “Liar, Liar,” the same category
in which he was nominated in 1995 for “The Mask.” In 2000, he was named “Male Star
of the Year” at ShoWest.

Born January 17, 1962 in Newmarket, Ontario, Jim Carrey knew by age three that
show business was in his blood. At age 15, Carrey took off for Toronto to perform at
Yuk Yuks, the famous comedy club. Following the performance, Carrey’s career took

16



off and for the next few years he worked in comedy clubs all over Canada. In 1981, at
age 19, he packed his belongings and moved to Los Angeles. Carrey immediately
became a regular at Mitzi Shore’s Comedy Store, attracting the attention of comedy
legend Rodney Dangerfield. Dangerfield was so impressed with the young comic that
they began touring together. It was then that things began to happen for Jim Carrey.

1982 proved to be a magical year for Carrey when MTM cast him as the star of
their NBC series “Duck Factory.” Although the series only lasted 13 weeks, Carrey’s
work left a lasting impression in Hollywood. The next year he landed the lead role in the
feature film “Once Bitten,” starring Lauren Hutton. He followed that film with roles in
Francis Ford Coppola’s “Peggy Sue Got Married,” and the Geena Davis comedy “Earth
Girls Are Easy.” In 1988, Carrey made a brief, but memorable, appearance as “Johnny
Squares,” the self-destructive rock star in the Clint Eastwood film “The Dead Pool.”

In 1990, Carrey joined the cast of Fox Television’s ensemble comedy hit “In
Living Color.” In November of the following year, his first Showtime Special, entitled
“Jim Carrey’s Unnatural Act,” premiered to rave reviews. He followed the special’s
success with a starring role as an alcoholic trying to cope with life in Fox’s Emmy®
nominated movie of the week “Doing Time on Maple Drive.”

In 1994, after several successful seasons on “In Living Color,” Carrey once again
branched out into feature films by accepting the lead role in the Warner Bros. comedy
“Ace Ventura: Pet Detective.” Carrey’s no-holds-barred portrayal of “Ace Ventura”
made him an instant sensation and made the film a hit. Carrey followed that success in
the summer of 1994 by starring in the title role of the action-fantasy “The Mask,” based
on the best -selling Dark Horse comic book series of the same name. “The Mask” went
on to gross in excess of $100 million domestically, winning spectacular reviews for
Carrey. That same year he starred opposite Jeff Daniels in the Farrelly brothers’ film
“Dumb and Dumber.” Carrey starred as the “Riddler/ Edward Nygma” in the 1995
blockbuster sequel “Batman Forever.” The following year he went on to star in “Ace
Ventura: When Nature Calls,” continuing the misadventures of the world’s favorite pet
detective, and then starred in Columbia Pictures’ “The Cable Guy.” Universal Pictures
hit “Liar, Liar,” which opened to record breaking numbers in 1997 earning over $100
million in ticket grosses. His triumphant triple play earned him the honor of

17



“NATO/ShoWest Comedy Star of the Year.”

STEVE CARELL (Mayor) has emerged as one of the most sought-after comedic
actors in Hollywood. First gaining recognition for his contributions as a correspondent
on Comedy Central’s Emmy Award-winning “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” Carell
has successfully segued into primetime television and above-the-title status in the film
world with equal aplomb.

Carell opened his first lead feature, “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” which he co-wrote
with director Judd Apatow, at #1, a spot it remained in for two straight weekends. The
surprise hit of 2005 went on to gross more than $175 million worldwide and opened at
the top position in box office in 12 countries. The film generated over $100 million in
DVD sales in North America alone. It was honored with an AFI Award (named one of
10 Most Outstanding Motion Pictures of the Year) and took home Best Comedy Movie at
the 11th annual Critics’ Choice Awards. The film also earned Carell and Apatow
nominations for Best Original Screenplay by the Writers Guild Association.

Carell stars in the American adaptation of the acclaimed British television series
“The Office.” In its fourth season, the show continues to flourish in the ratings. In 2006
and 2007 Carell earned a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a
Television Series -- Musical or Comedy for his portrayal of Michael Scott, the pompous
and deluded boss of a Pennsylvania paper company.

In 2006, as part of an ensemble, Carell starred in “Little Miss Sunshine,” which
earned an Academy Award® nomination for Best Picture and won the SAG Award™ for
Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. The comedy also starred Greg
Kinnear and Toni Collette. Previous film credits for the actor include “Anchorman: The
Legend of Ron Burgundy,” “Bruce Almighty” and “Bewitched.”

Last year, Carell starred opposite Juliette Binoche in the romantic comedy “Dan
in Real Life,” and in the comedy “Evan Almighty.” Upcoming is the much-anticipated
action-comedy “Get Smart,” opposite Anne Hathaway.

Born in Massachusetts, Carell now resides in Los Angeles with his wife, actress
Nancy Walls (“Saturday Night Live”), whom he met while at the Second City Theater

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Group in Chicago, where both were members. He is the proud father of a daughter and a
son.

CAROL BURNETT (Kangaroo), a six-time Emmy Award winner, has
demonstrated such versatility since ending the eleven year run of the "Carol Burnett
Show" that she is as widely recognized for her dramatic abilities as she is for her comedic
and musical talents. Americans fondly consider Carol Burnett a true living legend in
entertainment, having bestowed more People's Choice Awards upon her than any other
woman in the award show's history. In 2003 she was a recipient of the Kennedy Center
Honors and in 2005 received The Presidential Medal of Freedom. Some of her other
notable awards include five Golden Globes, the Peabody Award for "Friendly Fire," and
the Ace Award for "Between Friends" with Elizabeth Taylor. She has enjoyed the kind of
career that most performers are only able to dream of, moving easily from the stage to
television, from feature films to films for television, and from variety specials to music
and comedy specials.

In her 2005 version of “Once Upon A Mattress” for ABC TV, she played Queen
Aggravain, and Tracey Ullman co-starred as Princess Winnifred, the role Carol made
famous during its smash Broadway run. She also starred as Winnifred in two previous
television productions of the musical.

The CBS Special “The Carol Burnett Show: Let’s Bump Up The Lights,” was
broadcast in May of 2004, and reunited Carol with Tim Conway, Harvey Korman, Vicki
Lawrence and Lyle Waggoner. The show featured the spontaneous and hilarious
moments that were seen at the beginning of every “The Carol Burnett Show” – where
Carol and the gang answered questions from the studio audience. Carol's previous
special, "The Carol Burnett Show: Show Stoppers" with Harvey, Vicki and Tim attracted
nearly 30 million viewers. It was the fourth most watched program of 2001 and was
nominated for three Emmy's including "Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special."

In April 2002 "Hollywood Arms," directed by Harold Prince, had its world
premiere at Chicago's Goodman Theatre. The idea for the play was conceived by Carol's
daughter, Carrie Hamilton, who had died of cancer in January of that year. Carrie and
Carol co-wrote the script based on Carol's 1986 best-selling memoir One More Time. The

19



production went on to make its Broadway debut at The Cort Theater on October 31,
2002. To perpetuate Carrie’s love of the performing arts, Carol has created The Carrie
Hamilton Foundation which is currently supporting the fundraising efforts to establish
The Carrie Hamilton Theater at The Pasadena Playhouse complex. The Carrie Hamilton
Theater will support the works of young playwrights, directors and actors as well as
embody an outreach program for at-risk children to expose them to the world of theater
and the value of their own creative powers.

