« June Auto Sales | Main | Recent Posts »

Harry Potter Order of The Phoenix

July 11

Production Notes in English and Spanish and Credits 

It has been a long, lonely summer for Harry Potter as he awaits his fifth year of

study at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It’s bad enough that he must

endure living with the odious Dursleys, but he hasn’t received even a note from his

classmates and closest friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. And there has not

been any word from anyone in the aftermath of his confrontation with the evil Lord

Voldemort. The letter that does arrive is not the kind for which he was hoping—

pronouncing that Harry is about to be expelled from Hogwarts for illegally using magic

outside of school and in the presence of a Muggle, namely his obnoxious cousin, Dudley.

Never mind that it was in defense against an unprovoked and inexplicable attack by two

Dementors.

Harry’s only hope is to defend himself at what amounts to hardly more than a

kangaroo court orchestrated by the Minister of Magic, Cornelius Fudge, who has his own

reasons for wanting the young wizard to be gone for good. Much to Fudge’s chagrin,

Harry is acquitted—thanks largely to the intervention of Hogwarts’ venerable

Headmaster, Albus Dumbledore—but his return to Hogwarts is, for the first time,

apprehensive and uncomfortable. Harry has learned that much of the wizarding

community has been led to believe that the story of the teenager’s recent encounter with

Voldemort is an outright lie, putting Harry’s integrity in question.

Feeling ostracized and alone, Harry is beset by nightmares that seem to foretell

sinister events. Worse, the one person whose counsel he needs most, Professor

Dumbledore, is suddenly acting strangely distant from the confused and hurt young

wizard.

Meanwhile, in an effort to keep an eye on Dumbledore and keep the Hogwarts

students—especially Harry—in line, Fudge has appointed a new Defense Against the

1

 

 

 

Dark Arts teacher, the duplicitous Professor Dolores Umbridge. But Professor

Umbridge’s “Ministry-approved” course of defensive magic leaves the young wizards

woefully unprepared to defend themselves against the Dark Forces threatening them. So,

at the prompting of Hermione and Ron, Harry is convinced to take matters into his own

hands. Meeting secretly with a small group of students who name themselves

“Dumbledore’s Army,” Harry teaches them how to defend themselves against the Dark

Arts, preparing the courageous young wizards for the extraordinary battle that he knows

lies ahead.

Warner Bros. Pictures Presents A Heyday Films Production, “Harry Potter and

the Order of the Phoenix.” The film stars Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson,

Helena Bonham Carter, Robbie Coltrane, Warwick Davis, Ralph Fiennes, Michael

Gambon, Brendan Gleeson, Richard Griffiths, Jason Isaacs, Gary Oldman, Alan

Rickman, Fiona Shaw, Maggie Smith, Imelda Staunton, David Thewlis, Emma

Thompson and Julie Walters.

The film was directed by David Yates and produced by David Heyman and David

Barron. Michael Goldenberg wrote the screenplay, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling.

Lionel Wigram served as executive producer.

The behind-the-scenes creative team included director of photography Slawomir

Idziak, production designer Stuart Craig, editor Mark Day, costume designer Jany

Temime and composer Nicholas Hooper.

Concurrently with the film’s debut in conventional theatres, “Harry Potter and the

Order of the Phoenix”: An IMAX 3D Experience will be released in IMAX theatres

worldwide. Using proprietary 2D to 3D conversion technology, scenes from the movie’s

finale (approximately 20 minutes) have been converted into An IMAX 3D Experience®

,

the most immersive cinematic 3D in the world. The film has been digitally re-mastered

into The IMAX Experience® with proprietary IMAX DMR® (Digital Re-mastering)

technology. A special on-screen cue—a green icon of flashing glasses across the bottom

of the screen—will alert moviegoers when to put the 3D glasses on, and a red icon will

appear, indicating when the glasses should be taken off. IMAX®, IMAX® 3D, IMAX

2

 

 

 

DMR®, IMAX MPX®, The IMAX Experience® and An IMAX 3D Experience® are

trademarks of IMAX Corporation.

“Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” will be distributed worldwide by

Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.

This film has been rated “PG-13” by the MPAA for “sequences of fantasy

violence and frightening images.”

www.harrypotterorderofthephoenix.com

For downloadable general press information and photos from

HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX,

please visit: http://press.warnerbros.com

ABOUT THE PRODUCTION

A NEW ORDER

The fifth year of study at Hogwarts School presents a turning point, not only for

Harry Potter but for his friends and classmates as well. No longer children, they are

suddenly faced with the choices and challenges of young adulthood…and the

consequences that come with them. Harry—dealing with the return of Lord Voldemort

and the death of his friend Cedric Diggory—has been forced to grow up perhaps more

quickly than the others and is compelled to take on responsibilities he never could have

expected.

Making his entrance into the world of Harry Potter, director David Yates remarks,

“It was exciting to me that this story takes place at a time in the students’ lives when they

are maturing and everything is becoming more complicated. It is about rebellion and

about understanding the limits of adulthood; it’s about discovering how difficult the

world can become and how sometimes you have to make your own way in that world. So

it’s a blend of all the magic and fun that J.K. Rowling puts into her books and all the

wonderful and amazing things that have been set in motion in the previous films, together

3

 

 

 

with issues and ideas that are a bit more complex and touching on things that are quite

grown up.”

David Heyman, the producer of all of the Harry Potter features, notes that the

nature of the story was what led him to choose Yates—an award-winning British

television director—to helm the fifth installment of the series. “David is a fantastic

actors’ director, and he has also shown that he can handle political subject matter in an

entertaining way. This is not a political film, per se, but the politics of the magic world

are very much at play here. We thought David would handle that brilliantly, and he has.

He came in with a great passion for the material and a great sense of the emotional

journey of the characters. He understood that, for all the spectacle, what we and the

audience connect with are the characters.

“It was really rewarding how the kids embraced him and he them,” Heyman adds.

“Like their characters, they are growing up and David treated them as equals. He

realized that they know their characters well and was always soliciting their ideas and

getting them to bring more of themselves to their roles in ways they hadn’t before. That

was exciting for them and for us.”

Returning in the role of Harry Potter, Daniel Radcliffe attests, “I loved working

with David. He is a delightful man, very soft-spoken, and yet I have never been pushed

as hard as I was on this film, partly because of the nature of the story and partly because

of his directing. He never settled for less; he always wanted me to go deeper, which was

exactly what I felt I needed. He is a brilliant director.”

“David is wicked; we got on really well with him,” agrees Rupert Grint, the actor

behind the role of Harry’s best mate, Ron Weasley. “He was quite a bit different from

the other directors because he has a more relaxed approach, but he always gave great

suggestions.”

Emma Watson, who plays Harry’s loyal friend Hermione Granger, adds, “It was

really lovely because David listened to what we had to say about our characters. He was

respectful of the fact that we have been playing these people for five films now. He

appreciated the history and the special relationship that Dan, Rupert and I share because

it adds truth to the friendship between Harry, Ron and Hermione. David really looks for

truth in all of the characters.”

4

 

 

 

Yates was working from a script by another newcomer to the fold, screenwriter

Michael Goldenberg. “I was thrilled when David Heyman called and asked me to be

involved,” Goldenberg recalls. “The great thing about working on a Harry Potter film is

that it’s something bigger than yourself, so there is no question of ego getting in the way.

I know it’s a cliché, but it’s a magical thing to be a part of what has become this amazing

phenomenon and to have a role in helping to bring it to the screen; I felt a great sense of

responsibility in the best sense of the word. David Heyman made it fun, which is what a

Harry Potter film should be, and Jo (J.K. Rowling) was incredibly sweet and could not

have been more generous in giving us room to make the best film possible. David Yates

was intent on keeping every moment of the story grounded in reality, and I think that’s

what makes the magic even more magical.

“Obviously, it was very important to stay true to the spirit of the book,”

Goldenberg observes. “This story, in particular, is so much about Harry’s journey. It’s

about Harry coming of age and realizing that things aren’t as black and white as they

initially appeared…and the adults he idealized are perhaps more flawed and human than

he thought. We wanted to examine those themes, not only with Harry but also with Ron

and Hermione. All of the kids are dealing with a more complex world than when they

first entered Hogwarts.”

In “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” Harry’s journey begins as he is

enduring another interminable summer with the Dursleys. Making the time even more

unbearable, he is feeling cut off from his closest friends, Ron and Hermione, who,

inexplicably, have not written to him all summer—not only hurtful but odd, especially

following the tumultuous and tragic events of the previous year.

Producer David Barron offers, “Poor Harry. After everything he’s been through,

he has been shut away in Little Whinging with absolutely no news from anybody. He

thinks everybody is ignoring him—Ron, Hermione, even Dumbledore—and I think,

coupled with the normal stresses of being a teenager, it’s just a bit much for him to bear.

It’s a side of Harry we haven’t seen before. He doesn’t start out quite as level-headed as

he has been in the past…not without justification, though.”

With that in mind, the insufferable bully Dudley Dursley has chosen the wrong

time to engage in his favorite pastime—trying to goad Harry—but their confrontation is

5

 

 

 

abruptly halted when, without warning, a pair of Dementors attack and Harry is forced to

produce a Patronus charm to save both their lives. Only moments later, a letter arrives at

Privet Drive informing Harry that he has been expelled from Hogwarts for his illegal use

of magic, a decree that delights the Dursleys even as it sends Harry to the edge of despair.

But hope is not lost. That night, a group of Aurors (Dark wizard catchers)—

including Alastor ‘Mad-Eye’ Moody, Kingsley Shacklebolt and don’t-call-me-

Nymphadora Tonks—arrive at his door and whisk him away, telling Harry that

Dumbledore has arranged for him to appeal his expulsion at a formal hearing at the

Ministry of Magic.

First, however, they must take a detour to a secret location, where Harry will

discover there has been a lot going on while he has been sequestered in Little Whinging.

Arriving at number twelve Grimmauld Place—which, if you don’t know is there, is not

there—Harry is reunited with Ron and Hermione. And it is there that he is first

introduced to the Order of the Phoenix, “a clandestine organization originally formed by

Dumbledore to combat the forces of evil represented by Voldemort,” David Heyman

explains. “They meet in secret, in large part because Fudge, who is in charge of the

Ministry of Magic, feels threatened by Dumbledore and is trying to repress stories of

Voldemort’s return. But those in the Order know that Voldemort is gathering followers

and his power is growing.”

Harry learns that his parents had been among the original Order of the Phoenix,

and counted among its current members are Molly & Arthur Weasley, Remus Lupin,

Severus Snape and, to his surprise and delight, Sirius Black, who has opened the Black

family home as the meeting place for the Order of the Phoenix. David Yates says, “Sirius

can’t go out because he’s still a wanted man. He can do very little to help, so the house is

his gift to the Order.”

Gary Oldman, who was introduced as Sirius Black in “Harry Potter and the

Prisoner of Azkaban,” relates, “Sirius is a man very much haunted by being wrongly

accused and imprisoned at Azkaban for so many years. He is emotionally rooted in the

old days when they were the young Order. In some ways, his relationship with Harry is

like reliving the past. Harry is so much like his father, James, who was Sirius’ best

6

 

 

 

friend, and Sirius is Harry’s godfather, which is something he does not take lightly. They

share a special relationship, which has progressively gotten stronger.”

“It’s similar for Harry,” adds Radcliffe. “Sirius sees a younger version of James

in Harry, and Harry gets to know more about his father through his relationship with

Sirius.”

Harry also sees the Order of the Phoenix as a way to connect to his past…and

more. “Officially, he’s not in the Order, but he already thinks of himself as very much a

part of it because so many of his friends are in it. It means a lot to him because, of

course, his parents were in the original Order. So it has quite an emotional importance to

Harry, as well as giving him a chance to fight Voldemort,” Radcliffe states.

MINISTERIAL PROCEEDINGS

Nevertheless, before Harry can think about fighting Voldemort, there is the matter

of getting reinstated at Hogwarts. Harry must defend his actions at a hearing at the

Ministry of Magic. The décor of the Ministry’s grand atrium is dominated by what

production designer Stuart Craig describes as “a Soviet-style propaganda poster of

Fudge.”

The designer adds that, despite the fact that people are literally flying down the

hallways and memos are sent by the wizards’ own brand of air mail, “the Ministry is a

bureaucracy. In England, government buildings tend to have a 19th century Victorian

design, which is very decorative. The Ministry is also underground, so one of the first

things we did was visit the oldest of the London Tube stations, many of which were done

with an extravagant use of decorative ceramic tile. We put that into the mix and invented

this underground world that is tunneled—because that’s what you would do

underground—and wrapped in polished black ceramic tile, which is very interesting

photographically. It was also challenging for (director of photography) Slawomir Idziak

because it’s highly reflective.”

The Ministry atrium represents the largest set ever built for the Harry Potter films,

at over 200-feet long, 120-feet wide and 30-feet high. It took more than 30,000 tiles to

cover it, all of which had to be individually placed. Onscreen, the atrium will appear

even bigger through the use of visual effects.

7

 

 

 

Escorted by Mr. Weasley, Harry enters the Ministry through the visitors’

entrance, which, for all intents and purposes, looks like an ordinary telephone box in the

heart of London. “We thought it would be amusing to put the Ministry of Magic

underneath the Muggle ministries, so we positioned the telephone box on the sidewalk

very close to the Ministry of Defense. So, unbeknownst to the Muggles, underneath the

British Ministry of Defense lies the Ministry of Magic,” Craig smiles.

Yates asserts, “One of the most fun elements of Harry Potter is how the wizarding

world exists right next to our own Muggle world. It is sometimes just next door or right

under our feet, if we only took the time to look. In fact, the two worlds often touch

without us realizing it.”

At Harry’s hearing, things don’t go as Fudge had planned, thanks to Dumbledore

and an unlikely eyewitness. Harry is cleared of all charges, but when he tries to talk to

Dumbledore after the hearing, his beloved mentor rushes away, refusing to even make

eye contact with the young wizard.

Reprising the role of Albus Dumbledore, Michael Gambon says, “Harry’s view of

Dumbledore is that he is Harry’s rock, but he sees his rock is collapsing a bit in this

movie. Dumbledore’s power is severely threatened, but that makes him more human,

doesn’t it? It also gave me another level of his character to explore, which was an

interesting experience.”

Still troubled by Dumbledore’s rebuff, Harry goes back to Hogwarts. But the test

that awaits him, as well as his classmates, will be unlike anything they have ever faced.

PINK IS THE NEW BLACK

Returning to Hogwarts, Harry is met with suspicious glances and the headline in

The Daily Prophet twists Harry’s surname from Potter to “Plotter,” accusing him outright

of lying about Lord Voldemort’s return. Feeling alone and ostracized, Harry even resists

the overtures of Ron and Hermione to help and support him, believing that no one can

understand what he is going through, including his closest friends.

Daniel Radcliffe acknowledges, “He is perhaps being a bit of a martyr, but I think

that is part of what’s so appealing about Harry—he is not perfect. He’s a flawed

character; that’s what makes him an incredibly human character. He is a really good

8

 

 

 

person, but one who is mired in self-doubt a great deal of the time, and I think most

people can relate to that.”

Yates says, “It’s an interesting time in Harry’s life because he feels vilified by

The Daily Prophet, which is the newspaper of the Ministry of Magic, and people are

starting to believe what they read. So when he comes back to Hogwarts, it doesn’t feel as

familiar and safe as it always has in the past. He feels like an outsider, and he has to

make a choice whether he is going to be defined by that or if he is going to hold onto the

friendships that have gotten him through so much during his school years. There are

moments where you see he could go either way, and that is the emotional center of the

story, for Harry in particular.

“It was also a really interesting journey for Dan as an actor because it was a

complex piece of acting work,” the director offers. “What’s great about Dan is he is

fearless and so determined. There were times we’d be doing take after take and I could

see the determination in his eyes to do it better on every take. I love that about him; he

just wants his performance to be the absolute best he can make it.”

The start of the new year at Hogwarts brings with it a new addition to the faculty:

Professor Dolores Umbridge, the new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher, played by

award-winning actress Imelda Staunton. Dressed in pink from head to toe, Professor

Umbridge has a practiced smile and a honeyed singsong voice that belies her true nature.

Yates explains, “Fudge is paranoid about Dumbledore, who he thinks is after his

job, so he places one of his most trusted lieutenants, Dolores Umbridge, at Hogwarts to

act as his eyes and ears. She decides it’s her mission to clear out all the deadwood and

conform Hogwarts to a very proper, orthodox way of teaching, staying within the box

that the Ministry thinks they should all fit into, which results in a brilliant collision of

values.”

“She’s definitely a wolf in sheep’s clothing,” Barron affirms. “She is nowhere

near as ‘pink’ as she appears. I don’t think Fudge realizes quite what he’s doing by

sending her there. I’m not sure even he knows what she is truly capable of.”

“She is all about control; order is paramount,” says David Heyman. “Anything

that veers from her almost fascistic view of the way things should be has no hope of

9

 

 

 

surviving in her world. She doesn’t believe that her students’ minds are vessels to be

inspired but rather to be filled with the thoughts and ideas of the Ministry.”

The students at Hogwarts are not the only targets in Dolores Umbridge’s sights.

The professors and staff are not any safer from her withering assaults. The Professor of

Divination, Sybill Trelawney, played by Emma Thompson, could not have foreseen that

Umbridge would dismiss her without a moment’s thought, while Charms Professor

Flitwick, played by Warwick Davis, also falls short of Umbridge’s standards. Even the

most respected professors, like Severus Snape, played by Alan Rickman, and Minerva

McGonagall, portrayed by Maggie Smith, hold no sway over the pink-clad High

Inquisitor. No one is safe from Umbridge’s relentless power grab. Not even Headmaster

Albus Dumbledore.

Heyman adds, “Her overriding aim is to discredit Dumbledore and seize control

of the school in the name of the Ministry. Nothing will stand in her way. And Imelda

plays that with a smile.”

Staunton states, “There are many people like that, who are outwardly charming

but there is a lot going on beneath the surface, which is a nice challenge to play. I don’t

believe for a moment Dolores thinks she’s doing anything wrong. She believes she is

doing what’s best and, of course, those are always the more frightening people because

they don’t see any other side. There is no compromise.”

“Imelda just ate up this character,” Yates declares. “She is an incredibly gifted

actress with wonderful comic timing. She was able to make Umbridge a woman of real

complexity and not a caricature in any sense.”

Based on the way the character is described in the book, Staunton might have

taken umbrage at being cast as Umbridge. “In the book, she is said to be very ugly and

toad-like, so when people would tell me, ‘You’d be great for the part,’ I’d say, ‘Well,

thanks very much,’” she laughs. “But it was great being asked to do this because the role

is a gem and it is heaven to be a part of this world…not to mention I have a much higher

status with my 12 year old at home now.”

Staunton also worked closely with costume designer Jany Temime to craft

Umbridge’s look. “We had a lot of fun creating this sort of little round person, who’s not

10

 

 

 

very nice,” the actress says. “I didn’t want her to have any hard edges. I thought it was

important for her to appear soft and warm because, of course, she is neither.”

To physically suggest Umbridge’s softness, Temime reveals, “We gave Imelda a

lot of padding because she’s actually a very thin woman.” The designer also used soft,

fuzzy fabrics for Umbridge’s costumes to add to the illusion of softness and warmth.

The color of the costumes, however, was predetermined by the book: pink, pinker

and pinkest. “Every time we see her, she is in a different shade of pink,” says Temime.

“As she gains power, the color gets stronger and more atrocious until she winds up in the

deepest shade of cerise.”

The color scheme was carried over to Umbridge’s office, which Stuart Craig and

his team decorated in shades of pink, and adorned with accents of lace and velvet and

cute little knickknacks all around. The furniture style is French, which the designer says

“is curvy, but has a sharpness to it,” a none-too-subtle hint to its owner’s real personality.

The most distinctive feature in the office is the display of some 200 kitten plates on the

walls, some of whose feline inhabitants are decidedly vocal and active.

By contrast, Umbridge’s classroom is much more austere, in keeping with her

style of teaching, which is severely limiting to her students, right down to the remedial

textbook she gives them. Rupert Grint observes, “Umbridge has a rather strange teaching

technique for a Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher. She believes progress should be

discouraged and we should study theory with no practical application, which is ridiculous

in a school of magic.”

Emma Watson agrees. “They are not really Defense Against the Dark Arts

lessons anymore because the students are not allowed to use magic. And for an eager

mind like Hermione’s, it’s like a slap in the face. She just can’t bear to sit there and be

treated like an idiot; it just makes her blood boil because learning is everything to her.

For the first time, Hogwarts, which has always been this very secure, stable place for

Harry, Ron and Hermione, is not safe. It’s scary and it’s dangerous.”

Dangerous because the students are not being prepared to fight or defend

themselves…especially in a world where the Dark Lord is again at large.

11

 

 

 

DUMBLEDORE’S ARMY

As Professor Umbridge wields her escalating power at Hogwarts, new and ever-

stricter Educational Decrees are posted, each one more limiting than the last. Almost

daily, new proclamations are hammered onto Hogwarts’ stone walls, banning anything

she deems to be subversive. But all her plotting backfires, as her stranglehold on the

school only serves to strengthen the students’ resolve to somehow defy her authority.

Yates notes, “What’s interesting is that, in trying to achieve complete control,

Umbridge ultimately achieves the exact opposite.”

It is Hermione who is the first to act, rallying her fellow students to take matters

into their own hands. Watson states, “They know that if they are not learning spells then

they will be unable to defend themselves. And while the Ministry is in denial that

Voldemort has returned, they are not. They believe Harry; they know there is something

dark and scary out there. I think that’s the reason that, for the first time in her life,

Hermione feels the need to rebel. It’s the first time she realizes that doing what you’re

told all the time doesn’t quite work. You can’t always trust authority; sometimes you

have to trust yourself.”

With Hermione and Ron’s encouragement, Harry agrees to step up and take on

the responsibility of teaching the Hogwarts students the spells they will need to know to

defend themselves against the Dark Arts. Radcliffe acknowledges, “At first Harry is

reluctant, but he is talked into it by Hermione, who, as usual, is irritating but happens to

be right on this occasion,” he laughs. “So we go underground and form Dumbledore’s

Army. Harry becomes their teacher, using the knowledge he has gained to train up the

students and teach them how to fight. The way he looks at it, there is a war coming, and

there is a sense of growing danger. If Umbridge isn’t teaching us what we need to do, we

won’t stand a chance when we are called upon to fight.”