Carol last appeared on Broadway in 1999 in the Stephen Sondheim musical
review “Putting It Together;” the production was first mounted in 1998, to great critical
and commercial success, at Los Angeles’ Mark Taper Forum. Her Broadway appearance,
prior to "Putting It Together” was in 1995 with Philip Bosco in the Ken Ludwig farce
"Moon Over Buffalo." Best Actor In A Play Tony Award nominations were bestowed on
both Carol and Philip for their performances in the hit show.

In 1996 Carol began her much acclaimed appearances as Jamie Buchman’s
(Helen Hunt) mother on NBC’s “Mad About You,” for which she won a Best Supporting
Actress Emmy. The episodes, which were among the series highest rated, continued into
the 1997 season. 1994 was a busy year for Carol. She produced two specials for CBS,
“Men, Movies & Carol," which spoofed the cinema and guest starred Tony Bennett, Scott
Bakula, Michael Jeter and Barry Bostwick; and "Carol Burnett: The Special Years,"
featuring the most memorable moments from nine of her specials. "Seasons of the
Heart," a dramatic telefilm on NBC, in which she co-starred with George Segal and
Malcolm McDowell, also aired that year.

Carol spent most of her childhood in a less-than-glamorous section of Hollywood
and attended UCLA before heading to New York. It was a rough beginning as jobs were
tough until Carol staged her own musical revue, featuring her out-of-work roommates
from a theatrical boarding house performing material by unemployed writers and
composers. Soon offers for summer stock and 13 weeks' work on Paul Winchell's Kiddie
TV show followed. Shortly thereafter, while performing at The Blue Angel in New
York, she was spotted by talent bookers from both "The Jack Paar Show" and "The Ed
Sullivan Show." Television audiences of both shows were doubled over with laughter at
Carol's now-legendary rendition of "I Made a Fool of Myself Over John Foster Dulles."

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After guest spots on Garry Moore's morning TV show of the time, Carol went on
to make an appearance on the evening telecast of "The Garry Moore Show." During the
first year of "The Garry Moore Show," she simultaneously performed the lead role in the
off-Broadway musical, "Once Upon a Mattress." The show was an instant hit and later
moved on to Broadway.

The first of her several specials with Julie Andrews followed, "Julie and Carol at
Carnegie Hall," an hour musical show on CBS. Juggling both Broadway and television,
Carol starred on the stage in "Fade Out, Fade In," and in a number of televised specials,
including "Carol & Company," with Robert Preston; a 90-minute version of "Once Upon
a Mattress"; an original musical, "Calamity Jane"; "Carol + 2" with Lucille Ball and Zero
Mostel, and "Carol & Company" with Rock Hudson. In 1967, Carol returned to Los
Angeles to begin what would become the longest-running musical comedy variety show
in television history: the Emmy winning "The Carol Burnett Show."

Although the 11-year run of "The Carol Burnett Show" kept her extremely busy,
she managed to find time to headline in Las Vegas with friend Jim Nabors as well as
make her stage debut in a non-musical, "Plaza Suite," at the Huntington Hartford Theater
in Los Angeles. She starred in another legit outing, "Same Time, Next Year" with Dick
Van Dyke and then the Gower Champion-directed production of "I Do, I Do!" with Rock
Hudson. Her second Julie Andrews special followed, "Julie and Carol at Lincoln
Center," along with starring roles in the feature films "Pete 'N Tillie" with Walter
Matthau and "The Front Page" again with Matthau and Jack Lemmon. During the 197374
season, while still doing "The Carol Burnett Show," she co-starred with Alan Alda in
"6 Rms Riv Vu" on CBS and the following year portrayed four characters in a 90-minute
special television presentation of George Furth's comedy/drama, "Twigs." Teaming with
opera star Beverly Sills in "Sills & Burnett at the Met," which aired during the 1976-77
season, Carol won a Christopher Award.

Carol has also starred in a variety of film and television projects since she made
the conscious decision to bring "The Carol Burnett Show" to an end in 1978, after the
series won a total of 25 Emmy Awards and while it was still enormously popular. Other
productions include the critically acclaimed and highly rated musical special "Julie and
Carol: Together Again" and in 1998 the telefilm “The Marriage Fool” in which she again

21



co-starred with Walter Matthau. In recognition of this vast body of television
accomplishments, The National Association of Broadcasters inducted her into their
prestigious Hall of Fame.

Additional feature films include "The Four Seasons," "Chu Chu and the Philly
Flash," "Annie," and two films directed by Robert Altman, "Health" and "A Wedding,"
for which she won the San Sebastian Film Award as Best Actress. Her most recent film
credit is the starring role, opposite Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve, in the
adaptation of the hilarious British stage farce, "Noises Off," directed by Peter
Bogdanovich.

Home audiences saw her in such television movies as "The Grass Is Always
Greener Over the Septic Tank," "Friendly Fire," for which she received an Emmy
nomination, "The Tenth Month," as well as the HBO films "Between Friends" with
Elizabeth Taylor and "The Laundromat," directed by Robert Altman. Other television
specials include "Dolly and Carol In Nashville" with Dolly Parton, "Burnett /Discovers/
Domingo" with Placido Domingo and a two-hour ABC presentation of Neil Simon's play
"Plaza Suite," which she had performed on stage in Los Angeles. In 1991 she hosted two
highly acclaimed CBS specials, "The Very Best of the Ed Sullivan Show," and her own
"The Carol Burnett Show: A Reunion," two of the network's highest rated shows during
the season. Carol never lost her love of performing before a live audience and since 1990,
she has appeared in numerous productions of "Love Letters," starring opposite such
leading men as Leslie Nielsen, Tony Roberts, Charlton Heston, Tom Selleck, Brian
Dennehy and Cliff Robertson. She returned to musical comedy in the 1993 Long Beach
Civic Light Opera productions of "From The Top!," (an original musical written
especially for Carol by long-time collaborators and friends Ken and Mitzie Welch) and
Stephen Sondheim's "Company."

What started as a letter to her daughters as a record of Carol's life and their family
history turned into One More Time, a critically acclaimed memoir published by Random
House which reached the non-fiction best sellers lists in 1986.

Carol's social and charitable endeavors are legion. She has donated scholarships
to her alma mater, UCLA, on whose board of trustees she serves and where she has
established "The Carol Burnett Musical Theater Competition."

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In addition to UCLA, Carol has also contributed to scholarship funds at the
University of Hawaii for ethics in journalism, and created scholarship funds for
performers at Boston's Emerson College and The College of Santa Fe. Carol continues to
give without hesitation to numerous charities, always remembering that she has been
generously given to as well.

WILL ARNETT (Vlad) recently starred in the basketball-themed comedy “Semi
Pro” with Will Ferrell and Woody Harrelson. Last year, Arnett was seen opposite Will
Ferrell, Jon Heder and his wife Amy Poehler in the figure skating comedy “Blades of
Glory.” He also recently starred in “Brothers Solomon” opposite Will Forte. In addition,
Arnett lent his voice to blockbuster animated feature “Ice Age 2: The Meltdown” and costarred
opposite Robin Williams in “R.V.,” directed by Barry Sonnenfeld.

Arnett is currently attached to star in "Most Likely to Succeed" for Universal,
"Dad Can't Lose" and "Get 'Em Wet" for Paramount, as well as “The Ambassador” for
Dreamworks and Paramount, which he will also executive produce.

Arnett earned his first Emmy nomination for his work on the critically acclaimed
Fox sitcom “Arrested Development,” where he portrayed Gob Bluth. The show was
nominated for two Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series, winning one for its first
season. It also nabbed a Golden Globe nomination – and a cult following of loyal fans.

Before “Arrested Development,” Arnett was a regular on the NBC comedy series
“The Mike O’Malley Show.” His additional television credits include guest-starring
roles on “Sex and the City,” “The Sopranos,” “Boston Public,” “Third Watch” and “Law
& Order: Special Victims Unit.” Arnett also appeared on NBC’s “Will & Grace” playing
Jack’s dance nemesis while auditioning to become a backup dancer for Janet Jackson.
Most recently Arnett was seen twice on NBC’s “30 Rock” playing Devon Banks in a
very memorable guest-starring role.

Arnett’s feature credits include roles in “Monster-In-Law,” “The Waiting Game,”
“The Broken Giant,” “Southie” and “Ed’s Next Move.” Additionally, he served as the
narrator for the film “Series 7: The Contenders” and can be heard in a variety of
commercials most notably as the voice of GMC Trucks.

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Arnett currently splits his residency between Los Angeles and New York where
he lives with his wife, actress and “Saturday Night Live” star Amy Poehler.

ISLA FISHER (Dr. Mary Lou LaRue) stars with Ryan Reynolds and Abigail
Breslin in the comedy “Definitely, Maybe,” written and directed by Adam Brooks.
Before that she starred in the critically acclaimed film “The Lookout,” written and
directed by Scott Frank, and also starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Jeff Daniels; and in
the comedy “Hot Rod” with Andy Samberg of “Saturday Night Live.” She also starred in
“Wedding Daze” with Jason Biggs, written and directed by Michael Ian Black.

Fisher is most widely recognized for her critically acclaimed performance as
Vince Vaughn’s off-kilter love interest in the blockbuster comedy “Wedding Crashers.”
She first appeared stateside in the live-action feature “Scooby-Doo,” in 2002. Since then,
she appeared in “I Heart Huckabees” for director David O. Russell, and the
scripted/improvisation television series “Pilot Season,” with David Cross, Andy Dick and
Sarah Silverman.

Born in the Middle-Eastern country of Oman, Fisher’s family moved to the small
city of Perth in Western Australia when she was a young girl. At the age of nine, Fisher
was already appearing in commercials broadcast on Australian television. She then
portrayed Shannon Reed in the popular soap “Home and Away,” which also helped
launch the careers of Guy Pearce, Naomi Watts and Heath Ledger. While working on the
set of “Home and Away,” she found time to write and release two best-selling teenthemed
novels.

AMY POEHLER (Sally O’Malley) is in her seventh season as a cast member of
“Saturday Night Live” (and her fourth as the co-anchor of “Weekend Update,”). Poehler
stars in the Warner Bros. comedy “Spring Breakdown” opposite Parker Posey, and the
Universal Pictures comedy “Baby Mama” opposite Tina Fey. Poehler is producing,
writing and providing the voice in the new Nickelodeon animated television series
“Mighty B” about the exploits of a ten-year-old Honeybee scout.

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Last year, Poehler had a starring role in the ice-skating comedy “Blades of
Glory,” alongside Will Ferrell, Will Arnett, and Jon Heder. She also lent her voice to the
box office smash hit “Shrek the Third” as Snow White.

Poehler boasts an impressive arsenal of outrageous characters, from the
hyperactive Caitlin and one-legged reality show contestant Amber to a manic host of
“Good Morning Meth.” Poehler has also contributed memorable impressions of Kelly
Ripa, Avril Lavigne, Sharon Osbourne, Paula Abdul, Senator Hillary Clinton, Sharon
Stone and Michael Jackson.

Poehler joined the SNL cast from the Upright Citizens Brigade, a sketch/improv
troupe originally formed in Chicago. Poehler and the U.C.B. relocated to New York,
where they had a sketch show on Comedy Central for three seasons, on which she was
both a writer and performer. In addition, they opened a theater currently regarded as the
premiere sketch/improv comedy venue in New York City. Poehler and the U.C.B. was
featured in “A.S.S.S.S.C.A.T.: Improv,” an improvised comedy special on Bravo.

Other feature credits include “Mean Girls,” “Mr. Woodcock,” “Southland Tales,”
“Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny,” “The Ex,” “Wet Hot American Summer” and
“Envy.”

Poehler has made memorable appearances on “Late Night with Conan O'Brien,”
“Arrested Development,” “Wonder Showzen” and “Undeclared.” She also was a voice
on “O’Grady” and “The Simpsons.”

Poehler is married to actor Will Arnett and lives in New York City

SETH ROGEN (Morton), an actor, writer and producer, had a starring role
opposite Katherine Heigl in “Knocked Up,” which grossed nearly $150 million at the
domestic box office. He co-wrote, executive produced and appeared in the critically
acclaimed teen hit “Superbad,” a semi-autobiographical comedy that earned close to $120
million.

Earlier this year, Rogen was the Narrator in the fantasy-adventure “The
Spiderwick Chronicles.” Rogen also co-wrote the screenplay for another Apatowproduced
comedy, “Drillbit Taylor,” starring Owen Wilson.

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Rogen began his career at the tender age of thirteen, performing standup comedy
in Vancouver. After moving to Los Angeles, he landed supporting roles in Judd
Apatow’s critically acclaimed network television comedies, “Freaks and Geeks” and
“Undeclared,” launching Rogen’s reputation for portraying losers, slackers and otherwise
average Joes. At eighteen, proving his chops behind the camera, Rogen was hired as a
staff writer on “Undeclared.”

In 2005, Apatow cast Rogen in the hit feature comedy “The 40 Year Old Virgin,”
which opened theatrically at #1 and went on to gross $165 million worldwide. Coproduced
by Rogen, the film was named one of Ten Most Outstanding Motion Pictures of
the Year by AFI and won Best Comedy Movie at the Critics’ Choice Awards. The same
year he was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music
or Comedy on HBO’s “Da Ali G Show.”

The 26-year-old Canadian continues to verify his place among a new generation
of triple-threat comedic writer/producer/actors. His upcoming films include the action
comedy “Pineapple Express” and the animated “Kung Fu Panda.” Rogen and writing
partner Evan Goldberg are penning “The Green Hornet,” a project he’s slated to star in
and executive produce.

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

JIMMY HAYWARD’s (Director) background in animation is as deep and varied
as the projects he’s been a part of. His feature film directorial debut, a CG adaptation of
Dr. Seuss’ beloved Horton Hears a Who! is the second Blue Sky Studios picture of which
he’s been a part. Hayward joined Blue Sky’s “Robots” as a writer and story consultant,
also providing additional direction.

Hayward landed his first job on the small screen, serving as a senior animator on
ABC’s “Reboot,” the first-ever CG television show.