David Heyman remarks that Harry going from classmate to teacher represents a

critical moment in the arc of the character. “We see Harry start out being a bit of an

outsider, feeling like people do not trust him, do not believe him, thinking he doesn’t

belong anymore. Then, ultimately, he finds out that he does belong. And not only does

he belong, but he has people who are willing to follow him. That’s a really powerful and

12

 

 

 

moving thing—watching Harry go from feeling isolated, even within his group, to

becoming a leader of that group. Moreover, he is a better teacher than some that he has

had.”

One member of the group is the ethereal Luna Lovegood, a soft-spoken girl with a

somewhat quirky personality, who is unfazed by what anyone else thinks of her. The

character is making her debut in “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” just as the

young actress playing her, Evanna Lynch, is making her acting debut in the coveted role.

Luna’s unique qualities made the part one of the most challenging to cast.

Casting director Fiona Weir and the filmmakers met dozens of contenders, but none were

quite what they had visualized for Luna, so they decided to hold an open call. More than

15,000 young hopefuls from all over the U.K. lined the blocks, standing for hours and

hours for their chance to audition. One of them was Evanna Lynch, an avid Harry Potter

fan who had fallen in love with the character of Luna when she read the book Harry

Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. “I loved her immediately,” Lynch states. “She is so

cool because she is so honest with everyone, including herself. She is funny and free and

kind of floats through life so everyone thinks she’s a bit dotty and silly, but she’s not.

She’s really clever and wise in her own way, and she has a good insight into things.”

Lynch felt an instant connection with Luna when she was introduced to the

character in the book, going so far as to put herself on tape reading Luna’s dialogue and

even sending the tapes in for consideration. Shortly after, she learned there would be an

open audition and declares, “I had to go…I was meant to go.” Persuading her father to

take her, she traveled from her home in Southern Ireland and joined the queue with

thousands of other candidates who shared her ambition but not her confidence. “I wasn’t

nervous because being Luna was natural to me,” she asserts.

The filmmakers agreed. David Barron recalls, “Fiona Weir met all 15,000 of the

girls and eventually distilled the choices down to 29, who she put on a DVD and sent to

us. She told us there was one girl to watch for, but didn’t tell us which one. I got as far

as the ninth one and rang Fiona and said, ‘It must be number nine,’ and it was. It was

Evanna. She was just fantastic.”

Heyman attests, “The difference between Evanna and all the other girls we

interviewed for the part is the others could play Luna; Evanna Lynch is Luna.”

13

 

 

 

Jany Temime adds that Lynch even contributed to her character’s costume. “She

was very specific about certain details. I made earrings for her that were red radishes,

and she insisted that they had to be orange. That’s how well she knew the character. We

wanted to make sure that Luna’s costumes reflected a girl with very individual tastes and

her own special interests, but not so completely different that she would not fit in with

others.”

Another member of Dumbledore’s Army, Neville Longbottom, played by

Matthew Lewis, has had his own troubles fitting in with his classmates, but he proves his

mettle when he uncovers the perfect spot for the group to train in complete secrecy: the

Room of Requirement. As its name suggests, it is a room that only appears to those who

need it, taking on whatever form is required but remaining invisible to anyone on the

outside.

Stuart Craig offers, “We gave the Room of Requirement a default or neutral state

in which the walls are mirrors and you cannot determine where the real space ends and

the reflection begins. I thought it was appropriate that reflected you and your need back

to yourself. But, being the Room of Requirement, if they needed books and cushions or

dummy Death Eaters to fight, they would appear, as in the novel.”

As a movie set, however, the mirrored room came with its own set of

requirements. Craig acknowledges, “Obviously, the mirrors made it enormously

challenging because they not only reflect the actors but the camera, the crew, the lights…

We were constantly changing the angles of the mirrors for each shot and, in some cases,

we used a dulling spray to kill a reflection.”

To minimize one concern, Craig and director of photography Slawomir Idziak

devised an ingenious under-floor lighting system with which they could light the set from

beneath grilles built onto the floor. For a time it looked like the system might not work

as planned as “it lit the soles of people’s shoes in a rather unfortunate way,” Craig relates.

“We ended up covering the soles of their shoes with black velvet and had everybody on

the crew or not in the shot wearing little blue surgical shoes to prevent them from

treading dust onto the floor of the set, which had to be black so as not to expose the

under-floor lighting.”

14

 

 

 

MISTLETOE

When Hogwarts adjourns for Christmas vacation, Harry’s underground class

reluctantly breaks for the holiday. But as the students part company, one stays behind:

the lovely Cho Chang, played by Katie Leung. Cho had first caught Harry’s eye in

“Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” and though they shared a tentative attraction, their

relationship has been made more complicated by their mutual connection to Cedric

Diggory, the young man who was Lord Voldemort’s first victim upon his return.

Knowing what was in their hearts, however, the Room of Requirement provided a sprig

of mistletoe, leading to an eagerly anticipated moment for Harry Potter fans

everywhere—Harry’s first kiss.

“I was slightly nervous because I knew Katie was nervous,” Radcliffe admits.

“It’s not just about the kiss; it’s about the complex relationship that Cho and Harry have.

But we did it a few times and after that it was not a big deal really. It was cool. We had

fun.”

“I was so nervous because it was my first onscreen kiss, but David Yates was

great. He told us exactly what he wanted, and that made it less intimidating,” says

Leung. “It was a bit awkward in the beginning, but Daniel made it easy for me, and it

went great. I really enjoyed it…and Daniel is a very good kisser,” she smiles.

Yates notes, “We wanted Dan and Katie to feel as comfortable as possible, so we

cleared the set and tried to keep the atmosphere as intimate as possible.”

The director’s preparations might have helped the two actors, but they did little to

assuage the nerves of many of the crew, who had virtually watched Daniel Radcliffe

grow up over the course of the Harry Potter films. Heyman states, “Many of us have

known Daniel since he was 10 years old, have seen him grow up before our eyes, care for

him so, and are protective of him. And here we were watching him have his first screen

kiss. It was so strange. I kept thinking, ‘I shouldn’t be watching this,’” he laughs. “But

it was perfect, and I think it will be a tender and beautiful moment for audiences.”

Heyman continues, “One of the great pleasures of working on the Harry Potter

films has been watching the kids grow up and seeing their talent blossom. They are all

15

 

 

 

great young people—curious, kind, sensitive, bright—and I think the performances you

will see in this film show how much they have developed as people and as actors.”

ALL CREATURES GREAT AND NOT-SO-SMALL

When classes reconvene, Umbridge is more determined than ever to track down

the rebellious students and put an end to their subversive activities. Long-suffering

caretaker Argus Filch isn’t having any luck, so she enlists the students of Slytherin

House, led by Harry’s nemesis Draco Malfoy, to spy for her. Tom Felton returns in the

role of the young Malfoy, who is all-too-eager to earn extra credit as one of Umbridge’s

Inquisitorial Squad, with the added bonus of one-upping Harry Potter. Meanwhile, as

Umbridge’s rise to power goes unchecked, she makes no secret of those she feels have no

place at Hogwarts.

Knowing it is only a matter of time before he, too, is banished from Hogwarts,

gamekeeper Rubeus Hagrid asks Harry, Ron and Hermione for a special favor. In his

absence, he will need them to look after his half-brother, Grawp, who just happens to be a

16-foot-tall giant.

Bringing Grawp to the screen involved a combination of design, motion capture,

visual effects and the talents of an actor named Tony Maudsley. Heyman says, “We

decided that Grawp should be a true innocent with a very short attention span. We

brought in Tony Maudsley, and he and David Yates spent a lot of time developing the

performance that would become Grawp through motion capture.”

Yates asserts, “Tony Maudsley really became the part and imbued every

movement with reason and rationale so, although the final character is more of a visual

effect, Tony gave him a heart and soul.”

Grawp’s heart can be seen when he is instantly taken with Hermione, who can’t

help but be flattered. “For Hermione, there is something sweet about Grawp,” notes

Emma Watson. “He is quite endearing in the way he has a soft spot for Hermione, and

she seems to be the only one who has any control over him, which is pretty funny.

know he is mostly made of special effects, but they somehow managed to make him feel

so real. He had such puppy dog eyes; I couldn’t help but fall in love with him.”

16

 

 

 

Creature & Make-Up Effects Designer Nick Dudman reveals that they did build a

full-size head for Grawp to “act” opposite the actors on the set, as well as to provide a 3D

model for the visual effects team to scan into the computer. “We needed to establish the

hair, the eyes, the teeth, all of which were controlled by us.”

“The scenes with Grawp were amazing,” Rupert Grint states. “They had this

massive head and shoulders on the set and you could almost forget he wasn’t all there.

They were some of my favorite scenes to do because when Grawp takes a fancy to

Hermione and picks her up, Ron gets jealous and tries to come to her rescue. He tries to

play the hero and beat up a giant and you can guess how that turned out,” he grins. “It

was fun because I got to do a little stunt work when he sent me flying.”

Hagrid hides Grawp deep in the Forbidden Forest, where the Centaurs also make

their home. The visual effects team, headed by Visual Effects Supervisor Tim Burke,

collaborated with Dudman and the design team on the creation of these noble creatures,

who were first introduced in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” Burke offers, “We

had Centaurs in the first film, but I think audiences will see that they have come a long

way since then. They aren’t a half-man/half-horse combination. They are beings unto

themselves.”

“The Centaurs are creatures of the forest, who are powerful and proud and very

protective of their land. They also represent everything that Professor Umbridge loathes

because she only sees them as half-breeds,” Heyman says.

A new addition to the world of Harry Potter, the skeletal winged creatures called

Thestrals also bear some equine traits, but they are decidedly not horses. Looking like a

curious combination of horse and dragon, the Thestrals can only be seen by those who

have witnessed death firsthand. Having witnessed Cedric’s death, Harry sees for the first

time that it is the Thestrals who are pulling the carriages that take them to Hogwarts.

Luna Lovegood, who as a child saw her mother die, can also see them and considers the

gentle creatures to be her friends.

Although the Thestrals would primarily be brought to life through visual effects,

Dudman and his team built a full-size maquette of the creature so the filmmakers could

visualize them in relationship to their surroundings. “It’s easy to say a Thestral has a 30foot

wingspan,” he explains, “but what does that mean? How will it fit in the set and how

17

 

 

 

will it relate to the actors? Also, because the Thestrals are black and seen at night, a lot

of discussion went into what their texture was and to determine exactly the right blackon-

black color scheme.”

Despite being invisible to all but Harry and Luna, the Thestrals prove to be

invaluable in carrying Dumbledore’s Army into their first battle—one that will try their

courage and test every spell in their newly acquired arsenal.

BATTLE LINES

Despite his newfound confidence as a leader and his open defiance of Umbridge

as a teacher, Harry is still plagued by nightmares. Even more terrifying, his nightmares

now seem to be foretelling actual events. But what troubles Dumbledore is the growing

realization that Harry’s nightmares might not be dreams at all but, rather, an attempt by

Voldemort to use Harry’s own mind against him. Dumbledore enlists Professor Snape to

teach Harry the art of Occlumency, which will enable him to block the Dark Lord’s

attempts to infiltrate his mind. The lessons are both grueling and revealing in ways

neither Harry nor even Snape had anticipated, but they are to no avail. Voldemort’s mind

games prove too strong for the young wizard.

Harry awakens from a terrible nightmare in which he sees Sirius being attacked

behind a door he remembers seeing when he was summoned to the Ministry for his

hearing. He knows there is a chance that the nightmare was actually a trap meant to lure

him to the Ministry, but he cannot take that chance. Sirius is the only family he has left.

But Harry will not be going alone. Despite his initial protestations, he is joined

by five courageous members of Dumbledore’s Army: Hermione, Ron, Neville, Luna and

the youngest Weasley sibling, Ginny. If Harry is willing to risk everything to save Sirius,

they are willing to risk everything to stand by him.

Arriving at the Department of Mysteries in the Ministry of Magic, the six young

wizards make their way into the Hall of Prophecy—a seemingly infinite room filled with

prophecies that have each been encased in a myriad of individual glass orbs and then

catalogued and stored on endless rows of shelves. Stuart Craig says the original plan was

“to physically manufacture 15,000 glass spheres and place them on glass shelves. The

whole thing was going to be a crystal palace covered in cobwebs and dust. But then we

18

 

 

 

realized that when the shelves came crashing down, it would be a one-take deal. It would

have taken weeks to replace and reset the orbs.” Practicality won out, and the entire

sequence was instead shot against a green screen, making the Hall of Prophecy the first-

ever completely computer-generated set in a Harry Potter film.

Harry instantly recognizes that he has seen the Hall of Prophecy before, but as

they makes their way down the rows of numbered shelves, it is Neville who makes a

startling discovery. The label for one of the glass orbs bears the name Harry Potter.

Unaware that the prophecy holds the key to the connection between him and Lord

Voldemort, Harry takes it in his hands…and the trap is sprung. The teenage wizards are

surrounded by a group of Death Eaters, led by the treacherous Lucius Malfoy. Reprising

the role of Lucius, actor Jason Isaacs notes, “At that moment, Lucius’ mask of civility is

gone forever. The battle lines have been drawn and there is no pretending which side he

is on.”

One of Lucius’ allies is Sirius’ sadistic cousin, Bellatrix Lestrange, a recent

escapee from Azkaban Prison and a devoted follower of the Dark Lord. It was she who

put a Cruciatus Curse on Neville’s parents, torturing them to insanity—a fate Sirius calls

“worse then death.” Her appearance gives Neville a new reason for being there.

Matthew Lewis, who has played the role of Neville in all of the Harry Potter movies,

comments, “Neville turns out to be a lot braver than even he thought. To take this

character on a journey from being this child who you would never think could fight, let

alone against Death Eaters, to being a man who will fight to avenge his parents…it was

just unbelievable.”

Joining the Harry Potter ensemble for the first time, Helena Bonham Carter

relished taking on the role of the evil Bellatrix Lestrange. “If somebody asks you to be in

a Harry Potter movie, you have to do it, and I really had fun with this role. Bellatrix

obviously has a personality disorder,” the actress laughs. “She actually gets a kick out of

being evil. I think she is in love with Lord Voldemort; she was willing to go to prison for

him for 14 years. Now that she’s out, she is even more fanatical.”

The six young wizards fight valiantly, using their wands to cast spells that most of

them have only just learned. But they are no match for the more experienced Death

Eaters. Just as the teenagers are on the brink of death, the Order of the Phoenix sweeps

19

 

 

 

in, with Sirius Black leading the charge and ordering Malfoy, “Get away from my

godson!”

The battle is on and despite the danger—or perhaps because of it—Sirius seems to

be enjoying the moment. Gary Oldman remarks, “Sirius has been so frustrated, first

being in prison for 12 years and, since then, hiding at Grimmauld Place. He has been

chomping at the bit to get his hands dirty and now he’s back. It’s like the old days.”

Screenwriter Michael Goldenberg says that scripting the pivotal battle between

the Order of the Phoenix and the Death Eaters was his most daunting challenge. “Trying

to capture the essence of what was in the book and shape it for the screen was a real

balancing act. We wanted to make sure there was a real sense of the danger—that

anything could happen and anyone could live or die. That’s what keeps people on the

edge of their seats.”

To stage the battle scenes, David Yates enlisted the help of choreographer Paul

Harris to infuse the wand-to-wand combat with a style reminiscent of fencing. “David

wanted me to set rules of engagement for fighting with the wands, which had not been

established in the previous films,” Harris explains. “He wanted a range of movements

and positions from which the spells could be delivered, but they had to be unique to the

world of Harry Potter.”

In addition to outlining a basic set of movements, Harris worked with the actors to

develop their individual techniques. He offers, “Jason Isaacs, for example, has a very

formal, pure style, whereas Gary Oldman’s style is a lot more ‘street,’ which befits the

character.”

As the battle escalates, there are triumphs and tragedies, all leading to a climactic

showdown between Albus Dumbledore and Lord Voldemort. Yates asserts, “The battle

between Voldemort and Dumbledore needed to be epic and visceral. I wanted audiences

to feel that they were inside the battle, experiencing it firsthand, so we tried to use a

hand-held camera whenever possible.”

In keeping with the fact that this was a fight between two powerful wizards,

visual effects supervisor Tim Burke adds, “David Yates came up with the inspired idea to

keep everything grounded in the elements—fire, water, sand... It’s all very logical and, at

the same time, astounding.”

20

 

 

 

The director remarks, “Ultimately, when you are watching this great battle

between Dumbledore and Voldemort, it is the climax of the first five stories thus far. We

had a duty to make it the most spectacular battle between good and evil, with Harry at its

center.”

“What they are ultimately fighting for is Harry’s soul,” David Heyman agrees.

“And in the midst of that, Harry, who had begun the story feeling completely isolated and

alone, even among his friends, finally sees that he has been given a priceless and

irreplaceable gift in the people in his life.”

Daniel Radcliffe offers, “What Harry realizes is that Voldemort may have the

followers and the power, but, ultimately, he will never have what Harry has, which is the

true and unconditional loyalty of his friends.”

Heyman adds, “And Harry has been given something by his mother and by his

friends that Voldemort will never have—the gift of love.”

Yates concludes, “‘Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix’ deals with some

complex and demanding themes, but I think the most striking is the power of friendship

and loyalty.”

# # #

21

 

 

 

ABOUT THE CAST

DANIEL RADCLIFFE is best known for playing the boy wizard Harry Potter in

all of the films based on J.K. Rowling’s best-selling books.

Earlier this year, Radcliffe took on his first major theatre role, playing Alan

Strang in Peter Shaffer’s award-winning play “Equus.” The play, which had not been

performed in London’s West End for more than 30 years, was directed by Thea Sharrock

and co-starred Tony Award-winning actor Richard Griffiths.

Radcliffe will next be seen in “December Boys,” an Australian independent

feature, directed by Rod Hardy, set for release in September 2007.

This summer, Radcliffe will shoot ITV’s drama “My Boy Jack,” written by and

starring David Haig. The film, which tells the story of Rudyard Kipling’s 17-year-old

son, Jack, who never returned from World War I, also stars Kim Cattrall and Carey

Mulligan and is being directed by Brian Kirk.

Last year, Radcliffe guest starred on an episode of the HBO series “Extras,”

starring Ricky Gervais.

RUPERT GRINT reprises his role as Harry Potter’s best friend, Ron Weasley,

the character he has played in all of the Harry Potter films.

“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” marked Grint’s professional acting debut.

His performance in that film brought him widespread praise, as well as a British Film

Critic’s Circle Award nomination for Best Newcomer and a Young Artist Award for

Most Promising Newcomer. In addition, the U.K.’s leading film magazine, Empire,

recently presented Grint and his Harry Potter co-stars Daniel Radcliffe and Emma

Watson with the prestigious Outstanding Contribution Award in recognition of their

performances in all of the Harry Potter films.

After appearing in the first Harry Potter film, Grint starred as a young madcap

professor in Peter Hewitt’s “Thunderpants,” alongside Simon Callow, Stephen Fry and

Paul Giamatti. Returning to the role of Ron Weasley, he starred in “Harry Potter and the

Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and

22

 

 

 

the Goblet of Fire.” In 2006, Grint appeared opposite Julie Walters and Laura Linney in

Jeremy Brock’s acclaimed independent feature “Driving Lessons.”

Prior to winning the role of Ron Weasley, Grint performed in school and local

theatre, including productions of “Annie,” “Peter Pan” and “Rumpelstiltskin.”

When not on a movie set, Grint is most likely to be found on the golf course.

EMMA WATSON returns in the role of Hermione Granger, the studious

longtime friend to both Harry Potter and Ron Weasley.

Watson’s appearance in the first film, “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,”

marked her professional acting debut and brought her a Young Artist Award for Best

Leading Young Actress. Her performances as Hermione have since won her a worldwide

following, as well as the AOL Award two years running for Best Supporting Actress, for

“Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of

Azkaban.” Watson has also gained two Critics’ Choice Award nominations from the

Broadcast Film Critics Association for her performances in “Harry Potter and the

Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” In addition, the readers

of Total Film magazine voted her Best New Performer for her work in “Harry Potter and

the Prisoner of Azkaban.” More recently, Watson was honored by the U.K.’s leading

film magazine, Empire, along with co-stars Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint, with the

prestigious Outstanding Contribution Award in recognition of their work in the Harry

Potter films.

Watson continues to balance filming with her studies and school activities and is

also a budding athlete. Her hobbies include travel, dance and singing.

HELENA BONHAM CARTER joins the cast of “Harry Potter and the Order of

the Phoenix” as Sirius Black’s cousin and Death Eater Bellatrix Lestrange.

Bonham Carter has starred in a wide range of film, television and stage projects

both in the United States and in her native England. Later this year, she will play Mrs.

Lovett in Tim Burton’s screen adaptation of the Stephen Sondheim musical “Sweeney

Todd,” starring opposite Johnny Depp in the title role. She previously co-starred with

Depp in the hit family film “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” also directed by Burton.

23

 

 

 

Bonham Carter was honored with Oscar, Golden Globe, BAFTA and Screen

Actors Guild Award nominations for her work in the 1997 romantic period drama “The

Wings of the Dove,” based on the novel by Henry James. Her performance in that film

also brought her Best Actress Awards from a number of critics organizations, including

the Los Angeles Film Critics, Broadcast Film Critics, National Board of Review and

London Film Critics Circle.

She made an auspicious feature film debut in the title role of Trevor Nunn’s

historical biopic “Lady Jane.” She had barely wrapped production on that film when

director James Ivory offered her the lead in “A Room With a View,” based on the book

by E.M. Forster. She went on to receive acclaim in two more screen adaptations of

Forster novels: Charles Sturridge’s “Where Angels Fear to Tread” and James Ivory’s

“Howard’s End,” for which she earned her first BAFTA Award nomination.

Bonham Carter’s early film work also includes Franco Zeffirelli’s “Hamlet,”

opposite Mel Gibson; “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” directed by and starring Kenneth

Branagh; Woody Allen’s “Mighty Aphrodite”; and “Twelfth Night,” which reunited her

with Trevor Nunn. She went on to star in David Fincher’s “Fight Club,” with Brad Pitt

and Edward Norton; and the drama “Big Fish” and the sci-fi actioner “Planet of the

Apes,” both for director Tim Burton. She has also starred in such independent features as

“Carnivale,” “Novocaine,” “The Heart of Me,” and “Till Human Voices Wake Us.”

In 2005, Bonham Carter lent her voice to two animated features: Tim Burton’s

“Corpse Bride,” in the title role; and the Oscar-winning “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse

of the Were-Rabbit.” Also that year, she starred in the live-action independent feature

“Conversations with Other Women,” opposite Aaron Eckhart.