Before joining Blue Sky Studios, Hayward was a member of the team at Pixar
Animation Studios. Hayward’s work with the company began with its debut feature,
“Toy Story,” on which he was an animator. He continued with Pixar through “Toy Story
2,” working with director Ash Brannon on story development. As the picture neared
production, Hayward pieced together and subsequently supervised the animation team,

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through the film’s initial stages. He remained on “Toy Story 2” as an animator, also
serving in that capacity on Pixar’s “A Bug’s Life,” “Monsters Inc.” and “Finding Nemo.”

While honing his own ability at Pixar, Hayward found he had a talent for
teaching. He channeled this skill into Pixar University, where he put together and taught
a program meant to shape traditional and stop motion artists into Pixar animators.
Hayward also taught animation at the San Francisco Academy of Art’s Pixar Program.
There, he designed and taught a Pixar-sponsored degree in animation and story for seven
years.

In addition to his studio-based success, Hayward has found a market for his
personal projects as well. “Chumps,” a show he co-created, was sold into development at
MTV Networks, where he wrote the first season and directed pilot tests. At MTV,
Hayward continued to work as a scribe, rewriting pilots and aiding in development on
“Mulletheads” and “The Ready, Set Go! Kids.”

STEVE MARTINO (Director) is a pioneer in the field of computer animation.
He has been working in this arena since 1981 as both a designer and director of
animation. After receiving his undergraduate degree in graphic design, Martino
commenced his graduate work in computer animation at The Ohio State University’s
Computer Graphics Research Group. This was the first program of its kind to place artists
with computer scientists in a collaborative environment to develop new methods for
creating animation. Martino received his Masters degree from this program, where he
completed his thesis work on designing and storyboarding for computer animation.

Martino was on the frontier of the blossoming CGI industry when he joined
Cranston/Csuri Productions in 1983, where he designed, animated and produced
computer animation solutions for such clients as ABC, CBS, NBC, HBO, and ESPN.
Martino’s design and animation work led to his personal recognition and the studios
garnering of awards from the Broadcast Designers Association, The International
Monitor Awards, and numerous film festivals.

In 1987 the computer animation industry exploded with major advancements in
technology and rapid growth in production. Martino took this opportunity to move to Los
Angeles and help start MetroLight Studios, which gained a reputation for award winning

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design, visual effects and computer animation. With Martino as one of the principal
creative directors, MetroLight won an Academy Award in 1991 for visual effects on
“Total Recall.” That same year, Martino won a Primetime Emmy Award for his design
and direction for the main title sequence of ABC’s “World of Discovery.” During his
tenure at MetroLight, Martino directed animation for commercials, film and broadcast,
which enabled the studio to push the CG boundaries by pioneering technologies in
motion capture and the integration of animation with live action.

Driven by a desire to develop and produce original content Martino joined 7th
Level Studios in 1994 as the vice president of creative, where he developed entertainment
and educational properties for the interactive marketplace. Martino’s work with Howie
Mandel on the “Lil’ Howie’s Fun House” series, and his collaboration with Terry Gilliam
and Eric Idle on “Monty Python’s Quest for the Holy Grail” and “Monty Python’s The
Meaning of Life” netted awards and recognition in the field of interactive entertainment.

In 1997 Martino helped start a second studio, Click 3X LA, where he was a
partner and animation director. Click 3X LA gained a reputation for the design and
production of visual effects and animation for television, theatrical and Imax films. With
a focus and passion for character animation Martino directed commercials for clients that
ranged from Toyota to Terminix. His leadership culminated with his animation direction
on a made-for-TV movie that combined a host of animated characters, including a 10foot
troll, into the live action film. Martino creatively supervised all aspects of the
production with his 40-person crew, from modeling and animation through lighting and
final compositing.

Martino came to Blue Sky Studios in 2002 as the art director for the feature film
“Robots,” collaborating with Chris Wedge and William Joyce to create the picture’s
wholly imagined, whimsical world.

Martino was an integral part in the promotion of “Robots,” through his directing a
public service announcement with the film’s characters. He traveled the globe presenting
the film to press, participating in an unprecedented post-release press junket focusing
purely on the visuals Martino helped to create for the film.

28



CINCO PAUL (Screenwriter) went to Yale University and graduated summa
cum laude, which he only gets to bring up in bios like this, so cut him some slack. Then
he got an M.F.A. in screenwriting from USC. He sold his first script soon afterwards,
then toiled away for years in obscurity on unproduced scripts until he met his future
writing partner Ken Daurio at a church play. Teaming up with Ken led to the movies
“Bubble Boy,” “The Santa Clause 2,” “College Road Trip,” and now DR. SEUSS’
HORTON HEARS A WHO! Cinco currently lives in Agoura Hills, California with his
wife and three children.

KEN DAURIO (Screenwriter) moved to Hollywood at the age of eight with
dreams of becoming a filmmaker. A year later he was well on his way, making animated
short films and special effects-driven movies with his secondhand Super-8 camera.
Straight out of high school he began directing music videos for up-and-coming bands like
Blink 182, AFI and Jimmy Eat World. Six years and over 100 music videos later he
teamed up with Cinco Paul to write his first feature script. Its sale solidified his
partnership with Paul, and the two have been writing together ever since. His other
produced films include “Bubble Boy,” “The Santa Clause 2” and “College Road Trip.”
The chance to work on DR. SEUSS’ HORTON HEARS A WHO! has been a dream
come true for Daurio, as it was his favorite childhood book. Daurio currently lives in
Westlake Village, California with his wife and three children.

BOB GORDON (Producer) line produced the highly successful “Ice Age 2: The
Meltdown,” and co-produced the critically acclaimed “Robots,” both for 20th Century
Fox. His credits in animation also include “Titan A.E.” and the original “Ice Age.”

A Southern California native, Gordon spent many Saturdays as a child in several
of Hollywood’s historic, opulent theaters, where he developed a love of film. With a
bachelor’s degree from California State Polytechnic University at Pomona and postgraduate
work in computer science, he worked as a computer analyst for WED, the
engineering arm of the Disney organization. He began his film career on “Three Men
and a Baby,” working in production accounting at the Disney Studios.

29



Gordon worked on James Cameron’s “True Lies” and “The Abyss,” and on
“Hoffa,” “The Two Jakes” “Bulworth,” “Say Anything,” “Waterworld,” “The Chamber,”
“Taking Care of Business,” “Hot Shots Part Deux,” “Back in the USSR,” “When a Man
Loves a Woman,” “For the Boys” and “Alien Nation.”

AUDREY GEISEL (Executive Producer) is the president and CEO of Dr. Seuss
Enterprises. Formed in 1993 to maintain the quality and integrity of the Dr. Seuss
trademark, Dr. Seuss Enterprises has overseen the production of all licensed, posthumous
adaptations of Dr. Seuss’s work.

Mrs. Geisel is also president of the Dr. Seuss Fund and Dr. Seuss Foundation,
which donate funds to a variety of causes and institutions that promote literacy,
including: Family Literacy Foundation, National Center for Family Literacy, Rolling
Readers USA, and San Diego, Council on Literacy. In addition, the Dr. Seuss Fund and
the Dr. Seuss Foundation have donated funds to numerous organizations and foundations.

Mrs. Geisel oversees the many literary and entertainment projects based on Dr.
Seuss works, as well as philanthropic endeavors that pay tribute to the late author.