For her television work, Bonham Carter earned Emmy and Golden Globe Award

nominations for her performances in the telefilm “Live From Baghdad” and the

miniseries “Merlin,” and a Golden Globe nomination for her portrayal of Marina Oswald

in the miniseries “Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald.” She also starred as Anne

Boleyn in the British miniseries “Henry VIII,” and as the mother of seven children,

including four autistic sons, in the BBC telefilm “Magnificent 7.”

Her stage credits include productions of “Woman in White,” “The Chalk

Garden,” “House of Bernarda Alba” and “Trelawny of the Wells,” to name only a few.

24

 

 

 

ROBBIE COLTRANE is back in the role of the Hogwarts caretaker and part-

time teacher Rubeus Hagrid.

One of the U.K.’s most prolific and respected film and television actors, Coltrane

earned BAFTA and Los Angeles Film Critics Circle Award nominations for his

performance as Hagrid in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” He reprised his role in

“Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”

and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Coltrane’s long list of film credits also includes “Alex Rider: Operation

Stormbreaker”; “Provoked: A True Story”; Steven Soderbergh’s “Ocean’s Twelve”;

“Van Helsing”; the Hughes brothers’ “From Hell,” with Johnny Depp; the James Bond

films “The World is Not Enough” and “Goldeneye”; Stephen Sommers’ “The Adventures

of Huckleberry Finn”; Luis Mandoki’s “Message in a Bottle”; “Buddy”; “The Pope Must

Die”; “Nuns on the Run,” for which he won The Peter Sellers Comedy Award at the 1991

Evening Standard British Film Awards; Kenneth Branagh’s “Henry V”; “Let It Ride”;

Carl Reiner’s “Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool”; Neil Jordan’s “Mona Lisa”; “Absolute

Beginners”; and “Defense of the Realm,” among others.

Coltrane is perhaps best known for his work in the award-winning and

internationally popular television series “Cracker,” which has also spawned several

television movies, the most recent airing in Fall 2006. His portrayal of the tough,

wisecracking police psychologist Dr. Eddie “Fitz” Fitzgerald has brought Coltrane

numerous acting honors, including three consecutive BAFTA Awards for Best Television

Actor in 1994, 1995 and 1996; the Broadcasting Press Guilds Award for Best Television

Actor in 1993; a Silver Nymph Award for Best Actor at the 1994 Monte Carlo Television

Festival; the Royal Television Society Award for Best Male Performer in 1994; FIPA’s

Best Actor Award; and a Cable ACE Award for Best Actor in a Movie or Miniseries.

Coltrane first gained popularity in the early 1980s for his comedy appearances on

such shows as “Alfresco,” “Kick Up the Eighties,” “Laugh??? I Nearly Paid My Licence

Fee” and “Saturday Night Live.” He went on to star in 13 “Comic Strip” productions and

numerous television shows, including “Blackadder the Third” and “Blackadder’s

Christmas Carol.” He received a BAFTA Award nomination for his portrayal of Danny

McGlone in the series “Tutti Frutti.” Coltrane’s more recent television credits include the

25

 

 

 

telefilms “The Ebb-Tide,” “Alice in Wonderland” and “The Planman,” which he also

executive produced. He also guest starred on the final episode of the series “Frasier.”

Coltrane was awarded the OBE in the 2006 New Year’s Honours List for his

Services to Drama.

WARWICK DAVIS returns as professor Filius Flitwick, having previously

played the character in all of the Harry Potter films.

Most recently, Davis appeared on television in an episode of the hit HBO series

“Extras,” written by and starring Ricky Gervais, which featured both Davis and Daniel

Radcliffe. His other credits include “The Chronicles of Narnia”; “Murder Rooms”; Steve

Cogan’s Hammer Horror homage, “Dr. Terrible’s House of Horrible”; “Carrie & Barry”;

“The Fitz”; “Gulliver’s Travels”; “The 10th Kingdom”; and “Snow White: The Fairest of

Them All.”

A seasoned theatre actor in the U.K., Davis has been featured in several

productions of “Snow White,” “Peter Pan” and “Aladdin.”

Davis is best known for his film appearances. His career began in the role of

Wicket in the “Star Wars” movie “Return of the Jedi,” which came about after his

grandmother heard a radio call for short actors. He was next seen in the film

“Labyrinth,” followed by the internationally successful adventure “Willow,” in title the

role that was written specifically for Davis.

In the recent acclaimed biopic “Ray,” Davis portrayed the character Oberon, the

MC in the jazz club that saw the first appearance of Ray Charles. His other film credits

include “Leprechaun” and its five sequels, “Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom

Menace,” “A Very Unlucky Leprechaun,” “The White Pony,” “The New Adventures of

Pinocchio” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.”

Davis is currently shooting “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian,” the

sequel to the hit “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.”

RALPH FIENNES once again portrays the evil Lord Voldemort, one of modern

literature’s most terrifying villains. He first played the role in 2005’s “Harry Potter and

the Goblet of Fire.”

26

 

 

 

In all, Fiennes starred in six films released in 2005, including Fernando Meirelles’

“The Constant Gardener,” for which he won a British Independent Film Award, an

Evening Standard British Film Award and a London Film Critics Circle Award, and

earned a BAFTA Award nomination. His other films released that year were James

Ivory’s “The White Countess,” “The Chumscrubber,” Martha Fiennes’ “Chromophobia”

and the Oscar-winning animated film “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-

Rabbit.”

A two-time Academy Award nominee, Fiennes earned his first nomination in

1994 for his performance in Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning Best Picture “Schindler’s

List.” His chilling portrayal of Nazi Commandant Amon Goeth also brought him a

Golden Globe nomination and a BAFTA Award, as well as Best Supporting Actor honors

from numerous critics groups, including the National Society of Film Critics, and the

New York, Chicago, Boston and London Film Critics. Fiennes received his second Oscar

nomination in 1997 for his work in another Best Picture winner, Anthony Minghella’s

“The English Patient.” He also garnered Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations,

as well as two Screen Actors Guild Award nominations, one for Best Actor and another

shared with the cast.

Fiennes most recently completed work on the upcoming film “In Bruges.” His

additional credits include “Red Dragon”; Neil Jordan’s “The End of the Affair” and “The

Good Thief”; David Cronenberg’s “Spider”; Martha Fiennes’ “Onegin,” which he also

executive produced; Istvan Szabo’s “Sunshine”; “Maid in Manhattan,” opposite Jennifer

Lopez; the animated musical “The Prince of Egypt”; “The Avengers”; “Oscar and

Lucinda”; “Strange Days”; Robert Redford’s “Quiz Show”; and “Emily Brontë’s

Wuthering Heights,” in which he made his film debut.

A graduate of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, Fiennes began his career on

the London stage. He joined Michael Rudman’s company at the Royal National Theatre

and later spent two seasons with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). In 1994,

Fiennes opened as Hamlet in Jonathan Kent’s production of the play. He later won a

Tony Award for his performance when the production moved to Broadway. He reunited

with Kent in the London production of “Ivanov,” later taking the play to Moscow. In

2000, Fiennes returned to the London stage in the title roles of “Richard II” and

27

 

 

 

“Coriolanus.” In 2002, he originated the role of Carl Jung in Christopher Hampton’s

“The Talking Cure” at the Royal National Theatre, and the following year played the title

role in Ibsen’s “Brand” at the RSC. In 2005, Fiennes played the title role in Deborah

Warner’s production of “Julius Caesar.” He most recently reteamed with director

Jonathan Kent to star in Brian Friels’ “Faith Healer,” which opened at the Gate Theatre in

Dublin before going to Broadway. Fiennes earned a Tony Award nomination for his

performance in the play.

MICHAEL GAMBON reprises his role as Albus Dumbledore, the wise and

respected headmaster of Hogwarts School. He also played Dumbledore in “Harry Potter

and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Gambon has been honored for his work on the stage, screen and television during

the course of his career, which has spanned more than four decades. He shared in Screen

Actors Guild and Critics Choice Awards as part of the ensemble cast of Robert Altman’s

“Gosford Park.” He has also won four BAFTA TV Awards for his performances in the

longform projects “Perfect Strangers”; “Longitude”; “Wives and Daughters,” for which

he also won a Royal Television Society (RTS) Award; and “The Singing Detective,” also

winning RTS and Broadcast Press Guild Awards for his work in the title role. Gambon

also received Emmy and Golden Globe Award nominations for his portrayal of President

Lyndon Baines Johnson in the HBO movie “The Path to War.” In 1998, he was knighted

by Queen Elizabeth II for services to theatre.

Gambon most recently appeared in Jake Paltrow’s “The Good Night,” which

premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, and Robert De Niro’s drama “The Good

Shepherd,” with Matt Damon and Angelina Jolie. His upcoming films include

“Brideshead Revisited” and “My Boy.”

A native of Ireland, Gambon began his career with the Edwards-MacLiammoir

Gate Theatre in Dublin. In 1963, he was one of the original members of the National

Theatre Company at the Old Vic under Laurence Olivier. He later joined Birmingham

Rep, where he played “Othello.” His extensive theatre repertoire also encompasses

numerous productions in London’s West End, including Simon Gray’s “Otherwise

Engaged”; the London premieres of three plays by Alan Ayckbourn, “The Norman

28

 

 

 

Conquests,” “Just Between Ourselves” and “Man of the Moment”; “Alice’s Boys”;

Harold Pinter's “Old Times”; the title role in “Uncle Vanya”; and “Veterans Day” with

Jack Lemmon, to name only a portion. In 1987, he won numerous awards, including an

Olivier Award for Best Actor for his performance in the London revival of Arthur

Miller’s “A View From the Bridge.”

With the Royal National Theatre (RNT), Gambon had major roles in the premieres

of Harold Pinter's “Betrayal” and “Mountain Language”; Simon Gray's “Close of Play”;

Christopher Hampton’s “Tales from Hollywood”; three more plays by Alan Ayckbourn,

“Sisterly Feelings” “A Chorus of Disapproval,” for which he won an Olivier Award, and

“A Small Family Business”; and David Hare’s “Skylight,” which moved on to the West

End and Broadway. Also with the RNT, Gambon did “Endgame,” with Lee Evans, and

played Falstaff in “Henry IV, Parts I and II.” His more recent stage work includes lead

roles in “Volpone,” for which he won an Evening Standard Award; Nicholas Hytner’s

production of “Cressida,” at the Almeida; Patrick Marber’s production of “Caretaker” in

the West End; and Stephen Daldry’s production of “A Number” at The Royal Court

Theatre.

On the screen, Gambon’s many film credits include the remake of “The Omen,”

Wes Anderson’s “The Life Aquatic,” “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow,”

“Sylvia,” “Open Range,” “The Insider,” Tim Burton’s “Sleepy Hollow,” “The Last

September,” “Dancing at Lughnasa,” “The Gambler,” “The Wings of the Dove” and

“The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover.” He also appeared in HBO’s award-

winning miniseries “Angels in America,” directed by Mike Nichols.

BRENDAN GLEESON returns as Alastor ‘Mad-Eye’ Moody, the role he first

played in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Gleeson has been seen in more than 40 films since he made his feature film debut

in Jim Sheridan’s “The Field.” He then had small roles in such films as Mike Newell’s

“Into the West” and Ron Howard’s “Far and Away” before landing the role of Hamish in

Mel Gibson’s Oscar-winning Best Picture “Braveheart.” He followed with the Neil

Jordan films “Michael Collins” and “The Butcher Boy,” and also starred in the

independent film “Angela Mooney,” executive produced by John Boorman.

29

 

 

 

In 1998, Boorman directed Gleeson in the role of real-life Irish folk hero Martin

Cahill in the acclaimed biopic “The General.” For his performance, Gleeson won several

acting honors, including the London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor. He has

since collaborated with John Boorman in the films “The Tailor of Panama,” “In My

Country” and “The Tiger’s Tail.”

Gleeson’s additional film credits include John Woo’s “Mission: Impossible II,”

“Harrison’s Flowers,” “Wild About Harry,” Steven Spielberg’s “Artificial Intelligence:

A.I.,” Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later…,” Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York,”

Anthony Minghella’s “Cold Mountain,” Wolfgang Petersen’s “Troy,” M. Night

Shyamalan’s “The Village,” Ridley Scott’s “Kingdom of Heaven,” Neil Jordan’s

“Breakfast on Pluto,” and “Black Irish.”

Gleeson is lending his voice to the animated film “Beowulf,” being directed by

Robert Zemeckis, which is due out in November 2007. His upcoming films also include

“In Bruges,” in which he is co-starring with Colin Farrell and Ralph Fiennes, under the

direction of Martin McDonagh. On the small screen, he will star in the title role of the

HBO movie “Churchill at War,” for director Thaddeus O’Sullivan.

Born in Ireland, Gleeson started out as a teacher but left the profession to pursue

an acting career, joining the Irish theatre company Passion Machine. His theatre credits

include productions of “King of the Castle,” “The Plough and the Stars,” “Prayers of

Sherkin,” “The Cherry Orchard,” and “Juno and the Paycock,” at the Gaiety Theatre,

which was also presented at the Chicago Theatre Festival. In 2001, he returned to the

stage at Dublin’s Peacock Theatre in Billy Roche’s play “On Such As We,” directed by

Wilson Milam.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS once again appears as Harry’s Muggle uncle, Vernon

Dursley, which he played in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” “Harry Potter and

the Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”

Griffiths most recently starred alongside Daniel Radcliffe in the West End revival

of Peter Shaffer’s award-winning play “Equus.” Last year, Griffiths earned a BAFTA

Award nomination for Best Actor for his performance as Hector in Nicholas Hytner’s

film adaptation of “The History Boys.” The actor had originated the role in London in

30

 

 

 

Hytner’s National Theatre production of the play, winning an Olivier Award for Best

Actor. Griffiths later reprised his role in the regional and international tours of the play,

as well as on Broadway, where he won the Tony Award for Best Leading Actor in a Play.

Griffiths’ other film credits include Roger Michell’s “Venus,” Richard Eyre’s

“Stage Beauty,” Roland Joffe’s “Vatel,” Tim Burton’s “Sleepy Hollow,” Peter Chelsom’s

“Funny Bones,” “Guarding Tess,” “Blame It on the Bellboy,” “The Naked Gun 2½,”

“King Ralph,” “Withnail & I,” “A Private Function,” Hugh Hudson’s “Greystoke: The

Legend of Tarzan,” Michael Apted’s “Gorky Park,” Richard Attenborough’s “Gandhi,”

Milos Forman’s “Ragtime,” Karel Reisz’s “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” and Hugh

Hudson’s Oscar-winning “Chariots of Fire.”

On television in the U.K., Griffiths is perhaps best known for his work on the

BBC television series “Pie in the Sky” and “Hope & Glory.” His other notable television

credits include roles in “Bleak House,” “The Brides in the Bath,” “Gormenghast,” “In the

Red,” “Ted & Ralph,” “Inspector Morse,” “Mr. Wakefield’s Crusade,” “Goldeneye: The

Secret Life of Ian Fleming,” “The Marksman,” “Casanova,” “The Cleopatras,” “Bird of

Prey” and the series “Nobody’s Perfect.”

An accomplished stage actor, Griffiths recently appeared in the West End

production of “Heroes.” He has also performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company in

“The White Guard,” “Once in a Lifetime,” “Henry VIII,” “Volpone,” and “Red Star.”

His major theatre credits also include productions of “Luther,” “Heartbreak House,”

“Galileo,” “Rules of the Game,” “Art,” “Katherine Howard” and “The Man Who Came

to Dinner.”

JASON ISAACS returns in the role of Death Eater Lucius Malfoy, which he first

played in the second Harry Potter film, “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” and

reprised in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” Isaacs more recently starred alongside

Catherine Keener, Jennifer Aniston, Joan Cusack and Frances McDormand in the

comedy “Friends with Money,” which premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival.

In Fall 2006, Isaacs starred in three prestigious projects, playing three very

diverse characters. In the BBC’s six-part conspiracy thriller “The State Within,” he

starred as Sir Mark Brydon, the besieged British Ambassador to Washington DC. In the

31

 

 

 

smash hit Showtime series “Brotherhood,” Isaacs played Irish-American gangster

Michael Caffee. In Channel 4’s telefilm “Scars,” written and directed by Leo Regan, he

starred as a damaged and dangerous Londoner named Chris. The film deals with the

causes and effects of violence via a virtual monologue, taken from interview transcripts.

The year prior, Isaacs appeared in equally varied roles, from the heartbreaking

romantic in Rodrigo Garcia’s award-winning “Nine Lives,” opposite Robin Wright Penn,

to the repressed suburban dad in “The Chumscrubber.” Both films premiered at the 2005

Sundance Film Festival. He also played the homophobic movie star in Donal Logue’s

independent comedy “Tennis Anyone?” and, on television, portrayed a cynical photojournalist

in a recurring role on NBC’s “The West Wing.”

Isaacs has been working non-stop since his portrayal of the cruel Colonel William

Tavington in 2000’s “The Patriot,” opposite Mel Gibson. His scene-stealing turn in that

film garnered him a London Film Critics’ Circle Award nomination for Best Supporting

Actor. The following year, Isaacs appeared in a sequined, strapless gown in the remake

of the romantic drama “Sweet November,” with Keanu Reeves and Charlize Theron, and

was then virtually unrecognizable as the bullet-headed Capt. Mike Steele in Ridley

Scott’s critically acclaimed war drama “Black Hawk Down.” Isaacs went on to star in

John Woo’s World War II drama “Windtalkers,” with Nicolas Cage; the bittersweet

romantic comedy “Passionada”; and the action comedy “The Tuxedo,” with Jackie Chan.

In 2003, Isaacs starred in the dual roles of Captain Hook and Mr. Darling in the live-

action feature “Peter Pan,” for director P.J. Hogan.

Isaacs has also made several movies with his friend, director Paul Anderson,

including the sci-fi thriller “Event Horizon,” “Soldier” and the British cult film

“Shopping.” Eagle-eyed viewers can also spot his uncredited cameos in Anderson’s

“Resident Evil,” Rob Bowman’s “Elektra,” Mike Figgis’ experimental film “Hotel” and,

most recently, “Grindhouse.” Isaacs’ other film credits include “The End of the Affair,”

the box office giant “Armageddon,” “Dragonheart,” “Divorcing Jack,” the musical “The

Last Minute” and “The Tall Guy,” which marked his feature film debut.

Born in Liverpool, England, Isaacs attended Bristol University where, while

studying law, he directed and/or starred in over twenty theater productions. After

graduating from London’s prestigious Central School of Speech and Drama, Isaacs

32

 

 

 

starred for two seasons on the hit British TV series “Capital City” and then appeared in

Lynda LaPlante’s controversial “Civvies” for the BBC.

On stage, he created the role of Louis in the critically acclaimed Royal National

Theatre production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Angels in America - Parts 1 & 2,” and

has performed to packed houses at the Royal Court Theatre, the Almeida Theatre, the

King’s Head and the Edinburgh Festival. He most recently returned to the stage to star

opposite Lee Evans in the West End revival of Harold Pinter’s “The Dumb Waiter,”

presented at Trafalgar Studios in a critically acclaimed limited run through February and

March of 2007.

GARY OLDMAN reprises the role of Harry’s godfather, Sirius Black, the

character he first portrayed in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and also

played in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Oldman is currently filming the new Batman film, “The Dark Knight,” in which

he reprises the role of Lieutenant James Gordon, the character he originated in the

blockbuster “Batman Begins.”

Oldman began his career in 1979 on the London stage. Between 1985 and 1989

he worked exclusively at London’s Royal Court Theatre and, in 1985, was named Best

Newcomer by London’s Time Out for his performance in “The Pope’s Wedding.” That

same year he shared the London Critic’s Circle Best Actor Award with Anthony

Hopkins.

In 1986, Oldman made his major feature film debut in “Sid and Nancy,” winning

the Evening Standard British Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer for his

portrayal of punk rock legend Sid Vicious. The following year, he starred in Stephen

Frears’ “Prick Up Your Ears,” winning the Best Actor Award from the London Film

Critics Circle for his portrayal of doomed British playwright Joe Orton.

Oldman has since become one of today’s most respected and versatile actors,

appearing in both mainstream hits and acclaimed independent films. His early film

credits also include Nicolas Roeg’s “Track 29”; “Criminal Law”; “Chattahoochee”; Tom

Stoppard’s “Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead,” for which he received an

Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Actor; “State of Grace”; “Henry & June”;

33

 

 

 

Oliver Stone’s “JFK,” playing Lee Harvey Oswald; and the title role in Francis Ford

Coppola’s “Dracula.”

Oldman’s subsequent film work includes memorable roles in Tony Scott’s “True

Romance”; “Romeo is Bleeding”; the Luc Besson films “The Professional” and “The

Fifth Element”; “Immortal Beloved”; “Murder in the First”; Roland Joffe’s “The Scarlett

Letter”; Julian Schnabel’s “Basquiat”; Wolfgang Petersen’s “Air Force One”; the big

screen version of “Lost in Space”; and Ridley Scott’s “Hannibal.”

In 1995 Oldman and manager/producing partner Douglas Urbanski formed the

production company The SE8 Group, which produced Oldman’s directorial debut feature

“Nil by Mouth,” which Oldman also wrote. The film was invited to open the 1997 50th

Cannes Film Festival in the main competition, where Kathy Burke won Best Actress for

her role. In addition, Oldman won two BAFTA Awards for Best British Film and Best

Screenplay; the Channel 4 Director’s Award at the 1997 Edinburgh International Film

Festival, and the Empire Award for Best Debut Film. He also executive produced and

starred in the SE8 Group film “The Contender,” which received two Oscar nominations

and brought Oldman a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination for Best Supporting

Actor.

On television, Oldman earned an Emmy nomination for his guest appearance as

an alcoholic actor on the hit comedy series “Friends.” His earlier television work

includes the telefilms “Meantime,” directed by Mike Leigh, and “The Firm,” directed by

Alan Clarke.

ALAN RICKMAN once again reprises his role as the enigmatic potions teacher

Severus Snape, the character he has played in all of the Harry Potter films.

He next stars as Judge Turpin in Tim Burton’s screen version of the Stephen

Sondheim musical “Sweeney Todd,” due out in December 2007.

Rickman was already an award-winning stage actor in his native England when he

made his feature film debut in the 1988 action blockbuster “Die Hard.” He has since

been repeatedly honored for his work in films and on television.

In 1992, he won a BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of

the Sheriff of Nottingham in “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.” Also that year, he

34

 

 

 

garnered both the Evening Standard British Film Award and the London Film Critics

Circle Award for Best Actor for his work in that film, as well as in Anthony Minghella’s

“Truly, Madly, Deeply” and Stephen Poliakoff’s “Close My Eyes,” with the London Film

Critics Circle adding his performance in “Quigley Down Under” for good measure. He

later earned BAFTA Award nominations for his performances in Ang Lee’s “Sense and

Sensibility” and Neil Jordan’s “Michael Collins.”

In 1997, Rickman won Emmy, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards

for his performance in the title role of the HBO movie “Rasputin.” He more recently

received an Emmy nomination for his starring role in the acclaimed HBO movie

“Something the Lord Made.”

Rickman’s additional film credits include “Nobel Son,” “Perfume: The Story of a

Murderer,” “Snow Cake,” “Love Actually,” “Blow Dry,” “Galaxy Quest,” “Dogma,”

“Judas Kiss” and “Mesmer,” for which he was named Best Actor at the 1994 Montreal

Film Festival.

In 1997, Rickman made his feature film directorial debut with “The Winter

Guest,” starring Emma Thompson, which he also scripted with Sharman Macdonald from

Macdonald’s original play. An official selection at the Venice Film Festival, the film was

nominated for a Golden Lion and won two other awards, and it was later named Best

Film when it screened at the Chicago Film Festival. Rickman also directed the play for

the stage at both the West Yorkshire Playhouse and the Almeida Theatre in London. In

addition, he directed the West End plays “Wax Acts” and “My Name is Rachel Corrie,”

the latter of which won Best New Play and Best Director at the Theatregoers’ Choice

Awards.

Rickman studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts before joining the Royal

Shakespeare Company (RSC) for two seasons. In 1985, he created the role of the

Vicomte de Valmont in “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” and, in 1987, he earned a Tony

Award nomination when he reprised the role on Broadway. Rickman more recently

starred in the acclaimed West End production of Noel Coward’s “Private Lives,” winning

a Variety Club Award and earning Olivier and Evening Standard Award nominations for

Best Actor. The play then moved to Broadway, where Rickman received his second

Tony Award nomination for Best Actor.

35

 

 

 

FIONA SHAW once again portrays Harry’s aunt, Petunia Dursley, who lives to

spoil her son, Dudley. She also played the role in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s

Stone,” “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of

Azkaban.”

Shaw was seen earlier this year in the acclaimed crime thriller “Fracture,” with

Anthony Hopkins and Ryan Gosling. Last year, she co-starred in the romantic comedy

“Catch and Release” and Brian De Palma’s “The Black Dahlia.” Her next film is the

comedy adventure “The Other Side.” Shaw’s additional film credits include “Close Your

Eyes,” “The Triumph of Love,” “The Last September,” “The Avengers,” “The Butcher

Boy,” “Anna Karenina,” “Jane Eyre,” “Persuasion,” “3 Men and a Little Lady,”

“Mountains of the Moon” and “My Left Foot.”

A celebrated stage actress, Shaw recently won the Evening Standard Award for

her performance in the London revival of “Medea.” When the production moved to New

York, Shaw won an Obie Award and earned a Tony Award nomination for her role. She

had previously been honored with an Olivier Award for the role of Rosalind in “As You

Like It”; Olivier and London Critics Circle Awards for her performances in “The Good

Person of Sichuan” and “Electra”; a London Critics Circle Award for the title role in

“Hedda Gabler”; Olivier and Evening Standard Drama Awards for Stephen Daldry’s

“Machinal”; and a New York Critics Award for her tour de force in T.S. Elliot’s “The

Waste Land.”

Shaw has also performed at the Royal National Theatre and with the Royal

Shakespeare Company, as well as on the stages of her native Ireland. In addition, she

embarked on a world tour in “The Waste Land.”

Shaw also reprised her roles in “The Waste Land,” “Hedda Gabler” and “Richard

II” for the BBC. Her television work also includes the recent ABC miniseries “Empire,”

as well as “The Seventh Stream,” “Mind Games,” “Gormenghast,” “RKO 281,”

“Seascape” and Danny Boyle’s “For the Greater Good.”

In 2000, Shaw was named an Officier des Arts et des Lettres in France, and the

following year received a CBE on the New Year’s Honours List.

36

 

 

 

MAGGIE SMITH reprises the role of Hogwarts professor Minerva McGonagall,

which she has played in all of the Harry Potter films.

One of the entertainment industry’s most esteemed actresses, Smith has been

honored numerous times for her work on the stage, screen and television. A two-time

Academy Award winner, Smith won her first Oscar for her unforgettable performance in

the title role of 1969’s “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” for which she also won a

BAFTA Award and earned a Golden Globe Award nomination. A decade later, she won

her second Oscar, as well as Golden Globe and Evening Standard Awards and a BAFTA

Award nomination, for her role in “California Suite.” More recently, Smith garnered

Oscar, Golden Globe and BAFTA Award nominations for her performance in Robert

Altman’s “Gosford Park,” also winning Screen Actors Guild and Critics’ Choice Awards

as part of the ensemble cast.

Smith’s myriad film acting honors also include Oscar nominations for “Othello,”

“Travels with My Aunt” and “A Room with a View,” for which she also won BAFTA

and Golden Globe Awards; and BAFTA Awards for “A Private Function” and “The

Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne,” also winning an Evening Standard Film Award for the

latter. She more recently won an Emmy Award for her performance in the HBO movie

“My House in Umbria.”

Smith started acting on the stage in 1952 with the Oxford University Drama

Society, and made her professional debut in New York in “The New Faces of 1956

Revue.” Three years later, she joined the Old Vic Company, where she won the 1962

Evening Standard’s Best Actress Award for her roles in “The Private Ear” and “The

Public Eye.” Joining the National Theatre in 1963, Smith played Desdemona to

Laurence Olivier’s “Othello.” Her other notable National Theatre productions include

“Black Comedy,” “Miss Julie,” “The Country Wife,” “The Beaux Stratagem,” “Much

Ado About Nothing” and “Hedda Gabler.”

But it was in 1969 that Smith was catapulted to screen stardom with her Oscar-

winning performance in “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.” Today’s film audiences know

Smith best for her work in the “Harry Potter” movies, as well as her roles in such films as

“Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood,” “The First Wives Club,” “Sister Act,” “The

Secret Garden” and Steven Spielberg’s “Hook.” Her additional film credits include

37

 

 

 

“Becoming Jane,” “Ladies in Lavender,” “The Last September,” “Washington Square,”

“Richard III,” “The Missionary,” “Death on the Nile,” “Murder by Death” and “The

Honey Pot.”

Throughout her career Smith has continued to appear on the stages of London and

New York. She won a Tony Award for her performance in “Lettice and Lovage,” and

had earlier received Tony Award nominations for “Night and Day” and “Private Lives.”

She has also won Evening Standard Drama Awards for her performances in “Virginia”

and “Three Tall Women.”

On television, Smith has earned Emmy nominations for her roles in the telefilms

“Suddenly, Last Summer” and “David Copperfield,” for which she also received a

BAFTA TV Award nomination. Additionally, she earned BAFTA TV Award

nominations for the television movies “Memento Mori” and “Mrs. Silly,” as well as the

miniseries “Talking Heads,” winning a Royal Television Society Award for the last.

She became a Dame in 1990 when she received the DBE, is a Fellow of the

British Film Institute and was awarded a Silver BAFTA Lifetime Achievement Award in

1993.

IMELDA STAUNTON joins the cast as Hogwarts’ new Defense Against the

Dark Arts teacher, the ruthlessly ambitious Dolores Umbridge.

In 2004, Staunton portrayed the title role in Mike Leigh’s drama “Vera Drake,”

delivering a searing performance that was heralded by both critics and audiences. For her

work in the film, Staunton earned numerous Best Actress honors, including Academy

Award, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award nominations. She also

won a BAFTA Award, an Evening Standard British Film Award, a British Independent

Film Award, a European Film Award and the 2004 Venice Film Festival Award for Best

Actress. In addition, Staunton was named the Best Actress of the year by many top

critics groups, including the New York Critics Circle, Los Angeles Film Critics, London

Critics Circle, Toronto Film Critics, Chicago Film Critics and National Society of Film

Critics, among others.

Staunton more recently starred in Richard LaGravenese’s true-life drama

“Freedom Writers,” with Hilary Swank, and Kirk Jones’ fantasy comedy “Nanny

38

 

 

 

McPhee,” with Emma Thompson. Her additional film credits include Stephen Fry’s

“Bright Young Things”; John McKay’s “Crush,” with Andie MacDowell; John Madden’s

Oscar-winning “Shakespeare in Love,” for which she shared in a SAG Award for

Outstanding Cast Performance; Trevor Nunn’s “Twelfth Night”; Ang Lee’s “Sense and

Sensibility”; the Kenneth Branagh films “Peter’s Friends” and “Much Ado About

Nothing”; and Beeban Kidron’s “Antonia & Jane.” She has also lent her voice to several

animated features, most notably the clay animation hit “Chicken Run.”

Honored for her work on the London stage, Staunton has won three Olivier

Awards for her performances in “A Chorus of Disapproval,” “The Corn is Green” and

“Into the Woods.” Additionally, she has earned three Olivier nominations for her roles in

“Uncle Vanya,” “The Wizard of Oz” and “Guys and Dolls.” Her extensive theatre

repertoire also includes productions of “There Came a Gypsy Riding,” “Calico,” “The

Beggar’s Opera,” “The Fair Maid of the West,” “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?,”

“Habeas Corpus,” “Travesties,” “Electra,” “A Little Night Music,” “Mack and Mabel”

and “She Stoops to Conquer.”

Staunton is also well-known to British television audiences for her roles in such

longform projects as “Cranford Chronicles,” “The Wind in the Willows,” “My Family

and Other Animals,” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “Fingersmith,” “Cambridge

Spies,” “David Copperfield,” “Citizen X” and “The Singing Detective.” She has also had

recurring roles on several series, most recently including “Little Britain.”

In 2006, Staunton received an OBE on the New Year’s honours list.

DAVID THEWLIS rejoins the cast as former Defense Against the Dark Arts

teacher Remus Lupin.

Thewlis gained international acclaim when he starred in Mike Leigh’s drama

“Naked.” For his powerful performance in the film’s central role, he was named Best

Actor at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival, and also won Best Actor honors from the

London and New York Film Critics and the Evening Standard Film Awards. He had

previously worked with Leigh on the film “Life is Sweet” and the television project “The

Short and Curlies.”

39

 

 

 

He has appeared in more than 30 films over the past 20 years, also including

Beeban Kidron’s “Vroom,” Paul Greengrass’ “Resurrected,” Louis Malle’s “Damage,”

David Jones’ “The Trial,” Caroline Thompson’s “Black Beauty,” Agnieszka Holland’s

“Total Eclipse,” Mike Hoffman’s “Restoration,” Rob Cohen’s “Dragonheart,” John

Frankenheimer’s “The Island of Dr. Moreau,” Jean-Jacques Annaud’s “Seven Years in

Tibet,” the Coen brothers’ “The Big Lebowski,” Bernardo Bertolucci’s “Besieged,” Peter

Hewitt’s “Whatever Happened to Harold Smith?,” Richard Donner’s “Timeline,” Ridley

Scott’s “Kingdom of Heaven,” Jordan Scott’s segment of “All the Invisible Children,”

Terrence Malik’s “The New World,” Michael Caton-Jones’ “Basic Instinct 2: Risk

Addiction” and John Moore’s recent remake of “The Omen.”

He recently completed work on the indie feature “The Inner Life of Martin Frost,”

in which he plays the title role, and is currently filming “The Boy in the Striped

Pyjamas,” being directed by Mark Herman and produced by David Heyman.

In addition to his acting, Thewlis made his directorial and writing debut on the

short “Hello, Hello, Hello,” which earned a BAFTA Award nomination for Best Short

Film. He recently wrote, directed and starred in the 2003 independent film “Cheeky.”

On television, Thewlis has been seen in such longform projects as “Dinotopia,”

“Endgame,” “Dandelion Dead,” the award-winning “Prime Suspect 3,” “Black and

Blue,” “Journey to Knock,” “Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit,” “Skulduggery” and “The

Singing Detective.” He also had a recurring role on the series “A Bit of Do.”

In addition to his film and television work, Thewlis has starred in a number of

plays, including “The Sea,” directed by Sam Mendes at the Royal National Theatre; “Ice

Cream” at the Royal Court; “Buddy Holly” at the Regal in Greenwich; “Ruffian on the

Stairs/The Woolley” at Farnham; and “The Lady and the Clarinet” at the Kings Head.

EMMA THOMPSON returns to the Harry Potter films as Sybill Trelawney, the

character she first played in “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”

Thompson most recently starred in the widely praised comedy drama “Stranger

than Fiction.” She was virtually unrecognizable in the title role of the hit family film

“Nanny McPhee,” for which she also wrote the screenplay. She is currently working on a

sequel to “Nanny McPhee.” Additionally, Thompson is presently filming “Brideshead

40

 

 

 

Revisited,” in which she stars with Michael Gambon, and she then stars in the romantic

drama “Last Chance Harvey,” opposite Dustin Hoffman.

Thompson is one of today’s most honored talents for her work as both an actress

and a screenwriter. In 1993, she swept the Academy Award, Golden Globe Award,

BAFTA Award and Evening Standard Film Award, in addition to Best Actress Awards

from the New York and Los Angeles Film Critics, the National Society of Film Critics

and National Board of Review, for her role in the Merchant Ivory drama “Howards End.”

The following year, Thompson earned dual Oscar and Golden Globe nominations: for

Best Actress in James Ivory’s “The Remains of the Day,” for which she also received a

BAFTA Award nomination; and for Best Supporting Actress in Jim Sheridan’s “In the

Name of the Father.” She also won an Evening Standard Film Award for her work in

both “The Remains of the Day” and Kenneth Branagh’s “Much Ado About Nothing”

In 1996, Thompson again received dual Academy Award nominations, receiving

a nod for her role in Ang Lee’s “Sense and Sensibility” and winning the Oscar for her

screenplay, adapted from the book by Jane Austen. The honor made her the only person

ever to win Academy Awards in both acting and screenwriting categories. Additionally,

she won Best Adapted Screenplay Awards from the Writers Guilds of America and Great

Britain, as well as the New York, Los Angeles, Boston, London and Broadcast Film

Critics. She also took home Golden Globe and Evening Standard Film Awards and

earned a BAFTA Award nomination. For her role in the film she won BAFTA and

National Board of Review Awards, and earned Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild

Award nominations.

Her more recent film honors include an Evening Standard Film Award, an Empire

Award and the London Film Critics Circle Award for Richard Curtis’ “Love Actually,”

for which she also gained another BAFTA Award nomination. On the small screen,

Thompson earned Emmy and SAG Award nominations for her multiple roles in the 2003

HBO miniseries “Angels in America,” directed by Mike Nichols. She and Nichols had

previously collaborated on the HBO movie “Wit,” in which she starred under his

direction. In addition, they co-wrote the screenplay, based on the play by Margaret

Edson, for which they won a Humanitis Prize and shared an Emmy nomination.

Thompson also received Emmy, Golden Globe and SAG Award nominations for her

41

 

 

 

performance in the drama. She had earlier won an Emmy Award for her hilarious guest

turn on the sitcom “Ellen.”

Thompson was literally born into show business, with her father, Eric Thompson,

a theatre director and writer, and her mother, Phyllida Law, an actress. Studying English

at Cambridge, she was invited to join the school’s Footlights comedy troupe. She also

co-directed Cambridge’s first all-women revue, “Women’s Hour.” While still a student,

she made her television debut on the BBC’s “Friday Night, Saturday Morning.”

Throughout the 1980s Thompson appeared frequently on British television,

including the telefilm “The Crystal Cube” and a recurring role on the series “Alfresco,”

both with Hugh Laurie. In 1985, Channel 4 offered Thompson her own TV special, “Up

for Grabs,” and, in 1988, she wrote and performed in her own BBC series called

“Thompson.”

Remaining active in the theatre, Thompson appeared in “A Sense of Nonsense,”

in a tour of England; the self-penned “Short Vehicle” at the 1983 Edinburgh Festival;

“Me and My Girl,” first at Leicester and then in London’s West End in 1985; and “Look

Back in Anger” at the Lyric Theatre in 1989.

In 1989, she made her feature film debut in the comedy “The Tall Guy” and

played Katherine in Kenneth Branagh’s film directing debut, “Henry V.” Her additional

film credits include Branagh’s “Dead Again” and “Peter’s Friends”; Ivan Reitman’s

“Junior”; Christopher Hampton’s “Carrington”; Alan Rickman’s “The Winter Guest”;

and Mike Nichols’ “Primary Colors.”

JULIE WALTERS reprises her role as the maternal Mrs. Weasley, the role she

has played in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” “Harry Potter and the Chamber of

Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”

Walters can also be seen this fall in the independent film “Becoming Jane.” She

next co-stars with Meryl Streep in the film version of the musical “Mama Mia!”

A two-time Academy Award nominee, Walters gained her first nomination in

1984 for her feature film debut in the title role of “Educating Rita,” for which she also

won BAFTA and Golden Globe Awards. She earned her second Oscar nod for her

performance in Stephen Daldry’s “Billy Elliot.” Her portrayal of Billy’s ballet teacher in

42

 

 

 

that film also brought her BAFTA, Empire, Evening Standard Film and London Film

Critics Circle Awards, in addition to Golden Globe and European Film Award

nominations and two Screen Actors Guild Award nominations, one for Supporting

Actress and a second, shared with her castmates, for Outstanding Cast Performance.

Walters has also earned BAFTA Award nominations for her roles in “Personal Services”

and “Stepping Out,” winning a Variety Club Award for the latter.

Walters includes among her other film credits “Driving Lessons,” with her Harry

Potter son Rupert Grint, “Wah-Wah,” “Calendar Girls,” “Before You Go,” Roger

Michell’s “Titanic Town,” “Girls’ Night,” “Intimate Relations,” “Sister My Sister,” “Just

Like a Woman,” “Buster” and Stephen Frears’ “Prick Up Your Ears.”

Walters has also worked extensively on television in the U.K. and recently won

three consecutive BAFTA TV Awards in 2002, 2003 and 2004 for her roles in “Strange

Relations”; “Murder,” for which she also won a Royal Television Society Award; and the

series “The Canterbury Tales,” for which she also won a Broadcasting Press Guild

Award. She previously earned four BAFTA TV Award nominations, in 1983 for the

miniseries “Boys From the Blackstuff”; in 1987 for the series “Victoria Wood: As Seen

on TV”; in 1994 for the telefilm “The Wedding Gift”; and in 1999 for the series

“Dinnerladies.” Her television credits also include “The Ruby in the Smoke,” “Ahead of

the Class,” “The Return,” “Oliver Twist,” “Jake’s Progress,” “Pat and Margaret,” “The

Summer House,” “Julie Walters and Friends,” “Talking Heads” and “The Birthday

Party,” to name only a portion.

An accomplished stage actress, Walters won an Olivier Award in 2001 for her

performance in Arthur Miller’s “All My Sons,” and was earlier nominated for an Olivier

for her work in Sam Shepard’s “Fool for Love.” She had made her London stage debut

in “Educating Rita,” creating the role that she would later bring to the screen. Her theatre

credits also include productions of such plays as “Jumpers,” “Having a Ball,” “Frankie

and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,” “When I was a Girl I Used to Scream and Shout,”

Tennessee Williams’ “The Rose Tattoo” and the musical “Acorn Antiques.”

In addition to her acting work, Walters’ first novel, Maggie’s Tree, was published

in 2006.

43

 

 

 

ROBERT HARDY reprises his role as Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic,

whom he has also portrayed in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter

and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Hardy has been one of the U.K.’s most respected character actors, with a career

spanning six decades and encompassing a wide range of film, television and stage roles.

He most recently co-starred in the family film “Lassie,” and also includes among his

many film credits “The Gathering,” David Yates’ “The Tichborne Claimant,” “An Ideal

Husband,” “Mrs. Dalloway,” Ang Lee’s “Sense and Sensibility,” Kenneth Branagh’s

“Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein,” David Hare’s “Paris by Night,” “The Shooting Party,”

“Yellow Dog,” Richard Attenborough’s “Young Winston,” Martin Ritt’s classic thriller

“The Spy Who Came in from the Cold,” and several French films.

Hardy is perhaps best known for his television work, including his seven seasons

on the series “All Creatures Great and Small,” for which he earned a BAFTA TV Award

nomination. He also received a BAFTA TV Award nomination and won a Broadcasting

Press Guild Award for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in the miniseries “Winston

Churchill: The Wilderness Years.” In 1988, he played Churchill twice, in the miniseries

“War and Remembrance” and the telefilm “The Woman He Loved.” He most recently

returned to the role of Churchill in the 2006 telefilm “Marple: The Sittaford Mystery.”

His more than 80 television credits go on to include “Death in Holy Orders,” “Lucky

Jim,” “The Falklands Play,” “Bertie and Elizabeth,” “Shackleton,” “The Lost World,”

“The 10th Kingdom,” “Gulliver’s Travels,” “Jenny’s War,” “The Far Pavillions,”

“Edward the King,” “The Gathering Storm,” “Elizabeth R,” and the series “Hot Metal”

and “Mogul.”

Hardy began his acting career on the stage in 1949 with the Shakespeare

Memorial Theatre at Stratford-upon-Avon. His distinguished stage career includes

productions of such plays as “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The River Line,” “Camino

Real,” “The Rehearsal,” “A Severed Head,” “The Constant Couple,” “Habeas Corpus,”

“Dear Liar,” “Body and Soul,” and the role of Winston Churchill in the French

production of “The Man Who Said No” at the Palais des Congres in Paris.

Hardy also wrote and co-directed the TV film “The Picardy Affair,” the radio play

“The Leopard and the Lilies,” and two documentaries for BBC’s “Chronicle.” In

44

 

 

 

addition, he has published two books on medieval warfare entitled Longbow and The

Great War-Bow.

DAVID BRADLEY returns in the role of Hogwarts’ caretaker, Argus Filch, the

character he has played in all of the Harry Potter films.