CHRISTOPHER MELEDANDRI (Executive Producer), after spending thirteen
years at 20th Century Fox, most recently as President of Fox Animation, Christopher
Meledandri is currently President and CEO of Illumination Entertainment.

In 1998, Fox acquired full ownership of Blue Sky Studios after Meledandri saw
the opportunity to move their core creative team into the production of feature films.

After supervising Blue Sky’s reorganization and expansion, Meledandri began
production on “Ice Age,” a project he had personally developed and saw as a great fit for
director Chris Wedge. “Ice Age” starred Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary
and Jack Black. Meledandri served as executive producer on “Ice Age,” as well as the
Academy Award nominated spin-off short “Gone Nutty.”

Fox Animation and Blue Sky followed “Ice Age” with “Robots,” which was
directed by Wedge and Executive Produced by Meledandri. “Robots” included the
voices of Robin Williams, Ewan McGregor, Halle Berry, Greg Kinnear, Amanda Bynes
and Mel Brooks.

30



In 2006, Meledandri executive produced “Ice Age: The Meltdown,” directed by
Carlos Saldanha. The film became the third highest grossing film of 2006, earning $637
million worldwide. The film’s original cast members were joined in the sequel by Queen
Latifah and Seann William Scott.

Meledandri supervised “The Simpsons Movie,” produced by James L. Brooks,
Matt Groening and Al Jean.

Meledandri is a member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
He attended Dartmouth College and is a board member of The Governance Council of
The Kenter Canyon Elementary School in Brentwood, California, as well as a member of
the board of trustees at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut.

JOHN POWELL (Music) landed a job composing music for commercials and
television at London’s Air-Edel Music in 1988. There, he worked alongside composers
Hans Zimmer and Patrick Doyle, and made his first foray into feature films by assisting
Doyle with the score of “Into the West” and writing cues for Zimmer on “White Fang.”

Adhering to just one musical style is not in Powell’s nature. Before moving to Los
Angeles, he played for more than 15 years with the Fabulistics, a London soul band that
performed for everyone, from Lady Diana to denizens of the local pub.

Powell’s hauntingly thematic score for the Nicolas Cage/John Travolta film
“Face/Off” put him on the map. Next he wrote romantic melodies with a quirky comedic
sensibility for Ben Affleck and Sandra Bullock in “Forces of Nature.” For DreamWorks’
animated “Antz,” featuring the voices of Woody Allen and Sharon Stone, Powell created
a musical mélange of jazz, Latin and classical sounds with a highly imaginative theme.

Next came “Endurance,” developed and co-produced by Terrence Malick. In an
almost wordless film, Powell’s score serves as dialogue, conveying the central
character’s joy, dignity and struggle. For the animated films “Shrek” and “Shrek 2,”
Powell impressed audiences and critics alike in creating a sophisticated and intelligent
score. He again won the hearts of audiences with the poignant score for “I Am Sam.”

Since then, Powell has scored a wide variety of films, including “Alfie,” “Be
Cool,” “Chicken Run,” and the action films “The Italian Job,” “The Bourne Identity,”

31



“The Bourne Supremacy,” “The Bourne Ultimatum,” “Paycheck” and “X-Men: The Last

Stand.”

Other credits include acclaimed drama “United 93,” “Drumline,” and the recent

romantic comedy “P.S. I Love You.” He composed the scores for a trio of hit animated

films – Fox’s “Robots” and “Ice Age: The Meltdown,” and Warner Bros.’ “Happy Feet.”

Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears A Who! TM & © 2008 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. Dr. Seuss, Horton Hears A
Who! and Dr. Seuss Characters TM & © 1954, 2008 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. All Rights Reserved.

Permission is hereby granted to newspapers and periodicals to reproduce this

text in articles publicizing the distribution of the Motion Picture.

All other use is strictly prohibited, including sale, duplication, or other transfers of this material.

This press kit, in whole or in part, must not be leased, sold, or given away.

 

 

TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX ANIMATION
Presents
A BLUE SKY STUDIOS PRODUCTION


JIM CARREY
STEVE CARELL
WILL ARNETT
SETH ROGEN
DAN FOGLER
JONAH HILL
AMY POEHLER
ISLA FISHER
JAIME PRESSLY
CHARLES OSGOOD
And
CAROL BURNETT


Directed by......... JIMMY HAYWARD & STEVE MARTINO
Screenplay by....................... CINCO PAUL & KEN DAURIO
Based on.................................... THE STORY BY DR. SEUSS
Produced by ............BOB GORDON & BRUCE ANDERSON
Executive Producers ......AUDREY GEISEL, CHRIS WEDGE
Executive Producer.............................CHRIS MELEDANDRI
Music by .........................................................JOHN POWELL
Editor ..........................................................TIM NORDQUIST
Art Director...........................................THOMAS CARDONE



Production Managers .......... Samantha Berg, Chris DiGiovanni
CG Supervisor.............................................Robert V. Cavaleri
Research and Development Director .....................Carl Ludwig
Chief Scientist...........................................Eugene Troubetzkoy
Senior Supervising Animator ..........................Mike Thurmeier
Lighting Director .............................................. David Esneault
Head of Story .....................................................Ricardo Curtis
Sculpting Supervisor...............................................Mike Defeo
Modeling Supervisor.................................................David Mei
Character Technical Direction Supervisor..Stephen Unterfranz
Fur Supervisor........................................................ Eric Maurer
Materials Supervisors..................... Michael Eringis, Brian Hill
Layout Supervisors ..................... Robert Cardone, Arden Chan
Animation Supervisors......... James Bresnahan, Galen Tan Chu
...........................................................................Aaron Hartline
Effects Supervisor................................................ Kirk Garfield
Supervisor-Lighting Development.................. Andrew Beddini
Production Supervisor- Story...........................Patrick Worlock
Production Supervisor-Animation ....................... Anthony Nisi
Post Production Supervisor.............................. Jeannine Berger
Editorial Consultant................................................Kent Beyda


Camera Designer ....................................Gabriel Schlumberger
Script Supervisor ................................................Brett Hoffman
Casting by............................................. Christian Kaplan, CSA