One of the U.K.’s most distinguished stage actors, Bradley is a longstanding

member of both the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and the National Theatre. In

1991, he won an Olivier Award for his performance as the Fool in “King Lear” at the

National Theatre. In 1993, he won the Clarence Derwent Award for the roles of Polonius

in “Hamlet” and Shallow in “Henry IV, Part II” at the RSC, also earning an Olivier

Award nomination for the latter. He most recently received an Olivier Award nomination

in 2006 for the title role in “Henry IV, Parts I and II,” at the National Theatre.

His numerous credits with the RSC also include “Titus Andronicus,” “The

Tempest,” “Julius Caesar,” “The Alchemist,” “Dr. Faustus,” “Cymbeline,” “Three

Sisters,” “Twelfth Night,” “Tartuffe,” and “The Merchant of Venice,” to name only a

few. His appearances at the National are equally extensive, with a partial list including

“The Night Season,” “The Mysteries,” “The Homecoming,” “Mother Courage,” “Richard

III,” “Measure for Measure,” “The Cherry Orchard,” “`Tis Pity She’s a Whore” and “The

Front Page.” West End audiences have also seen Bradley in such plays as “Uncle

Vanya,” “Britannicus,” “Phedre” and “Funny Peculiar.”

On the big screen, Bradley includes among his film credits “Hot Fuzz,” “Red

Mercury,” “Exorcist: The Beginning,” “Nicholas Nickleby,” “The Intended,” “This is

Not a Love Song,” “Gabriel & Me,” “Blow Dry,” “The King is Alive,” “Tom’s Midnight

Garden” and “Left Luggage.”

A familiar face to British television audiences, Bradley previously worked with

David Yates in the miniseries “The Way We Live Now.” He has also been seen in such

longform productions as “Sweeney Todd,” “Mr. Harvey Lights a Candle,” “Blue Dove,”

“The Last King,” “”The Mayor of Casterbridge,” “Murphy’s Law,” “Sweet Dreams,”

“Vanity Fair,” “Our Mutual Friend,” “Reckless,” “Our Friends in the North” and “Martin

Chuzzlewit.” He has also guest starred on numerous series and had a recurring role on

the series “A Family at War.”

45

 

 

 

MARK WILLIAMS returns as Arthur Weasley, the Weasley family patriarch,

the role he previously played in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,” “Harry Potter

and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Since graduating from Oxford University, Williams has become familiar in the

U.K. for his work in films, television and theatre. His film credits include Michael

Winterbottom’s “Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story,” Metin Huseyin’s “Anita and

Me,” Peter Hewitt’s “The Borrowers,” Stephen Herek’s “101 Dalmatians,” Karen Adler’s

“Fever,” Gabriel Axel’s “Prince of Jutland,” Clare Peploe’s “High Season, the British

Film Institute’s “Out of Order” and Michael Hoffman’s “Privileged.”

Williams is perhaps best known in the U.K. as a regular on the BBC TV series

“The Fast Show,” on which he appeared for four seasons as well as a Christmas special.

His most recent television work includes the series “Carrie & Barrie” and the telefilms

“The Rotters’ Club” and “Viva Blackpool.” He next stars in the miniseries adaptation of

Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility.” He has also been seen in such projects as “Red

Dwarf,” “Stuff,” “Bottom,” “Harry Enfield,” “Tumbledown,” “Making Out,” “Kinsey,”

“Bad Company,” “Hunting Venus” and “Happy Birthday Shakespeare.” He was also a

team host on the quiz show “Jumpers for Goalposts.”

In 2002, Williams presented a 10-part series for the Discovery Channel, entitled

“Industrial Revelations with Mark Williams,” followed by 2004’s “On the Rails with

Mark Williams” and 2005’s “More Industrial Revelations with Mark Williams.” His

most recent documentary was “Mark Williams’ Big Bangs,” a four-part series for Sky

One. In addition, Williams has directed for the Channel 4 sitcom “Festival” and coproduced

the Channel 4 sitcom “In Exile.”

On stage, Williams spent three years touring by narrowboat with the Mikron

Theatre Company. His credits also include the title role in “William” for the Royal Court

Theatre’s Young Writers Festival; “Fanshen” at the National Theatre; “Doctor of

Honour,” for the Cheek by Jowl Theatre Company; “The City Wives Confederacy” at

Greenwich Theatre; “Moscow Gold,” “Singer,” “A Dream of People” and “As You Like

It,” for the Royal Shakespeare Company; “Art” in the West End; and “Toast” at the

46

 

 

 

Royal Court Theatre. In 1988, he enjoyed a sold-out run in “The Fast Show Live on

Stage.” In 2002, “The Fast Show Live on Tour” played to great success across the U.K.

TOM FELTON returns as Harry Potter’s arch-enemy and Slytherin schoolboy

Draco Malfoy, a role he has made his own in all five of the “Harry Potter” films.

Felton was first seen on the big screen in 1996, when he played the role of

Peagreen Clock in Peter Hewitt’s fantasy “The Borrowers.” In 1999, he portrayed Jodie

Foster’s screen son, Louis, in “Anna & the King.”

On television, Felton has appeared in a number of series in the U.K., including

“Bugs,” in which he played James, and “Second Sight,” opposite Clive Owen. He has

also starred in two BBC Radio 4 plays, “The Wizard of Earthsea” and “Here’s to

Everyone.”

Felton has been acting professionally since he was eight years old. He first came

to attention in 1995 when he was featured in a number of top television commercials.

When he is not acting, he is an avid carp fisherman.

MATTHEW LEWIS plays Harry Potter’s faithful friend Neville Longbottom,

the character he has portrayed in all of the Harry Potter films.

Lewis began acting when he was just five years old after joining a performing arts

club. He won the role of Neville when an open casting call was held in his hometown of

Leeds. In addition to the Harry Potter films, Lewis has been featured in a number of

television series in the U.K., including “Heart Beat,” “City Central,” “Where the Heart

Is,” “Sharpe,” “Dalziel and Pascoe” and “Some Kind Of Life.”

When Lewis is not busy in front of the camera, he enjoys reading and writing

short stories, and has developed an interest in filmmaking.

EVANNA LYNCH makes her acting debut in the role of Luna Lovegood, the

free-spirited new friend to Harry Potter.

Lynch’s story is the kind of which fairytales are made. A dedicated Harry Potter

fan, Lynch felt an immediate affinity with the character of Luna upon first reading Harry

Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. She even took the bold step of sending an audition

47

 

 

 

tape to the production in hopes of being able to read for the character. She then learned

of an open casting call for the role, scheduled for January 2006 in London. Flying with

her father from her Dublin-area home, she patiently lined up with 15,000 other young

hopefuls, all vying for the part of Luna. Lynch, however, stood out for both the casting

director and filmmakers and landed the coveted role.

At home in County Louth, Ireland, Lynch enjoys spending time with the family

pets (which include a cat called Luna and a kitten named Dumbledore). She has never

had any formal acting training but has been active in a local drama club, and also enjoys

modern dance, ballet and contemporary dance. Her many hobbies include jewelry

design, and she often makes rings and earrings for herself and friends.

KATIE LEUNG is appearing in her second Harry Potter film in the role of Cho

Chang, a Ravenclaw student at Hogwarts and the object of Harry Potter’s affections.

Prior to playing Cho in “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” Leung had had no

prior acting experience. By chance, her father saw the open casting call advertisement on

a Chinese television channel. Leung auditioned and, out of more than 5,000 contenders,

won the much-coveted role of Harry Potter’s love interest.

Leung is an avid music fan and listens to all genres, including jazz, R&B, pop,

indie rock and hip-hop. She also plays the piano.

HARRY MELLING rejoins the cast as Harry’s spoiled Muggle cousin, Dudley

Dursley. He made his acting debut playing Dudley in “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s

Stone,” and reprised the role in “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry

Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”

In addition, Melling is a member of the National Youth Theatre and has had roles

in their productions of “The Master and Margarita,” “The Merchant of Venice” and

“Watch Over Me Three.” He also portrayed Young Oliver in Stephen Poliakoff’s

“Friends and Crocodiles” for the BBC.

Melling is in school studying drama, English and art. He has recently written a

short play, which he is trying to get produced on the London Fringe.

48

 

 

 

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

DAVID YATES (Director) is an award-winning director, who has been primarily

best known for his television work.

Yates won his first BAFTA TV Award for his work on the BBC miniseries “The

Way We Live Now,” a period drama starring Matthew Macfadyen and Miranda Otto. In

2003, he directed the drama series “State of Play,” for which he received a BAFTA TV

Award nomination and won the Directors Guild of Great Britain (DGGB) Award for

Outstanding Directorial Achievement. The project also won the Broadcasting Press

Guild Award, the Royal Television Society (RTS) Award, and Banff Television

Festival’s Rockie Award for Best Series.

The following year, Yates directed the gritty two-part drama “Sex Traffic,” for

which he won another BAFTA TV Award and earned his second DGGB Award

nomination. The unflinching look at sex trafficking also won a number of international

awards, including eight BAFTA TV and four RTS Awards, both including Best Drama,

as well as the Jury Prize for Best Miniseries at the Reims International Television

Festival, and a Golden Nymph at the Monte Carlo Television Festival.

Yates more recently earned an Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding

Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special for his work on the 2005 HBO

movie “The Girl in the Café,” a love story starring Bill Nighy and Kelly Macdonald. His

other television credits include the telefilm “The Young Visitors,” starring Jim Broadbent

and Hugh Laurie, and the miniseries “The Sins,” starring Pete Postlethwaite and

Geraldine James.

Yates grew up in St. Helens, Merseyside, and studied Politics at the University of

Essex and at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He began his directing career

with the short film “When I Was a Girl,” which he also wrote. The film brought him the

prize for Best European Short Film at the Cork International Film Festival in Ireland and

a Golden Gate Award at the San Francisco Film Festival. It also assured his entrance into

the National Film and Television School in Beaconsfield, England.

His graduation film, “Good Looks,” won a Silver Hugo at the Chicago

International Film Festival. In 1998, Yates made his feature film directorial debut with

49

 

 

 

“The Tichborne Claimant,” starring Stephen Fry and John Gielgud. His most recent short

film, 2002’s “Rank,” was nominated for a BAFTA Award.

DAVID HEYMAN (Producer) is once again the producer of this, the fifth in the

series of film adaptations of J.K. Rowling’s hugely successful Harry Potter stories.

Educated in England and the United States, Heyman began his career as a

production runner on Milos Forman’s “Ragtime” and David Lean’s “A Passage to India.”

He moved to Los Angeles in 1986 to become a creative executive at Warner Bros.,

working on such films as “Gorillas in the Mist” and “Goodfellas.” Heyman became a

Vice President at United Artists in the late 1980s and subsequently embarked on a career

as an independent producer, making several films, including Ernest Dickenson’s “Juice,”

starring Tupac Shakur and Omar Epps, and the low-budget classic “The Daytrippers,”

which was directed by Greg Mottola and stars Liev Schreiber, Parker Posey, Hope Davis,

Stanley Tucci and Campbell Scott.

Having spent many years working in the States, it was in 1997 that Heyman

returned to the U.K. to set up Heyday Films. In addition to producing all of the Harry

Potter films, the company has gone on to produce a variety of projects for film and

television, including the feature “Taking Lives,” starring Angelina Jolie and Ethan

Hawke, and the television series “Threshold.”

Heyman is currently producing “The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas,” written and

directed by Mark Herman and starring David Thewlis and Vera Farmiga, and is a

producer on “I Am Legend,” directed by Frances Lawrence and starring Will Smith.

Later this year, in addition to producing “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,”

Heyman will produce “Is There Anybody There?,” directed by John Crowley and starring

Michael Caine.

Other Heyday films shooting this year include “Dogs of Babel,” directed by

Charles McDougall; “Yes Man,” directed by Peyton Reed; and “Unique,” directed by

David Goyer. Future projects include “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime,”

an adaptation of Mark Haddon’s best-selling novel, being written and directed by

Steve Kloves; and “The History of Love,” which Heyman will co-produce with Alfonso

Cuaron.

50

 

 

 

In 2003, Heyman won ShoWest’s Producer of the Year Award, the first British

producer to have ever been honored with this accolade.

DAVID BARRON (Producer) previously served as executive producer on both

“Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

Barron has worked in the entertainment industry for more than 25 years,

beginning his career in commercials before moving into television and film production.

In addition to his work as a producer, he has held a wide range of posts, including

location manager, assistant director, production manager and production supervisor,

working on such films as “The French Lieutenant’s Woman,” “The Killing Fields,”

“Revolution,” “Legend,” “The Princess Bride,” “The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne,”

“Hellbound,” “Night Breed” and Franco Zeffirelli’s “Hamlet.”

In 1991, Barron was appointed executive in charge of production on George

Lucas’ ambitious television project “The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles.” The

following year, he served as the line producer on the feature “The Muppet Christmas

Carol.”

In 1993, Barron joined Kenneth Branagh’s production team as associate producer

and unit production manager on “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.” That film began an

association with Branagh, with Barron going on to produce the director’s films “A

Midwinter’s Tale,” “Hamlet” and “Love’s Labour’s Lost.” Barron also produced Oliver

Parker’s “Othello,” in which Branagh starred with Laurence Fishburne.

In spring 1999, he formed his own company, Contagious Films, with British

director Paul Weiland. Barron more recently launched a second company, Runaway

Fridge Films.

MICHAEL GOLDENBERG (Screenwriter) recently co-wrote the screenplay

for the live-action feature “Peter Pan,” based on J.M. Barrie’s classic children’s tale. He

had earlier scripted Robert Zemeckis’ science fiction drama “Contact,” based on the

novel by Carl Sagan and starring Jodie Foster. Goldenberg made his feature filmmaking

debut writing and directing the romantic drama “Bed of Roses,” starring Christian Slater

and Mary Stuart Masterson.

51

 

 

 

Goldenberg also writes for the theater, where he received the Richard Rodgers

Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters for his musical “Down the

Stream.”

Currently, he is preparing “Uncertainty,” a futuristic drama that he will direct

from his own screenplay.

LIONEL WIGRAM (Executive Producer) was educated at Oxford University,

where he was one of the founding members of the Oxford Film Foundation. He started

working in the film business while still at Oxford, serving as a production assistant for

producer Elliott Kastner during Wigram’s summer holidays. Following graduation, he

went to work for Kastner in California. Wigram produced his first film, “Never on

Tuesday,” in 1987, followed by “Cool Blue,” starring Woody Harrelson, and “Warm

Summer Rain,” starring Kelly Lynch, in 1988. In the same period, Wigram was involved

in the development of the early drafts of what would become “Carlito’s Way.”

In 1990, Wigram joined Alive Films as a development executive and worked on

films by Wes Craven and Sam Shepard. He also produced “Cool as Ice,” and was an

executive producer on Steven Soderbergh’s “The Underneath.” In 1993, Wigram started

a chef management company, Alive Culinary Resources, with Alive owner Shep Gordon.

In addition to managing most of the top chefs in the U.S., they produced a cooking video

series for Time Life, which featured Emeril Lagasse for the first time.

In 1994, Wigram joined Renny Harlin and Geena Davis’s company, The Forge,

where he headed up development. Some of the projects on which he worked include

“The Long Kiss Goodnight,” “Cutthroat Island” and the HBO film “Mistrial.”

Wigram joined Warner Bros. in 1996 as a Vice President of Production. During

his tenure, he was responsible for buying the Harry Potter book series for the studio and

has overseen all of the installments of the franchise to date. He has also supervised such

projects as “The Avengers,” “The Big Tease,” “Charlotte Gray,” “Three Kings” and “The

Good German.”

In January 2005, Wigram moved into a first-look producing deal for Warner Bros.

He will continue to oversee the “Harry Potter” film franchise as executive producer. He

52

 

 

 

is also an executive producer on the upcoming film “August Rush.” Additionally,

Wigram is developing a new Sherlock Holmes film franchise for Warner Bros.

SLAWOMIR IDZIAK (Director of Photography) is an internationally regarded

cinematographer. In 2002, he earned both Academy Award and BAFTA Award

nominations for his work on Ridley Scott’s war drama “Black Hawk Down.” Earlier in

his career, he won Best Cinematography Awards from the 1993 Venice and Polish Film

Festivals and earned a French Cesar Award nomination for his collaboration with

Krzysztof Kieslowski’s on “Three Colors: Blue,” which Idziak also co-wrote.

Additionally, he won an award from the 1998 Berlin International Film Festival for his

haunting images in Michael Winterbottom’s “I Want You.”

Idziak has also lensed such films as Antoine Fuqua’s “King Arthur,” Taylor

Hackford’s “Proof of Life”; Deborah Warner’s “The Last September”; Cathal Black’s

“Love and Rage”; Andrew Niccol’s “Gattaca”; John Sayles’ “Men with Guns”; John

Duigan’s “Paranoid” and “The Journey of August King”; and the Krzysztof Kieslowski

films “The Double Life of Veronique,” “A Short Film About Killing” and “Blizna,”

which marked their first feature film collaboration.

A native of Poland, Idziak also teamed with director Krzysztof Zanussi on 11

films during the 1980s and early 90s, the more recent including “The Year of the Quiet

Sun” and “Wherever You Are…”

Between his film projects, Idziak also teaches at workshops and film schools

throughout the world.

STUART CRAIG (Production Designer) is one of the film industry’s most

honored production designers. A three-time Academy Award winner and two-time

BAFTA Award winner, he has served as the production designer on all of the Harry

Potter films. Craig received Oscar nominations for his work on “Harry Potter and the

Sorcerer’s Stone” and, most recently, “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” for which he

also won a BAFTA Award. Additionally, he garnered BAFTA Award nominations for

each of the previous Harry Potter movies.

53

 

 

 

Craig won his first Academy Award for his work on Richard Attenborough’s

acclaimed biopic “Gandhi.” He subsequently won Oscars for his artistry on Stephen

Frears’ “Dangerous Liaisons” and Anthony Minghella’s “The English Patient.” He has

also been Oscar-nominated for his production designs for David Lynch’s “The Elephant

Man,” for which he won his first BAFTA Award, Roland Joffe’s “The Mission” and

Attenborough’s “Chaplin.” Craig was also recognized with BAFTA Award nominations

for all of the aforementioned films, as well as Hugh Hudson’s “Greystoke: The Legend of

Tarzan, Lord of the Apes.”

Craig had a long association with director Richard Attenborough, with whom he

first worked as an art director on “A Bridge Too Far.” Continuing their creative

partnership, Craig was the production designer on “Cry Freedom,” “Shadowlands” and

“In Love and War,” in addition to “Gandhi” and “Chaplin.”

Craig’s additional credits as a production designer include Robert Redford’s “The

Legend of Bagger Vance,” Roger Michell’s “Notting Hill,” “The Avengers,” Stephen

Frears’ “Mary Reilly,” Agnieszka Holland’s “The Secret Garden,” “Memphis Belle” and

“Cal.” Earlier in his career, Craig served as art director on Richard Donner’s

“Superman.”

MARK DAY (Editor) is an award-winning editor, who has enjoyed a long

association with director David Yates. Last year, Day earned an Emmy Award

nomination for his editing work on the television movie “The Girl in the Cafè,” directed

by Yates. In 2005, he won a BAFTA TV Award and a Royal Television Society (RTS)

Award for Best Editor on the Yates-directed telefilm “Sex Traffic.” The year before, he

won a BAFTA Award and also earned a nomination for an RTS Award for his

collaboration with Yates on the miniseries “State of Play”

For his editing work on Yates-directed projects, Day was previously honored with

RTS and BAFTA Award nominations for the miniseries “The Way We Live Now,” and

another RTS Award nomination for the telefilm “The Young Visitors.” Day has also

worked with Yates on the miniseries “The Sins” and the short film “Rank.”

Day has also had multiple collaborations with other directors, including David

Blair on the feature “Mystics,” and the television projects “Anna Karenina,” “Split

54

 

 

 

Second” and “Donovan Quick”; Paul Greengrass on the feature “The Theory of Flight”

and the television movie “The Fix”; and John Schlesinger on the telefilms “The Tale of

Sweeney Todd,” “Cold Comfort Farm” and “A Question of Attribution.”

Day’s other television credits include such longform projects as Julian Farino’s

“Flesh and Blood,” Paul Seed’s “Murder Rooms,” Richard Eyre’s “Suddenly Last

Summer” and Jack Clayton’s “Memento Mori,” for which he was nominated for a

BAFTA TV Award.

NICHOLAS HOOPER (Composer) continued his long association with director

David Yates on “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.” Hooper won a BAFTA TV

Award for Best Original Score for his music for Yates’ television movie “The Young

Visitors.” His collaborations with Yates have also brought the composer three BAFTA

TV Award nominations for Best Original Score for the telefilms “The Way We Live

Now” and “The Girl in the Café,” and the series “State of Play.” Hooper has also teamed

with Yates on the feature film “The Tichborne Claimant,” as well as the short films

“Punch” and “Good Looks.”

Hooper most recently won a BAFTA TV Award for Best Original Score for the

television movie “Prime Suspect – The Final Act,” directed by Philip Martin and starring

Helen Mirren. He had earlier worked with Martin on the telefilm “Bloodlines.”

Hooper has also scored a wide range of film and television projects and

documentaries. His recent credits include the feature “The Heart of Me,” starring Helena

Bonham Carter; and the television movies “The Best Man,” “The Chatterley Affair,”

“My Family and Other Animals” and “Messiah: The Promise.” He also wrote the music

for the documentary feature “Land of the Tiger,” and multiple episodes of the National

Geographic series “Nature.”

TIM BURKE (Visual Effects Supervisor) earned Academy Award and BAFTA

Award nominations for his work as a visual effects supervisor on “Harry Potter and the

Prisoner of Azkaban.” In addition, the film won the Visual Effects Society’s award for

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Visual Effects Driven Motion Picture. Burke has also

55

 

 

 

served as a visual effects supervisor on the Harry Potter films “Harry Potter and the

Chamber of Secrets” and “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.”

A 20-veteran in the field of motion picture visual effects, he previously won an

Academy Award and received a BAFTA Award nomination as a member of the visual

effects team on Ridley Scott’s epic “Gladiator.” He also collaborated with Ridley Scott

as the visual effect supervisor on “Black Hawk Down” and “Hannibal.”

Burke also served as the visual effects supervisor on “A Knight’s Tale” and as the

digital effects supervisor on “Enemy of the State.” His additional credits include the

films “Babe: Pig in the City” and “Still Crazy” and the television movies “Merlin” and

“The Mill on the Floss.”

JANY TEMIME (Costume Designer) returns for her third Harry Potter film

following her work on “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” and “Harry Potter and

the Goblet of Fire.”

Temime most recently served as the costume designer on Alfonso Cuaron’s

“Children of Men,” starring Clive Owen, and Agnieszka Holland’s “Copying

Beethoven,” starring Ed Harris. Her recent credits also include such diverse films as

Beeban Kidron’s “Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason,” starring Renee Zellweger;

Werner Herzog’s “Invincible,” starring Tim Roth; and Mel Smith’s “High Heels and Low

Lifes,” starring Minnie Driver, for which Temime earned a British Independent Film

Award nomination. She had earlier won a BAFTA Cymru Award for her costume

designs for Marc Evans’ “House of America,” and the 1995 Utrecht Film Festival’s

Golden Calf for Best Costume Design for Marleen Gorris’ “Antonia’s Line,” the Oscar

winner for Best Foreign Language Film.

Temime is currently working on Martin McDonagh’s “In Bruges,” starring Ralph

Fiennes and Colin Farrell. Her other credits encompass more than 40 international

motion picture and television projects. Among her film credits are Todd Komarnicki’s

“Resistance”; Marleen Gorris’ “The Luzhin Defense”; Paul McGuigan’s “Gangster No.

1”; Ed Thomas’ “Rancid Aluminum”; Mike van Diem’s “The Character,” the 1998 Oscar

winner for Best Foreign Film; Danny Deprez’s “The Ball”; George Sluizer’s “The

56

 

 

 

Commissioner” and “Crimetime”; Ate de Jong’s “All Men Are Mortal”; and Frans

Weisz’s “The Last Call,” among others.

NICK DUDMAN (Creature & Make-Up Effects Designer) and his team have

created the make-up effects and the magical animatronic creatures in the Harry Potter

films, garnering BAFTA Award nominations for all of the films to date.

Dudman got his start working on the Jedi master Yoda as a trainee to famed

British make-up artist Stuart Freeborn, on “Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes

Back.” After apprenticing with Freeborn for four years, Dudman was asked to head up

the English make-up laboratory for Ridley Scott’s “Legend.” He subsequently worked

on the make-up and prosthetics for such films as “Mona Lisa,” “Labyrinth,” “Willow,”

“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” “Batman,” “Alien3” and “Interview with the

Vampire,” among others.

In 1995, Dudman’s career path widened into animatronics and large-scale

creature effects when he was asked to oversee the 55-man creature department for the

Luc Besson film “The Fifth Element,” for which he won a BAFTA Award for Visual

Effects. Since then, he has lead the creatures/make-up effects departments on several

blockbusters, including “Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace,” “The Mummy”

and “The Mummy Returns,” and consulted on the costume effects for “Batman Begins.”

Dudman recently designed the animatronics for Alfonso Cuaron’s “Children of Men.” In

2007, he was awarded a special achievement Genie by the Canadian Academy for the

make-up on “Beowulf and Grendel.”

In addition, Dudman’s company, Pigs Might Fly, creates and sells non-staining

blood.

57

 

 

 

Harry Potter ya quiere comenzar su quinto año de estudios en la Escuela

Hogwarts de Magia y Hechicería. El verano ha sido largo y solitario para él, y ya

tuvo bastante aguantando a los odiosos Dursley. No ha recibido ni siquiera una

nota de sus compañeros de estudios ni de sus mejores amigos, Ron Weasley y

Hermione Granger. No sabe nada de nadie tras su confrontación con el maligno

Lord Voldemort. Por eso, al recibir una carta, esperaba mejores noticias que las

que la misiva trae: Harry va a ser expulsado de Hogwarts, por haber utilizado

magia ilegalmente fuera de la escuela y en presencia de un Muggle, en este caso,

su molesto primo Dudley. No importa si él lo hizo en defensa del ataque no

provocado e inexplicable de dos Dementores.

Harry espera poder defenderse en la ficticia y ya arreglada corte que

orquestó el Ministro de Magia, Cornelius Fudge, quien tiene sus propias razones

para querer que el joven mago desaparezca de una vez por todas. Pero pese a las

intenciones de Fudge, Harry es absuelto en gran parte gracias a la intervención

del venerable Albus Dumbledore, Director de la Escuela Hogwarts. Al volver a

Hogwarts, Harry por primera vez se siente temeroso e incómodo. Es que él se ha

enterado, que a la mayoría de la comunidad de magos, les hicieron creer que su

reciente encuentro con Voldemort fue una mentira total, y ahora su integridad

como persona y como mago está en tela de juicio.

Harry se siente rechazado y solo, y todo el tiempo tiene atormentadoras

pesadillas que parecieran augurar siniestros eventos por venir. Aún peor, el

 

 

profesor Dumbledore, cuyos consejos necesita más que nunca, repentina y

extrañamente comienza a tomar distancia y a separarse de él.

Mientras tanto, Fudge nombró una nueva maestra de Defensa Contra las

Artes de la Oscuridad, la muy falsa profesora Dolores Umbridge. Su intención al

designarla era mantenerse informado sobre las idas y venidas de Dumbledore, y

a la vez, mantener a los estudiantes de Hogwarts en línea, especialmente a

Harry.

Pero el curso de magia de defensa “aprobado por el Ministerio” de la

profesora Umbridge, deja a los jóvenes magos muy mal preparados para

defenderse contra las Fuerzas de la Oscuridad que los amenazan. Por eso,

cuando Hermione y Ron se lo proponen, Harry, convencido, tratar de enderezar

las cosas él mismo. Se reúne en secreto con un pequeño grupo de estudiantes que

se llaman a ellos mismos “El Ejército de Dumbledore”. Harry les enseña a

defenderse contra las Artes de la Oscuridad, y prepara a los jóvenes magos para

la extraordinaria batalla, que él sabe que está por venir.

Warner Bros. Pictures presenta una producción Heyday Films, “

““H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy

P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx”

””. En la película actúan Daniel Radcliffe,

Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Helena Bonham Carter, Robbie Coltrane, Warwick

Davis, Ralph Fiennes, Michael Gambon, Brendan Gleeson, Richard Griffiths,

Jason Isaacs, Gary Oldman, Alan Rickman, Fiona Shaw, Maggie Smith, Imelda

Staunton, David Thewlis, Emma Thompson, y Julie Walters.

La película fue dirigida por David Yates, y producida por David Heyman

y David Barron. Michael Goldenberg escribió el guión, basándose en la novela de

J.K. Rowling. Lionel Wigram fue productor ejecutivo.

Tras las cámaras, el equipo creativo incluyó: al director de fotografía

Slawomir Idziak, al diseñador de producción Stuart Craig, al editor Mark Day, a

la diseñadora de vestuario Jany Temime, y al compositor Nicholas Hooper.

 

 

Simultáneamente con el estreno de la película en los cines comunes,

““H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx”: Una Experiencia® IMAX 3D podrá

verse en los cines IMAX® de todo el mundo. Utilizando la tecnología patentada

IMAX de conversión de 2 dimensiones a 3 dimensiones, aproximadamente 20

minutos de las escenas finales de la película fueron convertidas a Una

Experiencia® IMAX 3D, la cual brinda la sensación de sumergirse en un mundo

tridimensional. La película fue arreglada digitalmente con la tecnología IMAX

Experience® con tecnología registrada IMAX DMR® (Digital Re-mastering). Una

señal especial en la pantalla – un ícono verde guiñando en el borde inferior de la

pantalla- avisará a los espectadores cuándo ponerse las gafas especiales para ver

tridisionalmente. Al cambiar el ícono a color rojo, deberán sacárselas. IMAX®

,

IMAX® 3D, IMAX DMR®, IMAX MPX®, The IMAX Experience® y Una

Experiencia IMAX 3D ® son marcas registradas de la Corporación IMAX.

““H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx” será distribuida

mundialmente por Warner Bros. Pictures, una compañía Warner Bros.

Entertainment.

Esta película ha sido clasificada PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned =

Advertencia Especial para Padres – parte del material puede ser inapropiado

para menores de 13 años), por la asociación MPAA (Motion Picture Association

of America) dada sus “secuencias de fantasía violenta e imágenes que dan

miedo”.

www.harrypotterorderofthephoenix.com

Para descargar información y fotos de

HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX

 

 

del Internet, por favor visite: http://press.warnerbros.com

SOBRE LA PRODUCCIÓN

UNA NUEVA ORDEN

El quinto año de estudios en la Escuela Hogwarts es un gran cambio en la

vida de Harry Potter y también lo es para sus amigos y compañeros de clase.

Ahora que ya no son tan niños, de pronto tienen que enfrentarse con las opciones

y los problemas que conlleva convertirse en adultos… lo cual tiene sus propias

consecuencias. Con la vuelta y enfrentamiento con Lord Voldemort, y la muerte

de su amigo Cedric Diggory, Harry tuvo que crecer de repente, y ahora se volvió

mucho más maduro que sus amigos, y siente que tiene responsabilidades que

nunca antes se le hubieran ocurrido.

David Yates entra por primera vez en el mundo de Harry Potter como

director, y sobre ello comenta: -“Para mí fue muy interesante que esta secuela

suceda en el momento en que los estudiantes de la historia están madurando, y

todo se vuelve más complicado. Esta vez se trata de rebelión y de comprender

los límites de ser adulto. Se trata sobre el descubrir qué difícil se puede poner la

vida, sobre cómo uno, a veces, debe abrirse camino por sí mismo en este mundo.

Esta película tiene la magia y la diversión que J.K. Rowling pone en sus libros,

mezclada con todas las cosas maravillosas que comenzaron en las películas

 

 

anteriores. Ahora todo está junto, con ideas y cosas un poco más complicadas y

con elementos conmovedores que son más de adultos”.

David Heyman, el productor de todas las películas de Harry Potter,

comenta que la naturaleza de la historia es lo que lo llevó a elegir a Yates como

director. Yates es un director para la televisión británica que ha ganado premios,

y fue elegido para timonear la quinta película de la serie. -“David es un

fantástico director de actores, y también ha demostrado que puede manejar muy

bien los temas políticos de una manera entretenedora. En sí, esta no es una

película de tema político, sin embargo la política del mundo mágico se pone en

juego en este film. Nosotros pensamos que David lo manejaría brillantemente, y

en verdad lo hizo. El ya estaba bastante apasionado por el material que manejaría

y tenía una clara idea de los problemas emocionales que atravesarían los

personajes. El sabía que el punto de conexión nuestro y el de los espectadores en

esta historia, eran los personajes”.

-“Fue muy bueno ver cómo los muchachos inmediatamente se llevaron

muy bien con él, y él con ellos”- agrega Heyman –“al igual que sus personajes,

estos muchachos han crecido, y David los trataba como a iguales. David se daba

cuenta que sus jóvenes actores conocían a sus personajes muy bien por ese

entonces, por lo tanto siempre les pedía ideas, y dejaba que pusieran lo suyo en

la interpretación de sus papeles, como nunca antes lo habían hecho. Eso fue muy

interesante tanto para ellos como para nosotros”.

Daniel Radcliffe, que vuelve a retomar su papel de Harry Potter, detalla

diciendo: -“Me encantó trabajar con David. Es un hombre maravilloso que habla

en voz queda, y sin embargo nunca antes me sentí tan exigido como en esta

película. En parte tal vez haya sido por la naturaleza de la historia, y en parte por

su manera de dirigir. Nunca se conformaba tan sólo con un poco, siempre nos

exigía ir a fondo, que es exactamente lo que yo necesitaba. Es un director

brillante”.

 

 

-“David es genial; así que nos llevamos muy bien con él” - dice Rupert

Grint, el actor que interpreta a Ron Weasley, el mejor amigo de Harry -“El es

muy distinto de los otros directores porque tiene un estilo más relajado, y

siempre tiene buenas sugerencias para darnos”.

Emma Watson, quien interpreta a la leal amiga de Harry, Hermione

Granger, comenta: -“Fue muy lindo, porque David escuchaba qué teníamos para

decir nosotros sobre nuestros personajes. El respetaba el hecho de que nosotros

ya habíamos actuado estos roles en cuatro otras películas anteriormente.

Apreciaba la historia y a la vez, la relación especial que Dan, Rupert y yo

tenemos, porque eso le da realismo a la amistad entre Harry, Ron y Hermione. A

David le gusta que todos sus personajes sean lo más realistas posible”.

Yates trabajó a partir del guión de otro nuevo miembro del grupo de

producción, el guionista Michael Goldenberg. -“Para mí fue una alegría cuando

David Heyman me llamó y me propuso hacer el guión” - recuerda Goldenberg -

“Lo bueno de trabajar en una película de Harry Potter es que es algo tan gigante,

que no existen cuestiones de ego. Yo sé que es cliché, pero es mágico poder ser

parte de algo que se convirtió en un fenómeno asombroso, y tener la

oportunidad de llevarlo a la pantalla. Yo sentí que tenía una gran

responsabilidad a tomar. David Heyman lo hizo divertido, lo cual es lo correcto

en una película de Harry Potter, y Jo (J.K. Rowling) fue increíblemente dulce. Ella

fue más que generosa al darnos margen para trabajar, y lograr así la mejor

película posible. David Yates intentó que la historia tuviera un sentido de

realidad en todo momento, y creo que es eso lo que hace a lo mágico aún más

mágico”.

-“Era muy importante ser fiel al espíritu del libro”- detalla Goldenberg “

Esta historia en particular se trata en gran parte de las tribulaciones de Harry.

Harry se vuelve mayor y se da cuenta que las cosas no son tan en blanco y negro

como parecían ser al principio… y los adultos que él idolatraba tal vez tengan

más defectos y sean más humanos de lo que él pensaba. Quisimos explorar esos

 

 

temas, no sólo con Harry sino también con Ron y con Hermione. Todos estos

muchachos deben tratar ahora con temas mucho más complejos que los que ellos

jamás se imaginaban al iniciar la escuela Hogwarts”.

En “

““H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx”, las peripecias de Harry

comienzan cuando él está pasando otro interminable verano con los Dursley.

Para empeorar las cosas, él siente que sus mejores amigos Ron y Hermione se

han alejado de él, dado que inexplicablemente no le escribieron en todo el

verano. Eso no solamente lo hiere sino que es raro, dado los tumultuosos y

trágicos eventos del año anterior.

El productor David Barron comenta: -“Pobre Harry. Después de todo lo

que le pasó quedó aislado en Little Whinging sin ninguna noticia de nadie. El

piensa que todo el mundo lo está ignorando - Ron, Hermione, hasta el mismo

Dumbledore – y eso agregado al estrés de ser adolescente, es tal vez demasiado

para soportar. Este es un costado de Harry que nunca antes habíamos visto. Aquí

no comienza siendo el muchacho calmo y asentado que vimos anteriormente, no

sin una buena justificación al menos”.

Con esto en mente, el insufrible y provocador Dudley Dursley eligió un

pésimo momento para su pasatiempo favorito: tratar de provocar a Harry. Sin

embargo, su pelea termina abruptamente cuando de repente un par de

Dementores los atacan, y Harry se vé forzado a realizar el encantamiento

Patronus para salvar las vidas de ambos. Pocos momentos después llega una

carta a la dirección Privet Drive, informándole a Harry que lo han expulsado de

la Escuela Hogwarts por uso ilegal de la magia. Harry se desespera y en cambio,

los Dursley están deleitados.

Pese a todo, no hay que perder la esperanza. Esa noche un grupo de

Aurores (cazadores de magos tenebrosos), entre los que estaban Alastor ‘Ojoloco’

Moody, Kingsley Shacklebolt y no-me-llames-Nymphadora Tonks, llegan a la

puerta de Harry y se lo llevan, diciéndole que Dumbledore organizó una

 

 

apelación a su favor, en contra de su expulsión, en una audiencia formal en el

Ministerio de la Magia.

Pero, primero deberán desviarse para ir a un lugar secreto en donde

Harry descubrirá todas las cosas que sucedieron mientras que él estaba

secuestrado en Little Whinging. Al llegar al número 12 de la calle Grimmauld

Place –lugar que si no sabes que está allí, no está allí – Harry vuelve a

encontrarse con sus amigos Ron y Hermione. Es allí donde él se entera por

primera vez sobre la Orden del Fénix: -“una organización clandestina formada

originalmente por Dumbledore para combatir las fuerzas del mal representadas

por Voldemort” – explica David Heyman - “Ellos se reúnen en secreto, en gran

parte porque Fudge, quien está a cargo del Ministerio de la Magia, se siente

amenazado por Dumbledore, y trata de no escuchar historias sobre la vuelta de

Voldemort. Pero los muchachos del grupo de la Orden saben que Voldemort está

juntando seguidores y su poder está creciendo”.

Harry ahora sabe que sus padres formaron parte de la Orden del Fénix

original. En la actualidad, entre sus miembros activos están Molly y Arthur

Weasley, Remus Lupin, Severus Snape y, para su sorpresa y deleite, Sirius Black,

quien abrió la casa de la familia Black para que sirviera como lugar de encuentro

para la Orden del Fénix. David Yates dice: -“Sirius no puede salir porque aún lo

buscan. No puede ayudar demasiado, por eso presta su casa a la Orden”.

Gary Oldman, quien dio vida a Sirius Black en “Harry Potter and the

Prisoner of Azkaban”, cuenta: -“Sirius es un hombre atormentado por estar

falsamente acusado y por haber sido prisionero en Azkaban por tantos años. Se

ha quedado emocionalmente estancado en el pasado, en los primeros días de la

Orden. De muchas maneras, su relación con Harry para él, es como volver al

pasado. Harry se parece mucho a su papá, James, quien era el mejor amigo de

Sirius. Sirius es el padrino de Harry, y para él eso es algo muy importante. Entre

Harry y él hay una relación muy especial, la cual poco a poco se fue haciendo

muy fuerte”.

 

 

-“Para Harry la relación es parecida” – explica Radcliffe -“Sirius ve a un

joven James en Harry, y Harry, a través de Sirius, puede saber más cosas sobre su

papá y su relación con Sirius”.

Para Harry, la Orden del Fénix es una manera de conectarse con su

pasado… y mucho más. -“Oficialmente él no pertenece a la Orden, no obstante,

él se siente como parte de ella porque la mayoría de sus amigos están allí. La

Orden significa mucho para Harry, porque sus padres habían pertenecido a la

original. Por eso la Orden tiene importancia emotiva para él, y a la vez, le da la

oportunidad de enfrentar a Voldemort” - explica Radcliffe.

PROCEDIMIENTOS EN EL MINISTERIO

Antes de que Harry piense siquiera en pelear contra Voldemort, debe

volver a ser admitido en Hogwarts. Para eso, deberá defenderse ante el

Ministerio de la Magia.

El decorado del gran atrio del Ministerio de la Magia, es en gran parte lo

que el diseñador de producción Stuart Craig describe como “un poster de Fudge

al estilo de propaganda soviética”.

El diseñador agrega que, pese a que la gente vuela por los pasillos y los

magos se envían memos entre ellos a través de su propio correo aéreo, -“El

Ministerio es una burocracia. En Inglaterra, los edificios del gobierno

frecuentemente tienen el diseño arquitectónico victoriano del siglo XIX, el cual es

muy decorativo. El Ministerio además está bajo tierra, así que lo primero que

hicimos fue visitar una de las estaciones Tube más antiguas de Londres

(tren/metro subterráneo). Muchas de esas estaciones tienen extravagantes

decoraciones hechas en cerámicas. Mezclamos eso con un mundo subterráneo

inventado, lleno de túneles, y recubrimos esos túneles con cerámica negra

brillante, la cual se ve muy interesante fotográficamente. Eso presentó un gran

 

 

desafío para el director de fotografía Slawomir Idziak, ya que la luz se reflejaba

por todos lados”.

El atrio del Ministerio fue el escenario más grande jamás construido para

una película de Harry Potter. Tenía 200 pies de largo, por 120 pies de ancho y 30

pies de altura. Se necesitaron 30,000 cerámicas para cubrirlo, las cuales tuvieron

que ser instaladas una por una. En la pantalla, el atrio se ve aún mucho más

grande de lo que era, gracias a efectos visuales.

Escoltado por el señor Weasley, Harry entra en el ministerio a través de la

entrada para visitantes, la cual con toda intención y para todos los propósitos, se

vé como una cabina de teléfonos común, ubicada en el corazón de Londres. “

Pensamos que iba a ser divertido ubicar al Ministerio de la Magia justo debajo

del Ministerio de los Muggles, así que pusimos la cabina telefónica en una vereda

muy cerca del Ministerio de Defensa inglés. Así, aunque los Muggles no lo saben,

bajo el Ministerio de Defensa Británico está el Ministerio de la Magia”- dice Craig

sonriendo.

Yates agrega: -“Uno de los elementos más graciosos de Harry Potter es

que existe un mundo de magia al lado de nuestro mundo Muggle. A veces está

en la puerta de al lado del lugar donde estamos, otras, justo debajo de nuestros

pies, si tan solo uno se fijara… De hecho, los dos mundos muchas veces se tocan,

y nosotros ¡ni nos damos cuenta!”

Durante la audiencia de Harry las cosas no van como Fudge lo había

planeado, gracias a Dumbledore y a un testigo inesperado. Harry es sobreseído

de todos los cargos, pero cuando termina la audiencia y trata de hablarle a

Dumbledore, su amado mentor se escapa rápidamente, evitando siquiera hacer

contacto visual con Harry, el joven mago.

Retomando el papel de Albus Dumbledore, está Michael Gambon, quien

dice: -“Para Harry, Dumbledore es todo, y en esta película ese ídolo se derrumba

un tanto. El poder de Dumbledore está en gran peligro, lo cual lo vuelve más

 

 

humano, ¿no? El detalle además, dio una nueva faceta a desarrollar en mi

personaje, lo que fue una experiencia interesante”.

Aún impresionado por la reacción de Dumbledore, Harry vuelve a

Hogwarts. Pero la prueba que allí le espera, y el comportamiento de sus

compañeros, va a ser algo completamente diferente, algo a lo que nunca se

enfrentó.

LA VIDA NO ES TAN COLOR DE ROSA

Al regresar a Hogwarts, Harry se da cuenta que todos los miran con cierta

desconfianza, y como si eso fuera poco, el titular del diario “The Daily Prophet” lo

llama “Harry el Complotador”, y lo acusa abiertamente de mentir sobre el

retorno de Lord Voldemort. Harry se siente solo y rechazado y no quiere aceptar

las ofertas de ayuda de Ron y de Hermione. El piensa que nadie lo entiende, y

que ninguno sabe por lo que él está pasando. Ni siquiera sus propios amigos.