Voice Cast

Horton.......................................................................Jim Carrey
Mayor .....................................................................Steve Carell
Kangaroo ............................................................. Carol Burnett
Vlad.........................................................................Will Arnett
Morton .....................................................................Seth Rogen
Councilman/Yummo Wickersham .......................... Dan Fogler
Dr. Mary Lou Larue.................................................. Isla Fisher
Tommy ......................................................................Jonah Hill
Sally O'Malley......................................................Amy Poehler
Mrs. Quilligan...................................................... Jaime Pressly
Narrator.............................................................Charles Osgood
Rudy ........................................................................ Josh Flitter
Miss Yelp................................................................ Niecy Nash
JoJo.................................................................Jesse McCartney
Hedy/Hooly ...............................................Shelby Adamowsky
Old Time Who......................................................... Jack Angel
Helen .....................................................Caitlin Rose Anderson
Heather ............................................................Emily Anderson
Town Cryer..............................................................Jan Rabson
Who ....................................................................... John Cygan
Another Who..........................................................Jess Harnell
Who Mom........................................................Debi Derryberry
Hildy/Holly............................................ Samantha Raye Droke
Who Kid...............................................................Karen Disher
Wickersham Guard 1.........................................Marshall Efron
Willie Bear...............................................................Bill Farmer
Joe................................................................... Jason Fricchione
Who Girl..................................................Heather Goldenhersh
Helga .................................................................. Selena Gomez
Obnoxious Who................................................James Hayward
Katie ..........................................................................Joey King
Heidi/Haley....................................................Christina Martino
Hanna....................................................................Ellie Martino
Glummox Mom ..............................................Laraine Newman
Wickersham Guard 2..........................................Tim Nordquist
Angela ................................................Colleen O'Shaughnessey
Jessica......................................................................Laura Ortiz
The Dentist ............................................................Joe Pasquale
Additional Voices.....................Isabella Acres, Mona Marshall
.................... Connor Anderson, Mickie McGowan, Jack Angel
......... Laraine Newman, Bob Bergen, Colleen O'Shaughnessey
.....................John Cygan, Madison Pettis, Madison Davenport
.......... Jan Rabson, Debi Derryberry, Grace Rolek, Bill Farmer
........ Jennessa Rose, Teresa Ganzel, Ariel Winter, Jess Harnell
.................... Shelby Adamowsky, Sherry Lynn, Elena Martino
...................... Danny Mann, Heather Goldenhersh, Jan Rabson



Story

Story Consultants.....................................Mike Reiss, Jon Vitti
Story Artists .................................Jeff Biancalana, Cal Brunker
....Jony Chandra, Karen Disher, Eric Favela, William H. Frake
............. Martin Lee Fuller, Tony Maki, Moroni, Chris Renaud
..............................................................................Rafael Zentil
Lead Previs Animatic Artist.......................... Andrew H. Leung
Animatic Artist ............................................. Stephen Warbrick
Additional Story Artists .................................. Stephanie Arnett
Crystal Chesney-Thompson........ Edmund Fong, Frank Marino
.......Rich Moore, Wilbert Plijnaar, JG Quintel, Jeffrey Siergey
Production Assistants......................Ed Corcoran, Chad Walker


Art

Manager .............................................. Angela Calimag Macias
Character Designers....................... Sang Jun Lee, Jason Sadler
Set Design.............................. Nash Dunnigan, Michael Knapp
.........Kyle Macnaughton, Jake Parker, Guillermo 'Willie' Real
.............................................................................. Lizette Vega
Lead Color Design ........................................ Daisuke Tsutsumi
Color Design/Matte Painting ...............................Ron DeFelice
.......Robert MacKenzie, Di Peter Nguyen, Vincent Di Nguyen
Visual Development ..........................Dave Catrow, Shaun Tan
Sculptor.................................................................. Vicki Saulls
Junior Sculptor....................................................Alena Wooten
PreViz Modeling......... Jen Woodbury Downs, Thomas Leavitt
...............Gary Telfer, James Willingham III, Jay Jungmu You
Additional Sculptors ..................... Brien Hindman, Joanne Lee
...............................................................................Elliott Arkin
Additional Character Design........................Robert MacKenzie
...............................................................................Jason Sadler
Additional Color Design...................... Richard Vander Wende
...................................................................... Robert E. Stanton
Additional Visual Development............................. Greg Couch
Barry Jackson, Xiangyuan Jie, Clayton Stillwell, Jon Townley
Production Assistants............. Jacqueline Jones, Cindy Slattery


Modeling and Character Technical Direction

Manager...............................................................Chris Kuwata
Character Modeling Lead ................................Daniel Williams
Environmental Modeling Lead .....................Salvatore Melluso
Senior Modelers........................ Shaun Cusick, Brien Hindman
..................................................................Alexander Levenson
Modelers ............Ian M. Burkard, Juan Pablo Chen, Tony Jung
................................................Sook Yeon Lee, Jenga Mwendo
...................... Adam McMahon, Edward Robbins, Dave Strick
..............................Sabina Suarez, Brent Wong, Motoko Wada
Technical Assistant .......................................Cleveland Hibbert


Character Technical Direction

Senior Technical Directors ............................ Erik O. Malvarez
.............................................. Scotty Sharp , Joseph 'Jerril' Yoo
Technical Directors.................... Jeff Brodsky, Marco Burbano
... Brendan Condit, Casey Dame, Jason Davies, Mark Edwards
..............Ian Etra, James Gu, Todd E.J. Hill, Benjamin Kilgore
..................................... Yu-Li Liao, Aaron 'Noodles' Walsman


Technical Assistant/Environmental Rigging .......... Jane Chatot
Production Coordinator - Modeling and Rigging ......................
.....................................................................Rachel Kate Miller


Layout

Managers ....................................Sean Murphy, Fred Weinberg
Senior Workbook .................................................. Jeff Beazley
Workbook ............David Figliola, Bill Hodman, Tom Humber
..........................................Ken Lee, Alex Li, Kevin Thomason
Senior Final Layout...............................................Jen Gilchrist
Final Layout........................... Daniel Barlow, Aaron DiMunno
............Kimberly Gilbert, Karyn V.B. Monschein, Gary Telfer
Technical Lead ..............................................Karyn Monschein
Technical Assistant............................................Kevin Higuera
Production Assistant.......................................MirandaJackson


Assembly

Manager-Assembly/Production Engineering/Lighting Lock.....
................................................................... Irka B. Seng-Bloom
Lead Technical Directors.................Gareth Porter, Bryan Useo
Technical Directors.................... Inna Agujen, Melanie Martini
............................................................................ James Parente
Technical Assistants ............................ Isaac Holze, Tridip Ray
.....................................................................Antelmo Villarreal


Production Engineering

Lead Production Engineer ........................................Tim Speltz
Sr. Technical Director.................................... Jayme Wilkinson
Technical Director .......................................... Michael Toriello
Production Assistant-Assembly/Production
Engineering/Lighting Lock..................................Jacob Carlson


Materials

Manager-Materials & Fur.................................. Denise Rottina
Technical Directors.............................................Ian Butterfield
....................................Diana Diriwaechter, Christopher Moore
.............. Baaron Schulte. Daniel Ken Shimmyo, Josh Smeltzer
................................. Keith Stichweh, Radhika Thirunarayanan
..................................... Nikki Tomaino, Tom Wichitsripornkul
Additional Technical Directors..........................Heather Brown
.................................................Raphael Matto, Cosku Odzemir


Fur

Lead Technical Directors-Fur........................... Jamie Williams
............................................. Mark Bajuk, Sheldon H.M. Chow
Feathers Development ............................................ Aaron Ross
Grass Development...........................................Kaho Albert Yu
Cloverfield Development ...................................... Sean Palmer
Technical Directors..................David Barksdale, Jon Campbell
........................................... Brian P. Dean, Tamara Garabedian
.................................................... Monika Sawyer, Aamir Tarin
Additional Technical Directors............................. Victor Banks
........Jonathan Davis, Nancy Thanh Dinh, Christine Gatchalian
........................... Eric Grimenstein, In Soo Lee, John Patterson
.........................................Andrew Schneider, Terry Ziegelman
Production Assistants Fur and Materials ...........Daren Tillinger