Daniel Radcliffe comenta al respecto: -“El está un poco en el papel de

mártir, pero creo que es parte de lo atractivo de Harry: él no es perfecto. Su

personalidad tiene falencias, y eso es lo que lo vuelve tan humano. Harry es una

buena persona, si bien está lleno de dudas personales, y pienso que la mayoría

de la gente se identifica con eso”.

Yates dice: -“Esta es una etapa interesante en la vida de Harry. Siente que

el “The Daily Prophet”, el diario del Ministerio de la Magia, quiere desacreditarlo

y publica calumnias, y lo que es peor, la gente está comenzando a creerlas. Por

eso, cuando Harry vuelve a Hogwarts, no se siente tan cómodo y a salvo como se

sentía siempre. El se siente como sapo de otro pozo, y va a tener que decidir si va

a dejar que esa situación continúe así para siempre o si va a confiar en el apoyo

de sus amigos, con los que pasó por tantas cosas a través de sus años de estudio.

Por momentos, uno cree que Harry podría elegir cualquiera de las opciones, y

eso es lo emocionante de la historia, particularmente para Harry”.

 

 

-“Dan como actor, también tuvo que enfrentarse con algo distinto esta vez,

porque su personaje tiene una actuación compleja”- explica el director -“Lo

bueno es que Dan no tiene miedo de actuar y es muy determinado. Hubo

momentos en los que hacíamos toma tras toma de filmación, y uno podía verle

las ganas de hacerlo mejor y mejor cada vez, en los ojos. Eso es lo que me gusta

de él: quiere actuar lo mejor que pueda”.

Este año en Hogwarts hay una nueva profesora, la profesora Dolores

Umbridge, maestra de Defensa Contra las Artes de la Oscuridad, interpretada

por la premiada actriz Imelda Staunton. La profesora Umbridge se viste de rosa

de la cabeza a los pies, tiene una sonrisa forzada y una manera de hablar medio

cantando, que aunque aparenta ser dulce, deja ver su verdadera naturaleza.

Yates explica: -“Fudge está obsesionado con Dumbledore, porque piensa

que quiere quedarse con su puesto. Por eso, pone a su lugarteniente más

confiable - Dolores Umbridge – en Hogwarts, para que ella sea sus ojos y sus

oídos allí. Por su lado, la profesora Umbridge decide que su misión será sacar a

todos los inútiles de la escuela y que la enseñanza en Hogwarts se vuelva

perfecta y ortodoxa, a la manera que el Ministerio piensa que debería ser. Y eso

claro, va a resultar en una gran colisión de valores”.

-“Sin ninguna duda ella es una enemiga encubierta”- afirma Barron – “No

es tan “rosa” como ella se pinta. Pienso que Fudge no sabe muy bien lo que hace

cuando la envía allí. Es más, creo que ni siquiera se imagina lo que ella es capaz

de hacer”.

-“Umbridge es una controladora obsesiva, y el orden es su prioridad

número uno”- dice David Heyman -“Cualquier cosa diferente de su punto de

vista casi fachista de cómo deben ser las cosas, no tiene posibilidad de sobrevivir

en su mundo. Definitivamente no piensa que debe inspirar las mentes de sus

estudiantes, sino más bien llenarlas con los pensamientos y las ideas del

Ministerio”.

 

 

Los estudiantes de Hogwarts no son el único objetivo que tiene en vista

Dolores Umbridge. Los empleados y los profesores de la escuela no están más a

salvo de sus resentidos ataques que los alumnos. La profesora de Adivinación,

Sybill Trelawney, interpretada por Emma Thompson, no pudo ver que

Umbridge la despediría sin siquiera pestañar, y el profesor de Encantamientos

Flitwick, en la actuación de Warwick Davis, supuestamente tampoco llega al

nivel que exige la profesora Umbridge. Inclusive los profesores más respetados,

como Severus Snape, al quien da vida el actor Alan Rickman, y Minerva

McGonagall, interpretada por Maggie Smith, no pueden interferir con las

acciones de la garra rosa de la Gran Inquisidora. Nadie está a salvo del poder

implacable de Umbridge. Ni siquiera el director de la escuela, Albus

Dumbledore.

Heyman agrega: -“Su objetivo es desacreditar a Dumbledore y tomar el

control de la escuela, en nombre del Ministerio. No hay nada que pueda

interponerse en su camino. Imelda pudo interpretar el papel con una sonrisa”.

Staunton, la actriz, comenta al respecto: -“Hay mucha gente así. Por fuera

son encantadores, pero por dentro son algo totalmente distinto. Para mí este fue

un papel muy interesante para actuar. Pienso que Dolores, personalmente, cree

que no hace nada malo. Está convencida que lo que hace es por el bien de todos.

Ese es el tipo de persona más temible, simplemente porque solo pueden ver un

costado de las cosas. Así, es consecuente consigo misma”.

-“Imelda estuvo maravillosa en su personaje”- declara Yates - “Es una

actriz muy talentosa, con mucho sentido de los tiempos cómicos. Ella puedo

mostrar a la profesora Umbridge como a una mujer muy compleja, y no como a

una caricatura”.

Staunton basó su interpretación en la manera en que su personaje está

descrito en el libro: -“Se supone que la profesora Umbridge es muy fea, como un

sapo, por eso cuando la gente me decía ‘¡estarás perfecta para el personaje!’ yo

les contestaba, “¡Bueno! ¡Muchas gracias!’”- dice riendo la actriz –“Pero en serio

 

 

me gustó mucho que me elijan para hacer este papel, porque en verdad es un rol

de oro, y me siento en el cielo por haber podido entrar en este maravilloso

mundo… además, tengo que admitir, que ahora tengo mucho status en mi casa,

con mi hija de 12 años”.

Staunton trabajó conjuntamente con la diseñadora de vestuario Jany

Temime para crear el aspecto final de Umbridge. -“Nos divertimos muchos

creando esta no- tan -buena persona ‘redondeada’” –dice la actriz- “Yo no quería

que su aspecto fuera de mala, porque pensé que era importante que tuviera una

apariencia cálida, suave… porque en realidad ella no es ni lo uno ni lo otro”.

La vestuarista Temime revela que, para darle un toque de suavidad a

Umbridge:-“le puse muchos rellenos a Imelda, porque ella es una mujer

flaquita”. La diseñadora también utilizó telas peluditas y suaves para los

vestidos de Umbridge para darle a ella esa misma calidez.

El color de los vestidos no obstante, ya estaba determinado en el libro:

rosa, rosado y más rosa. -“En cada toma, ella tiene un vestido de un distinto color

de rosa”- dice Temime - “A medida que Umbridge va ganando poder, el color se

vuelve más y más fuerte y más atroz, hasta que termina envuelta en un

estridente color cereza”.

El color rosado de Umbridge se llevó hasta el entorno de su oficina, la cual

Stuart Craig y su equipo, decoraron en una extendida paleta de rosas, adornada

con puntillas, terciopelo y pequeños detalles aquí y allá. Los muebles son estilo

francés, y el diseñador quiso mostrarlos -“con curvas y líneas definidas, como

algo que en parte se parece bastante a la personalidad real de su dueña. Un

detalle interesante en su oficina, son los 200 platos con gatitos, algunos de ellos

decididamente ruidosos y muy activos”.

Completamente lo opuesto, el aula de la profesora Umbridge es mucho

más austera, complementando su estilo de enseñanza: ella limita a los

estudiantes severamente, y con toda intención les da un libro de texto para

corregir lo que según ella hacen mal. Rupert Grint comenta: -“Las técnicas de

 

 

enseñanza de Umbridge son muy raras, teniendo en cuenta que ella es la maestra

que enseña técnicas de Defensa Contra las Artes de la Oscuridad. A su parecer

no debería haber progreso, y los alumnos deberían estudiar pura teoría sin

aplicación práctica, lo cual es ridículo en una escuela de magia”.

Emma Watson está de acuerdo con Grint. -“Es como si no hubiera ya más

lecciones de Defensa Contra las Artes de la Oscuridad, porque a los alumnos no

se les permite usar magia. Para una mente tan dinámica como la de Hermione,

eso es como una bofetada. Ella no se aguanta quedarse allí sentada y ser tratada

como una idiota. Eso la pone loca, porque para ella aprender es lo más

importante en la vida. Por primera vez Hogwarts, que siempre había sido un

lugar muy seguro y estable para Harry, Ron y Hermione, ya no es seguro, sino

más bien un lugar peligroso y que da miedo”.

Es peligroso porque los alumnos no aprenden a pelear o a defenderse…

especialmente teniendo en cuenta que están en un mundo en donde el Señor

Tenebroso anda suelto.

EL EJÉRCITO DE DUMBLEDORE

Según va la profesora Umbridge desplegando su creciente poder en

Hogwarts, impone nuevas y muy estrictas Reglas Educacionales, una más

restrictiva que la otra. Casi diariamente se proclaman nuevos reglamentos que se

pegan en las paredes, prohibiendo cualquier cosa que pudiera ser subversiva. Sin

embargo, su complot no tendrá lo buenos resultados que ella espera, pues su

mano de hierro hace que los estudiantes se resuelvan con más fuerza que nunca

a desafiar su autoridad.

Yates dice: -“Es interesante que al tratar de obtener poder absoluto, en

última instancia Umbridge logra exactamente lo opuesto”.

Hermione es la primera en actuar, e incita a sus compañeros a la acción.

Watson comenta al respecto: -“Ellos saben que si no aprenden encantamientos no

 

 

van a poder defenderse. Si bien el Ministerio de la Magia niega que Voldemort

ha vuelto, ellos no piensan lo mismo. Ellos le creen a Harry; y saben que hay algo

tenebroso y horroroso rondando. Creo que esa es la razón por la cual Hermione,

por primera vez en su vida, siente la necesidad de rebelarse. Ahora, ella se da

cuenta que hacer lo que le dicen que haga no va a funcionar. Uno no puede

confiar en las autoridades siempre, algunas veces uno tiene que confiar en sí

mismo”.

Con el apoyo de Hermione y de Ron, Harry toma la responsabilidad de

enseñar a los estudiantes de Hogwarts a defenderse contra las Artes de la

Oscuridad. Radcliffe dice: -“Al principio Harry no quiere hacerlo, pero Hermione

como siempre lo convence, porque aunque a él no le guste, ella tiene razón” –

dice el joven actor riendo -“Entonces trabajamos en secreto y formamos el

Ejército de Dumbledore. Harry se vuelve el maestro de todos ellos, y usa sus

conocimientos para entrenar a los estudiantes a luchar. Según él lo vé, pronto

habrá una guerra, y el peligro creciente se siente por todos lados. Si la profesora

Umbridge no nos enseña lo que necesitamos saber, si debemos pelear, no

tendremos posibilidades de salir vivos”.

David Heyman señala que el pasar de ser alumno a ser maestro,

representa un momento muy importante en la vida del personaje. -“Al comienzo

vemos a Harry como si fuera un forastero. El siente que la gente no confía en él y

que no le creen nada. Eso lo lleva a sentir que él ya no pertenece a ese lugar.

Eventualmente, se da cuenta que ese es su lugar, y que sí pertenece allí. No sólo

eso, sino que la gente quiere seguirlo. Eso es algo muy fuerte y emocionante, ver

a Harry que pasa de sentirse solo, aún estando con su grupo de amigos, a ser el

líder del grupo. Es más, resulta ser mejor maestro que muchos que tuvo él”.

Uno de los miembros del grupo es la etérea Luna Lovegood, una

muchacha de hablar suave con una personalidad un tanto rara, que parece pasar

de largo de lo que la gente dice de ella. Esta es la primera vez que el personaje

 

 

aparece en una película de Harry Potter, y al mismo tiempo es el debut como

actriz profesional de Evanna Lynch.

Dada las cualidades únicas de Luna, elegir una actriz para llenar ese

papel, fue una tarea difícil. La directora de casting Fiona Weir y los cineastas,

entrevistaron a docenas de postulantes, pero ninguna juntaba todos los requisitos

para la imagen que querían de Luna, entonces decidieron hacer una llamada

abierta a nuevas postulantes. Se presentaron más de 15 mil muchachas de todos

los lugares de Inglaterra, e hicieron cola durante larguísimas horas, con tal de

tener una oportunidad, y poder tener una entrevista. Una de las muchachas era

Evanna Lynch, una gran fanática de Harry Potter, a quien le fascinaba el

personaje de Luna, desde que había leído el libro H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff

t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx. -“Me encantó desde el principio”- dice Lynch -“Me gusta su manera

de ser honesta con todo el mundo, inclusive con ella misma. Ella es libre y

graciosa, es como si flotara por la vida, por eso casi todos creen que es una

‘lunática’, pero en realidad, no lo es. En verdad ella es muy inteligente – a su

manera-y tiene muy buen sentido de las cosas”.

Lynch inmediatamente se sintió identificada con Luna al leer sobre el

personaje en el libro. Ella filmó un video de ella misma interpretando uno de los

diálogos de Luna, y lo envió a la casa productora para ver si la podían considerar

para el papel. Poco después, se enteró de que habría una selección abierta de

actrices. Al respecto cuenta: -“Yo tenía que ir…era lo que tenía que hacer”.

Convenció a su papá para que la llevase, y viajaron ambos desde el sur de

Irlanda, y pasaron a formar la larga cola con miles de candidatas que tenían su

misma ambición. Pero seguramente no la confianza que ella tenía en sí misma. “

Yo no estaba nerviosa, porque para mí, ser Luna, era una cosa natural”.

Los cineastas estuvieron completamente de acuerdo. David Barron

recuerda: -“Fiona Weir entrevistó a las 15 mil postulantes, hasta que en la

selección quedaron 29 candidatas. Fiona las filmó y nos envió un DVD de todas

ellas. Nos dijo que allí había una muchacha muy especial, pero no nos dijo cuál.

 

 

Al llegar a la postulante número nueve, llamé a Fiona y le dije: ‘debe ser la

número nueve’. Y así era Evanna. ¡Era simplemente fantástica!”.

Heyman por su lado dice: -“La diferencia entre Evanna y todas las otras

chicas que entrevistamos, es que las otras muchachas podían actuar como Luna;

en cambio Evanna Lynch es Luna”.

Jany Temime comenta que Lynch inclusive hizo aportes en cuanto al

vestuario que debía tener Luna. -“Ella fue muy específica en cuanto a ciertos

detalles. Yo hice unos aretes especiales para ella, que tenían la forma de

rabanitos. Ella insistió en que tenían que ser anaranjados. Sin ninguna duda

conocía muy bien su personaje. Quisimos asegurarnos de que el vestuario de

Luna reflejara a la muchacha con su gusto muy personal, y sus intereses

especiales, pero al mismo tiempo, no debía ser tan distinta que no tuviera nada

que ver con los otros estudiantes”.

Otro de los miembros de Ejército de Dumbledore, es Neville Longbottom,

en la actuación de Matthew Lewis. Neville tiene sus propios problemas para

encajar entre sus compañeros, pero al final demuestra ser verdaderamente uno

de ellos, al descubrir el lugar perfecto para que el grupo se pueda entrenar en

secreto: la Sala Multipropósito. La sala sólo aparece cuando se la necesita, y toma

la forma necesaria en el momento, pero permanece invisible para cualquiera que

no está dentro de ella.

Stuart Craig comenta sobre ella: -“Le dimos a la Sala Multipropósito un

aspecto neutral. Sus paredes son espejos que no dejan ver en dónde empieza y

en dónde termina el espacio real, o el reflejado. Yo pensé que sería muy

apropiado que las paredes lo reflejaran a uno y a lo que uno necesitara en ese

momento. Por eso, al estar dentro de la Sala, si ellos necesitaban libros o

almohadones, o Mortíferos de mentira para practicar luchar, aparecerían, al igual

que en el libro”.

Pero hacer realidad el escenario de la sala espejada, presentó ciertas

dificultades y necesidades. Craig comenta: -“Obviamente, los espejos

 

 

presentaron un gran problema, porque no sólo reflejan a los actores, sino

también a las cámaras, a la gente que trabaja en la filmación, a los equipos de

iluminación… Tuvimos que cambiar los ángulos de la cámara en cada toma, y en

otras tomas, utilizamos un spray especial para empañar los espejos y matar los

reflejos”.

Para minimizar uno de los problemas, Craig y el director de fotografía

Slawomir Idziak, diseñaron un ingenioso sistema de iluminación por debajo del

piso, con el cual podían iluminar el escenario entre las rejas ubicadas en el piso.

En cierto momento, pareció que el sistema no funcionaría como lo habían

planeado, porque -“iluminaba las suelas de los zapatos de la gente de muy mala

manera”- cuenta Craig - “Por eso, terminamos cubriendo las suelas de los

zapatos con terciopelo negro, y toda la gente del equipo de filmación debió

ponerse protectores de zapatos como usan en la sala de operaciones de los

hospitales, de color azul. Así evitamos que trajeran tierra al escenario, pues debía

ser absolutamente negro, para no exponer las luces bajo el piso”.

MUÉRDAGO

Cuando son las vacaciones por las Navidades en Hogwarts, la clase

clandestina de Harry también se suspende, si bien sin demasiado entusiasmo.

Los estudiantes se van yendo, pero alguien permanece en la escuela: la

encantadora Cho Chang, actuada por Katie Leung. Harry vio a Cho por primera

vez en “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”, y aunque se atraen mutuamente,

las cosas entre ellos son complicadas, dada su mutua relación con Cedric

Diggory. El muchacho había sido la primera víctima de Lord Voldemort, luego

del retorno de este último. Al entrar en la Sala Multipropósito, se revela lo que

hay en sus corazones, entonces la Sala hace aparecer un ramito de muérdago, lo

que lleva al momento que tantos fanáticos de Harry Potter esperan desde hace

tiempo—el primer beso de amor de Harry.

 

 

-“Yo estaba un poco nervioso, porque yo sabía que Katie estaba nerviosa”

– admite Radcliffe -“No se trataba sólo del beso en sí, sino de la compleja relación

que existe entre Cho y Harry. Pero repetimos la escena varias veces, y al final

dejó de ser tan tremenda cosa, en verdad. Todo estuvo bien, y nos divertimos

mucho”.

-Por su parte, la nobel actriz Leung, comenta: -“Yo estaba muy nerviosa,

porque éste era mi primer beso en una actuación. Pero David Yates fue muy

bueno. Nos dijo exactamente qué quería, y logró que todo fuera menos

intimidante”- luego ella explica sobre el beso -“al principio era medio raro, pero

Daniel me ayudó muchísimo, y todo salió bien. Me gustó mucho… además

Daniel besa muy bien”- detalla sonriendo.

Yates cuenta: -“Queríamos que Dan y Katie se sintieran lo más cómodos

posible, por lo que sacamos a la mayor parte de la gente del set, y creamos una

atmósfera más íntima”.

Tal vez todas esas preparaciones del director ayudaron mucho a la pareja

de actores, pero no lograron calmar los nervios de muchos de los miembros del

equipo de filmación, que por mucho tiempo había visto crecer a Daniel Radcliffe

a través de todas las películas de Harry Potter.

Heyman relata: -“Muchos de nosotros conocemos a Daniel desde que él

tenía 10 años. Creció ante nuestros propios ojos. Entonces lo cuidamos, y lo

protegemos. Y he aquí que nos encontramos todos en el momento en que él actúa

su primer beso. Era raro. Yo pensaba ‘Yo no tendría que estar mirando esto’” –

dice riendo- “pero todo fue perfecto, y pienso que para los espectadores la escena

va a ser dulce y hermosa”.

Heyman continúa diciendo: -“Una de las mejores cosas de trabajar en las

películas de Harry Potter fue ver crecer a estos muchachos, y ver florecer su

talento. Son buenos chicos, amables, sensibles, brillantes, y creo que su actuación

en esta película va a mostrar cuánto crecieron como personas y como actores”.

 

 

TODAS LAS CRITURAS GRANDES Y NO TAN PEQUEÑAS

Al volver a comenzar las clases, la profesora Umbridge está más

determinada que nunca a encontrar a los alumnos rebeldes y a poner fin a sus

actividades subversivas. El sufriente conserje Argus Filch no tuvo mucha suerte

al tratar de encontrarlos. Entonces ella enlista a los estudiantes de la Casa

Slytherin, liderados por el enemigo de Harry, Draco Malfoy, para que espíen

para ella. Tom Felton vuelve a interpretar el personaje del joven Malfoy, quien

para ganarse más créditos escolares, se convierte en un miembro de la Brigada

Inquisitorial de la profesora Umbridge. Además, tiene la ventaja de que así, él

cobra poder sobre Harry Potter. Mientras tanto, nadie supervisa el creciente

poder de la profesora Umbridge, y ella ya no esconde que quiere sacar de

Hogwarts a todos los que no le caen bien.

Rubeus Hagrid, el cuidador de los animales y los jardines de Hogwarts,

sabe que es cuestión de tiempo el que lo saquen de la escuela. Entonces les pide a

Harry, a Ron y Hermione un favor especial. Cuando él no esté, ellos van a tener

que cuidar a su hermanastro Grawp, un gigante de 16 pies de altura.

Para llevar a Grawp a la pantalla, fue necesaria una mezcla de diseño,

captura de movimientos, efectos visuales y el talento del actor Tony Maudsley.

Heyman detalla: -“Decidimos que Grawp debía ser inocente y con muy poco

sentido de atención. Trajimos a Tony Maudsley, y él y David Yates, pasaron

mucho tiempo desarrollando lo que terminaría siendo Grawp a través del

proceso de captura de movimientos”.

Yates comenta: -“Tony Maudsley se transformó en el personaje, y le dio

sentido real e inteligencia a cada uno de sus movimientos. Pero la imagen que se

vé, es el resultado de efectos visuales, si bien Tony fue quien le dio alma y vida”.

Grawp tiene sentimientos, y eso se vé instantáneamente cuando queda

prendado de Hermione, que no puede menos que sentirse halagada. -“Hermione

 

 

piensa que Grawp es dulce”- aclara Emma Watson -“Es muy tierno en todo lo

que se refiere a Hermione, y ella pareciera ser la única que tiene algún control

sobre él, lo cual es muy gracioso. Yo sé que Grawp es en su mayor parte, el

resultado de efectos especiales, pero se las ingeniaron para hacerlo ver muy real.

Tiene ojos de perrito bueno, y yo no pude evitar encariñarme con él”.

El diseñador de criaturas y efectos especiales con maquillaje, Nick

Dudman, revela que tuvieron que construir una cabeza de gran tamaño para

Grawp, para que “actuase” con los actores en el set de filmación. También se

construyó un modelo tridimensional de él, para que el equipo de efectos visuales

pudiera escanearlo y ponerlo en las computadoras. -“Luego definimos cómo iban

a ser su pelo, sus ojos y sus dientes, los cuales nosotros controlábamos”.