............................................Rachel Kate Miller, Joselly Torres


Animation
Animation Character Leads

Horton...................................................................David Torres
Mayor........................................................................Galen Chu
Kangaroo and Rudy .....................Juan Carlos Navarro-Carrion
Vlad....................................................................Aaron Hartline
Jojo....................................................................... Hans Dastrup
Wickershams..........................................................Mika Ripatti
Mayor's wife and Miss Yelp ...............................Jessica Sances
Dr. Larue.............................................................Royce Wesley
Councilmen of Whoville.................Melvin Tan and Jeff Gabor
Morton .......................................... Leif Jeffers and David Peng
The Whos.........Mark C. Harris, Jerod Chirico and Nick Bruno
Lead-Character Rig Performance.................... David Gallagher
Technical Lead........................................Matthew D. Simmons
Animators ..........James Campbell, Scott Carroll, Rylan Davies
....... Paul Downs, Ryan Denniston, Paul F. Diaz, Scott Farrell
.............................Jackie Fortin, Moonsung Lee, Lluis Llobera
................ Robin 'Orca' Luera, Chip Lotierzo, Wesley Mandell
......................Jason S. Martinsen, Rich McKain, Pete Paquette
.........................David S. Pent, Antonin Plante, Robyne Powell
............................. Gregory Rizzi, Derek Rozmes, Tom Saville
..............David 'Bloke' Sloss, Zach Torok, Michael C. Walling
Production Engineer-Animation ........................Oliver Staeubli
Technical Assistants/Crowd Animation. Jen Woodbury Downs
............................Robert Huth, Venece Lyman, Max Perelman
............................................................ Gwynne Olson-Wheeler
Animation Training Development ....................... Pete Paquette
Production Coordinator................................ Elizabeth Malpelli
Production Assistant .......................................Lauren Montuori
Additional Animators ........................................ Aja Bogdanoff
............................ Dan Barker, Heather Carpini, Andrew Coats
... Brendan Condit, Bertrand Chung, Casey Dame, Pete Devlin
........Nathan Engelhardt, Ian Etra, Gordana Fersini, Lance Fite
......... Michael Galbraith, Tamara Garabedian, Curran Giddens
................Adam Green, Ryan Hobbiebrunken, Martin Jimenez
.........................Veerapatra Jinanavin, Anthea Kerou, Jeff Kim
...................... Aaron Koressel, Eric Luhta, Stephen Melagrano
............... Kyle Mohr, Ken Music, Jacob Patrick, Jacob Palmer
... Max Perelman, Rebecca Perez, Amila Puhala, Patrik Puhala
....................... Raymond Ross, Shahbaaz Shah, Miles Southan
........................ Jason Taylor, Becki Tower, Phan Wiantrakoon
Additional Technical Assistants....Jason Davies, Nick Gibbons


Effects

Senior Technical Directors ................................... Rhett Collier
................................................. Jamie Kirschenbaum, Alen Lai
Senior Animator.......................................John David Thornton
Technical Directors...........................Sean Palmer, Jim Parente
....................................................John Patterson, Elvia Pinkhas
.................................................Matt Roach, Andrew Schneider
Additional Effects ............................Mark Adams, Hugo Ayala
........................ David Barksdale, Simon Brown, Jon Campbell
..................................... Gates Roberg-Clark, Prapanch Swamy


Production Coordinator ............................................Jinyi Baird


Lighting

Manager Lighting & Paint..............................Sean M. Murphy
Lighting Leads..................................................... Jim Gettinger
.............................................Rosalinda Malibiran, Dan O'Brien
.......................................................... Jeeyun Sung, Haji Uesato
Senior Technical Directors ............ Lynn Bacino, Daniel Cayer
.............................. Eldar Cholich, Jacob Richards, Aaron Ross
Technical Directors............... Joan Cabot, Rafael Castelblanco
....................Sheng-Fang Chen, Jonathan Davis, Brian P. Dean
................................. Nancy Thanh Dinh, Harold 'Roldy' Fraga
.................Christine Gatchalian, Youngwoong Jang, Jina Kang
.................... Jay Jungmu You, Arun Ram-Mohan, Jon Schroth
............Dann Tarmy, Ellen Trinh, Sergei Volkov, Matt Wilson
........................................................................ Terry Ziegelman
Additional Technical Directors........... Jodi Bade, Jen Gilchrist
................................ Nickie Huai, Tony Jung, Brett McConnell
.................................................... Monika Sawyer, Brent Wong


Paint

Digital Paint Lead..............................................John Siczewicz
Digital Paint Artists....................Victor Banks,Ari Rubenstein
Additional Digital Paint Artists ......... Marion Engelbach-Ennis
.......................................................Jud Estes, Stewart Pomeroy
Production Assistant Lighting & Paint ....................Kevin Daly


Rendering Technical Support

Senior Technical Support Lead .................Danielle Cambridge
Technical Lead ..............................................Michael Kingsley
Technical Assistants ............. Mark Adams, Heather M. Brown
.................Gates Roberg-Clark, Jay-Vincent Jones, Tridip Ray
..........................................................Paul-Jozef 'PJ' Torrevillas


Editorial

Manager.......................................................... Jason Fricchione
Associate Editor................................................... Randy Trager
First Assistant Editor ........................................ Chris Campbell
Second Assistant Editors...............Erin Crackel, Kathy Graves
....................................................................... John W. Wheeler
Apprentice Editor .................................................Chad Walker
Production Coordinator ......................................Jennifer Kagel
Editorial Systems Engineer......................Gerard Sam-Zee-Moi


Production

Scheduling Coordinator................................Brian Grimenstein
Manager-Character Group.................................Fred Weinberg
Production Assistant-Character Group ................Jacob Carlson
Assistant to Directors....................................... Dave LaMattina
Assistant to the Producers..................................... Mona Falvey
Assistant to Production Managers ........................Sharon Flynn
Assistant to Chris Meledandri .............................. Kelly Martin
Assistant to Chris Wedge .............................Victoria Dedvukaj
Additional Production Support.............................Tansal Arnas
................Jessica Marie Ferber, Michelle Lauricella, Lisa Durr
.......... Amanda Jones, Kristin Labriola, Kane Lee, Jess Siegler



............................................ Chris Siemesko, Deborah R. Scott
Production Interns....................Andrea Cignarella, Evan Curtis
................................Greg Lewis, Justin Mandel, Colin Mixson
......... Matthew Morgenthaler, Dana Piazza, Joseph C. Thomas
SPECIAL THANKS TO.................. Herb Cheyette, Linda Hill


Software Development

Software Managera ................................... Maurice van Swaaij
Senior Research Associates ......... Adam Burr, Richard Hadsell
...................................... Michael K. Reed, Trevor G. Thomson
Research Associates...............Hugo M. Ayala, Justin Bisceglio
......................Jitendra Borse, Heather Bradford, Jennifer Brola
...................................... Doug Letterman, Vinoad Senguttuvan
Software Tools Lead.........................................Joseph Higham
Production Management Software........Kevin "KP" Porterfield


Systems

Head of Systems ............................................... Andrew Siegel
Systems Administrators........Joe Bonomo, Alex John Cuthbert
.....Tanika Grant, Jack Ham, George Jacobs, Mary Lynn Kirby
Systems Technical Assistant ................................. Rajiv Miller

POST PRODUCTION

Supervising Sound Editor & Sound Designer......Randy Thom
Supervising Sound Editor ................................ Dennis Leonard
Sound Re-recording Mixers.........Randy Thom, Gary A. Rizzo
ADR Supervisor...................................................Jonathan Null
ADR Editor........................................................... Steve Slanec
Sound Effects Editors ................ Colette Dahanne, Pete Horner
..........................................................Kyrsten Mate, Mac Smith
Foley Supervisor...................................................Suzanne Fox
Foley Editors...................... Andrea Gard, Jeremy Paul Bowker
Assistant Supervising Sound Editor........................Coya Elliott
Assistant Sound Designer.................................Dustin Cawood
Assistant ADR Editor .......................................Brian Chumney
Sound Effects Recordist........................ Jessica Lemes da Silva
Foley Artists..............Jana Vance, Ellen Heuer, Dennie Thorpe
............................................................................. Ronni Brown
Foley Mixers................................Frank Rinella, Sean England
Foley Recordists ................................ Frank Clary, Scott Wiser
Mix Technician.......................................................Juan Peralta
Digital Transfer................................................Jonathan Greber
......................................Christopher Barron, John Countryman
Machine Room Operators........... Ron Roumas, Jurgen Scharpf
Video Services ...................... Ed Dunkley, John "J.T." Torrijos
Engineering Services ........................ James Austin, Doug Ford
Digital Editorial Services...........David Hunter, Leffert Lefferts
Client Services ...................Eva Porter, Mike Lane, Gordon Ng
Post Production Sound Accountant................Megan Tompkins
Digital Intermediate by ................................................. EFILM
Digital Colorist .............................................. Natasha Leonnet
DI Producer..........................................................Eileen Godoy
DI Editor ................................................................ Martha Pike
Digital Colorist Assistant.......................................Marc Lulkin
DI Production Assistant ............................. Justin Worthington
DI Production Assistant ............................................ Matt Hull


Deluxe Color Timer................................................. Jim Passon


Blue Sky Studios

Chief Operating Officer.........................................Brian Keane
Director – Finance .........................................Jason Wasserman
Director - Human Resources ................................. Linda Zazza
Director – Development ........................................Lisa Fragner
Editor-Development ........................................ James Palumbo
Manager-Development ....................................... Deanna Goetz
Studio Production Manager ............................. Maria Criscuolo
Manager-Marketing and Communications ...............................
...................................................................Christina Witoshkin
Recruiter ..................................................... Sabrina de los Rios
Coordinator -Human Resources ..........Christopher A. Kappler
Assistant to Brian Keane and Jason Wasserman .......................
..........................................................................Theresa Brower
Accounting ..... Marie Barnes, Courtney Hazel, Daniela Polcari
Operations/Facilities......................... Diane Shasta-Dominguez
................... Kim Chase, Andres Lavin, Susan Goldson-Wright
......................................................................... Quitten Johnson


MUSIC

Supervising Music Editor ..............................TOM CARLSON
Additional Music and Programming by....................................
........... JAMES MCKEE SMITH, JOHN ASHTON THOMAS
Orchestra Conducted by .............................PETE ANTHONY
Score Performed by ...................................................................
........................ THE HOLLYWOOD STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Concert Master ............................................. BRUCE DUKOV
Orchestral Contractor ...................................GINA ZIMMITTI
Vocal Contractor & Conductor..................................................
............................................. EDIE LEHMANN BODDICKER
Orchestrations by ......................... JOHN ASHTON THOMAS
....KEVIN KLIESCH, DAVE METZGER, RANDY KERBER
...................................... BRAD DECHTER, CONRAD POPE,
............................... RICK GIOVANAZZO, JANE CORNISH,
................................. PETE ANTHONY, ANDREW KINNEY
Music Preparation by..................................MARK GRAHAM,
...........................................JOANN KANE MUSIC SERVICE
Recorded and Mixed by ............................SHAWN MURPHY
Additional Recording by ................................. DAN LERNER
Score Recorded and Mixed at ...................................................
.......................................THE NEWMAN SCORING STAGE,


............................................... TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
........................ AND 5 CAT STUDIOS, LOS ANGELES, CA
Recordist............................................................TIM LAUBER
Engineer................................................... DENIS ST AMAND
Stage Managers ..TOM STEEL FRANCESCO PERLANGELI
Scoring Editor:...................................... DAVID CHANNING
Scoring Digital Recordist: ........................... ERIK SWANSON
Score Production Coordinator: ............ GERMAINE FRANCO
Featured Musicians
Guitar and Dulcimer ............................... GEORGE DOERING
Hand Percussion ....................................... MICHAEL FISHER
Trumpet ..................................HARRY KIM, RICK BAPTIST



SONGS:

QUICKIE
Written by Thomas Feuer
Performed by Thomas Foyer
Courtesy of Crucial Music


SWINGVILLE SASHAY
Written and Performed by Muff & Rezz
Courtesy of Extreme Music


AGUA MELAO
Written and Performed by Gilberto Candido
Courtesy of Extreme Music


THE BLUE DANUBE
Written by Johann Strauss II


CAN’T FIGHT THIS FEELING
Written by Kevin Cronin


Soundtrack Available on VARÉSE SARABANDE [Logo]


2D Animation by ....................................... HOUSE OF COOL


BLUE SKY BABIES ...........................James Henry Anderson
..............................Davin John Barksdale, Lillian Leah Barlow
.........................Taryn Kathleen Bruno, Hannah Sophie Carroll
............... Hayden Grace Acri Cavaleri, Bailey Angelina Cayer
.................Lily Clara Day, T.B.D. Etra, Milo Alexander Eaton
.........................Teak Rocket Esneault, Chloe Esther Gallagher
.....................Sophie Lynne Garfield, Madeleine Jane Gilchrist
...............................Laila Nicole Goetz, Jackson Rock Hartline
... Connor Robert Hill, Makayla Lewis, Julian H.L. Murchison
..................... Colin Hennessy Murphy, David Navarro-Marsili
......................Landon Connor Paquette, Emma Grace Paquette
.......................................... Miles Parker, Ruby Clara Patterson
.........Winslow Alexander Martin Porter, Jackson Ryan Powell
....................................Maggie Kuo-Reed, Elise Mirelle Sadler
...................... Gordon Donald Travers, Katelyn Ivy Thurmeier
.................... Vanessa Agujen Veloso, Kiril Sergeivich Volkov
.............. Max Martin Wasserman, Benjamin Peyton Weinberg
..............................................................Serra Holland Worlock


Prints by DELUXE® KODAK FILM STOCK


DOLBY DTS


Approved No. 44194 (MPAA Globe)
MOTION PICTURE
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA


IATSE "Bug"

© 2008 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation in all

territories except Brazil, Italy, Japan, Korea and Spain.

© 2008 TCF Hungary Film Rights Exploitation Limited
Liability Company and Twentieth Century Fox Film
Corporation in Brazil, Italy, Japan, Korea and Spain.

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation is the author of this
motion picture for purposes of copyright and other laws.

The events, characters and firms depicted in this photoplay are
fictitious. ny similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or to
actual events or firms is purely coincidental.

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other applicable laws, and any unauthorized duplication,
distribution or exhibition of this motion picture could result in
criminal prosecution as well as civil liability.

NOTE: CREDITS NOT FINAL OR COMPLETE
AT PRESS TIME
 

 

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