-“Las escenas en las que estaba Grawp eran asombrosas”- afirma Rupert “

Habían puesto esta cabeza enorme con hombros en el set, pero uno hasta se

olvidaba que Grawp no estaba todo allí. Esas fueron algunas de mis escenas

favoritas durante la filmación, porque cuando a Grawp le gusta Hermione y la

levanta, Ron se pone celoso y trata de rescatarla. El quiere mostrarse como un

héroe, y trata de golpear al gigante, pero ya se imaginarán cómo termina eso”-

dice sonriendo el actor -“Fue muy divertido, porque me tocó hacer unos trucos

de acción cuando el gigante me hace volar por los aires”.

Hagrid esconde a Grawp en las profundidades del Bosque Prohibido,

donde también habitan los Centauros. El equipo de efectos visuales, encabezado

por el supervisor Tim Burke, trabajó junto con Dudman y el equipo de diseño,

para crear a esas nobles criaturas. Los Centauros ya se habían visto en “Harry

Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”. Burke explica: -“Tuvimos Centauros en la

primera película, pero los espectadores verán los grandes cambios desde

entonces. Ya no son mitad hombre y mitad caballo, ahora son seres especiales”.

-“Los Centauros son criaturas del bosque, son poderosos, y se sienten muy

orgullosos de sus territorios, a los cuales protegen. Ellos representan todo lo que

 

 

la profesora Umbridge odia, porque para ella, ellos no son pura raza. No son ni

una cosa ni la otra”- explica Heyman.

Algo totalmente nuevo en Harry Potter, son unas criaturas esqueléticas

con alas, llamadas Thestrals, que tienen apariencia de caballos, pero que

decididamente no son caballos. Los Thestrals parecieran ser una combinación

extraña entre dragón y caballo, y sólo aquellos que presenciaron una muerte

pueden verlos.

Como Harry vio la muerte de Cedric, por primera vez puede ver que son

Thestrals los que tiran de los carros que los llevan a Hogwarts. Luna Lovegood,

cuando era niña vio morir a su madre. Ella también puede ver a los Thestrals, y

piensa que son criaturas gentiles y amistosas.

Aunque los Thestrals fueron creados con efectos visuales, Dudman y su

equipo construyeron una maqueta del tamaño que tendrían naturalmente, para

que los cineastas pudieran visualizarlos en el entorno en el que estaban filmando.

-“Es muy fácil decir que un Thestral tiene alas de 30 pies de ancho”- explica el

experto en efectos especiales- pero ¿qué quiere decir eso en verdad? ¿Va a caber

en el escenario? ¿Y cómo se vé con respecto a los actores? Además, como los

Thestrals son negros y se ven por las noches, discutimos mucho sobre cuál sería

su textura y cuál sería el esquema de negro sobre negro que utilizaríamos”.

Aunque solo son visibles para Harry y para Luna, los Thestrals fueron

muy importantes para transportar el Ejército de Dumbledore a su primera

batalla, en donde se pone a prueba su coraje, y todo su nuevo arsenal de

encantamientos recientemente aprendidos.

LUCHA EN EL FRENTE

Si bien Harry ahora se siente muy confiado en su nuevo papel de líder y

en su abierto desafío a la profesora Umbridge y sus enseñanzas, todavía lo

persiguen sus pesadillas. Aún peor, ahora pareciera que sus pesadillas predijeran

 

 

verdaderos eventos. Dumbledore está preocupado, porque más y más se va

dando cuenta que las pesadillas de Harry no son sueños en absoluto, sino más

bien Voldemort intentando utilizar la mente de Harry en contra del muchacho

mismo. Dumbledore pide al profesor Snape que le enseñe a Harry el arte de la

Oclumancia, el cual le permitirá a Harry bloquear al Señor Tenebroso infiltrar su

mente. El aprendizaje es extenuante y revelador, lo cual ni Harry ni Snape se lo

esperaban, pero no es en vano. Los juegos mentales de Voldemort resultan ser

demasiado fuertes para el joven mago.

Harry se despierta de una terrible pesadilla en la cual él vé que Sirius es

atacado detrás de una puerta, la cual él recuerda haber visto cuando fue a su

audiencia ante el Ministerio de la Magia. Harry sabe que existe la posibilidad de

que la pesadilla sea una trampa para llevarlo al Ministerio, pero él no puede

dejar de ir. Sirius es la única familia que le queda.

Sin embargo, Harry no va a ir solo. Pese a sus protestas iniciales cinco

valientes miembros del Ejército de Dumbledore se unirán a él: Hermione, Ron,

Neville, Luna, y la Hermana menor de Weasley, Ginny. Si Harry quiere arriesgar

todo para salvar a Sirius, todos van a tomar el mismo riesgo y van a luchar con

él.

Al llegar al Departamento de Misterios en el Ministerio de la Magia, los

seis jóvenes magos irán hasta la Sala de las Profecías: un lugar que parece

infinito, lleno de profecías envasadas en esferas de cristal, catalogadas y

archivadas en interminables filas de estantes. Stuart Craig dice que el plan

original era: -“físicamente construir 15 mil esferas de cristal y ponerlas en

estantes de vidrio. Todo junto iba a parecer un palacio de cristal cubierto de

telarañas y polvo. Pero después nos dimos cuenta que, cuando los estantes se

rompieran íbamos a poder hacer solamente una toma. Luego, tomaría semanas

reemplazar las esferas y armar el set para poder repetir la toma”. Hubo que optar

por lo práctico, y la escena se filmó contra un fondo verde. Así, la Sala de las

 

 

Profecías pasó a ser el primer set totalmente creado por computadora en una

película de Harry Potter.

Harry inmediatamente se da cuenta de que él ya había estado en la Sala de

las Profecías antes, pero al ir pasando por las filas de estantes numerados, es

Neville quien descubre algo asombroso: La etiqueta de una de las esferas de

cristal dice Harry Potter.

Sin saber que la profecía es la clave de la conexión entre él y Lord

Voldemort, Harry toma la esfera en sus manos… y la trampa se abre. Los magos

adolescentes son rodeados por un grupo de Mortífagos, liderados por el pérfido

Lucius Malfoy. Jason Isaacs vuelve a interpretar el papel de Lucius, y dice: -“En

ese momento, la máscara de civilidad de Lucius se cae para siempre. Los frentes

de batalla quedan definidos, y ya no tiene nada que fingir, ahora saben para qué

lado pelea”.

Uno de los aliados de Lucius, es la sádica prima de Sirius, Bellatrix

Lestrange. Quien recientemente se escapó de la Prisión Azkaban. Ella es una

secuaz del Señor Tenebroso. Fue Bellatrix quien hizo el encantamiento Cruciatus

a los padres de Neville, y los torturó hasta la locura: algo que Sirius dice que es

“peor que la muerte misma”. Su presencia da a Neville una muy buena razón

para estar allí. Matthew Lewis, el actor que dio vida a Neville en todas las

películas de Harry Potter, comenta: -“Neville resulta ser mucho más valiente de

lo que uno piensa. Llevó al personaje desde el punto de ser un niño, de quien

uno nunca pensaría que podría pelear, mucho menos contra los Mortífagos, a ser

un hombre que pelea para vengar a sus padres… ¡fue increíble!”

Helena Bonham Carter también se une al grupo de actores de Harry Potter

por primera vez, y dice que le fascinó poder hacer el papel de la diabólica

Bellatrix Lestrange. -“Si a uno le preguntan si quiere estar en una película de

Harry Potter tiene que decir que sí. Para mí fue muy divertido hacer este papel.

Sin duda alguna, Bellatrix tiene problemas de personalidad”- dice riendo la

actriz -“Es más, creo que a ella le gusta ser mala. Me parece que está enamorada

 

 

de Lord Voldemort; ya que quiso ir a prisión en su lugar durante 14 años. Pero

ahora salió de allí, y se volvió todavía más fanática”.

Los seis jóvenes magos pelean con mucha valentía, utilizando sus varitas

mágicas para hacer encantamientos que en su mayoría, recién aprendieron. Pese

a todo, no son suficientemente buenos contendientes para los muy

experimentados Mortífagos. Justo cuando los muchachos están al borde de la

muerte, llegan los miembros de la Orden del Fénix, con Sirius Black liderándolos,

y ordenándole a Malfoy, “¡Aléjate de mi ahijado!”.

Se desata la batalla, y Sirius parece disfrutar el momento, tal vez por el

peligro que conlleva. Gary Oldman relata: -“Sirius está muy frustrado, primero

por haber estado en prisión durante 12 años, y tras ello, por haber estado

escondido en Grimmauld Place. El había estado muy ansioso para comenzar a

hacer algo, y ahora que volvió es el momento. Como en los viejos tiempos”.

Michael Goldenberg cuenta que escribir el guión para el enfrentamiento

crucial entre la Orden del Fénix y los Mortífagos fue uno de sus trabajos más

difíciles. –“Intentar capturar la esencia de lo que decía el libro, y darle forma

para la pantalla, necesitó hacer mucho equilibrio. Queríamos asegurarnos que la

escena transmitía una verdadera sensación de peligro, el sentimiento de que

cualquier cosa podía suceder, y que cualquiera de ellos podía vivir o morir en un

instante. Eso es lo que logra que la gente quede petrificada de suspenso en sus

asientos”.

Para la coreografía de las batallas, David Yates contó con el arte de Paul

Harris, quien le dio al combate de varitas mágicas movimientos parecidos a la

esgrima. -“David quería que yo pusiera reglas a la pelea con varitas mágicas, lo

cual no había sido establecido en las otras películas” – explica Harris -“El quería

que los encantamientos tuvieran que tener determinado movimiento o posición

para que sucedieran, y al mismo tiempo, debían ser únicos del mundo de Harry

Potter”.

 

 

Además de definir los movimientos básicos a realizar, Harris trabajó con

cada uno de los actores para desarrollar sus técnicas individuales. El explica: “

Jason Isaacs por ejemplo, es puro estilo, muy formal, mientras que el estilo de

Gary Oldman es más ‘callejero’ si se quiere, lo que va más de acuerdo con la

personalidad de su personaje”.

A través de la batalla, hay triunfos y tragedias, las cuales llegan a su

clímax en el enfrentamiento entre Albus Dumbledore y Lord Voldemort. Yates

comenta: -“La pelea entre Voldemort y Dumbledore necesitaba ser épica y

visceral. La intención era que el público se sintiera dentro de la batalla, que la

experimentara como estando allí mismo, por eso, cada vez que fue posible,

usamos cámara en mano para filmar”.

Tim Burke, el supervisor de efectos especiales, agrega que, dado que se

trataba de una gran batalla entre dos magos muy poderosos: - “David Yates tuvo

la brillante idea de basar todo en elementos: agua, fuego, arena… lo cual tuvo

sentido y al mismo tiempo fue asombroso”.

El director aclara: - “En última instancia, esta gran pelea entre

Dumbledore y Voldemort que uno vé, es el momento cumbre, resultado de las

primeras cinco historias anteriores. Era nuestro deber hacer de ella la batalla más

espectacular entre el bien y el mal, y poner a Harry en el centro”.

-“En realidad, la verdadera razón por la que están peleando, es el alma de

Harry” - afirma David Heyman - “en medio de todo ello, Harry, que al principio

de la historia se sentía rechazado y profundamente solo, aún estando entre

amigos, finalmente logra ver que, esa gente es el regalo más preciado e

irremplazable que la vida le dio”.

Daniel Radcliffe dice: -“Harry sabe que Voldemort es poderoso y tiene

muchos seguidores, pero en última instancia nunca va a tener lo que Harry tiene,

y eso es la lealtad verdadera e incondicional de sus amigos”.

Heyman agrega: -“Además, Harry tiene algo que su madre y sus amigos

le dieron, y que Voldemort nunca tendrá: el regalo del amor”.

 

 

Yates finaliza diciendo: -“‘

‘‘H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx’

’’

trata de temas exigentes y complejos, pero creo que entre ellos el más

contundente es el poder de la amistad y la lealtad”.

SOBRE LOS ACTORES

DANIEL RADCLIFFE es conocido por su actuación como el niño mago

Harry Potter en todas las películas basadas en los libros súper ventas de J.K.

Rowling.

Al principio de este año, Radcliffe actuó en teatro por primera vez en su

carrera, interpretando a Alan Strang en la obra premiada de Peter Shaffer,

“Equus”. La obra, que no había sido ofrecida en Londres por más de 30 años,

estuvo dirigida por Thea Sharrock. En ella era co-protagonista el actor ganador

del Premio Tony, Richard Griffiths.

Próximamente se lo podrá ver a Radcliffe en la película independiente

australiana “December Boys”, dirigida por Rod Hardy, y que se estrenará en

Septiembre del 2007.

Durante el verano, Radcliffe estará filmando el drama “My Boy Jack”,

escrito y dirigido por David Haig, para el canal británico ITV. La película relata

la historia de Jack, el hijo de 17 años de Rudyard Kipling, que nunca volvió de la

Primera Guerra Mundial. Allí actúa también Kim Cattrall y Carey Mulligan, bajo

la dirección de Brian Kirk.

El año pasado Radcliffe fue estrella invitada en un episodio de la serie

“Extras”, de la cadena HBO, protagonizada por Ricky Gervais.

RUPERT GRINT vuelve a retomar su papel como el mejor amigo de

Harry Potter, Ron Weasley, personaje que interpretó en todas las películas de

Harry Potter.

 

 

Grint debutó profesionalmente como actor en “Harry Potter and the

Sorcerer’s Stone”. Su trabajo le valió grandes loas, y fue postulado para el premio

del Círculo de Críticos Británicos de Cine como Actor Revelación y al premio

Joven Artista al Actor Revelación Más Prometedor. Además, la principal revista

británica de cine, “Empire”, otorgó recientemente a Grint y a sus compañeros coprotagonistas

de Harry Potter, Daniel Radcliffe y Emma Watson, el prestigioso

Premio a la Contribución Sobresaliente, en reconocimiento a su trabajo en todas

las películas de Harry Potter.

Luego de su actuación en la primera película de Harry Potter, Grint

interpretó el papel principal de un profesor loco, en la película de Peter Hewitt,

“Thunderpants”, junto a Simon Callow, Stephen Fry y Paul Giamatti. Tras ello,

volvió a su papel de Ron Weasley, en “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”,

“Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y “Harry Potter and the Goblet of

Fire”. En el año 2006, Grint apareció junto a Julie Walters y Laura Linney en la

aclamada película independiente de Jeremy Brock, “Driving Lessons”.

Antes de ganar el papel de Ron Weasley, Grint ya había actuado en obras

teatrales de su escuela y en teatros de barrio, entre s producciones como “Annie”,

“Peter Pan” y “Rumpelstiltskin”.

Cuando no está filmando, es muy común encontrar a Grint jugando en las

canchas de golf.

EMMA WATSON retoma el papel de Hermione Granger, la estudiosa y

vieja amiga de Harry Potter y Ron Weasley.

Su papel en la primera película “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”,

fue su debut en el mundo de la actuación profesional y le valió ganar el Premio

Joven Artista en la categoría Mejor Joven Artista Principal. Su papel de

Hermione le ha creado muchos seguidores a través del mundo, y también le hizo

ganar el prestigioso premio AOL a la Mejor Actriz Secundaria, por “Harry Potter

and the Chamber of Secrets” y “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”.

 

 

Watson fue dos veces candidata al premio Critics’ Choice otorgado por la

Asociación de Críticos de Películas para Televisión, por su actuación en “Harry

Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Además, los lectores de la revista “Total Film” la votaron Mejor Nueva Actriz por

su trabajo en “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”. Más recientemente

Watson fue reconocida por la revista británica líder sobre cine, “Empire”, junto

con sus co-protagonistas Daniel Radcliffe y Rupert Grint, con el prestigioso

Premio Contribución Sobresaliente, en reconocimiento a su trabajo en las

películas de Harry Potter.

Watson continúa dividiendo su tiempo entre sus estudios y filmaciones, a

la vez de ser una floreciente atleta. Algunos de sus hobbies son viajar, bailar y

cantar.

HELENA BONHAM CARTER se suma al reparto de “Harry Potter and

the Order of the Phoenix” como el personaje que es la sobrina de Sirius Black, la

Mortífaga Bellatrix Lestrange.

Bonham Carter ha prestado su talento a una extensa colección

heterogénea de largometrajes, televisión y obras de teatro, tanto en los Estados

Unidos como en su nativa Inglaterra. Más tarde este mismo año, podrá vérsela

en el papel de Mrs. Lovett, en la adaptación para cine, del musical de Stephen

Sondheim, “Sweeney Todd”, dirigido por Tim Burton. Su co-protagonista será

Johnny Depp en el papel del personaje del título.

Previamente ella ya había sido co-protagonista junto a Depp, en la exitosa

película para la familia “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”, también dirigida

por Burton.

En 1997, por su actuación en la película de drama y romance “The Wings

of the Dove”, Bonham Carter recibió nominaciones a los Premios de la

Academia, a los Globos de Oro y al que otorga el Gremio de Actores de Cine. Su

actuación en dicho film también le brindó premios a La Mejor Actriz de parte de

 

 

varias organizaciones de críticos de cine, entre ella la de los Críticos de Cine de

Los Ángeles, la Broadcast Film Critics, la Junta Nacional de Críticos y el Círculo

de Críticos de Cine de Londres.

Bonham Carter debutó prometedoramente en cine, con el papel principal

en la película biográfica/histórica “Lady Jane”. Ni bien terminó de filmarla, el

director James Ivory le ofreció el papel principal en “A Room With a View”, la

cual se basa en el libro de E.M. Forster. Tras ellos, recibió loas con la actuación de

otras dos adaptaciones de novelas de Forster: “Where Angels Fear to Tread” del

director Charles Sturridge y “Howard’s End” de James Ivory’s, con la cual fue

postulada por primera vez para el premio de la Academia Británica de Artes de

Cine y Televisión (BAFTA).

Entre las primeras películas que interpretó la actriz, se encuentran:

“Hamlet” de Franco Zeffirelli, junto a Mel Gibson; “Mary Shelley’s

Frankenstein”, dirigida y actuada por Kenneth Branagh; “Mighty Aphrodite” de

Woody Allen; y “Twelfth Night”, en la que volvió a actuar con Trevor Nunn.

Más tarde actuó en la película de David Fincher, “Fight Club”, junto a Brad Pitt y

a Edward Norton; en el drama “Big Fish” y la película de ciencia-ficción “Planet

of the Apes”, ambas del director Tim Burton. También actuó en películas como

“Carnivale”, “Novocaine”, “The Heart of Me”, y “Till Human Voices Wake Us”.

En el año 2005, Bonham Carter prestó su voz a dos películas animadas: la

de Tim Burton “Corpse Bride”, en el papel principal; y la ganadora del Oscar

“Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit”. Ese mismo año

protagonizó el film independiente de acción “Conversations with Other

Women”, junto con Aaron Eckhart.

El trabajo de Bonham Carter en televisión, le valió nominaciones al Emmy

y al Globo de Oro, por el telefilm “Live From Baghdad” y la miniserie “Merlin”,

y otra candidatura al Globo de Oro, por su interpretación de Marina Oswald, en

la miniserie “Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald”. La actriz también

encarnó a Anna Bolena en la miniserie británica “Henry VIII”, y a la madre de

 

 

siete niños – cuatro de ellos autistas- en el telefilm del canal BBC, “Magnificent

7”.

Entre las obras teatrales en las que actuó Bonham Carter, cabe mencionar

“Woman in White”, “The Chalk Garden”, “House of Bernarda Alba” y

“Trelawny of the Wells”, entre muchas otras.

ROBBIE COLTRANE vuelve a tomar su papel de Rubeus Hagrid,

cuidador del entorno de Hogwarts, y en parte también maestro.

Coltrane es uno de los actores más respetados y prolíficos del cine y la

televisión británicos, y ha sido postulado al premio de la Academia Británica de

Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) y al del Círculo de Críticos de Cine de Los

Ángeles, por su actuación como Hagrid en “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s

Stone”. Volvió a retomar el mismo papel en “Harry Potter and the Chamber of

Secrets”, “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y en “Harry Potter and the

Goblet of Fire”.

Entre la larga lista de trabajos que realizó en cine, cabe mencionar las

películas: “Alex Rider: Operation Stormbreaker”; “Provoked: A True Story”;

“Ocean’s Twelve” de Steven Soderbergh; “Van Helsing”; “From Hell” de los

hermanos Hughes, en donde actuó junto a Johnny Depp; las películas de James

Bond “The World is Not Enough” y “Goldeneye”; “The Adventures of

Huckleberry Finn” de Stephen Sommers; “Message in a Bottle” de Luis Mandoki;

“Buddy”; “The Pope Must Die”; “Nuns on the Run”, por la cual ganó el Premio

Peter Sellers de Comedia en 1991 en la entrega de Premios Evening Standard de

cine inglés; “Henry V” de Kenneth Branagh; “Let It Ride”; “Bert Rigby, You’re a

Fool” de Carl Reiner; “Mona Lisa” de Neil Jordan; “Absolute Beginners”; y

“Defense of the Realm”, entre muchas otras.

Coltrane es reconocido internacionalmente por su personaje en la

premiada serie televisiva “Cracker”, la cual fue el inicio de varias otras películas

para televisión. La más reciente de ellas, se transmitió en el otoño del 2006. Su

 

 

interpretación del duro y gracioso psicólogo de la policía, Dr. Eddie “Fitz”

Fitzgerald, le valió varios honores por su actuación, entre ellos tres premios

consecutivos de la BAFTA al Mejor Actor de Televisión en 1994, 1995 y 1996; el

Premio al Mejor Actor de Televisión del Gremio de Periodistas de Televisión en

1993; el Premio Ninfa de Plata al Mejor Actor, en el Festival de Televisión de

Montecarlo 1994; el premio al Mejor Actor de la Sociedad Real de Televisión en

1994; también ganó el Premio FIPA (Festival Internacional de Programas

Audiovisuales, Cannes) al Mejor Actor y el Premio Cable Ace al Mejor Actor de

Mejor Película o Mini Serie.

Al principio de los años 80, Coltrane se lanzó como artista cómico, y se lo

vio actuar en espectáculos como “Alfresco”, “Kick Up the Eighties”, “Laugh??? I

Nearly Paid My Licence Fee” y “Saturday Night Live”. Luego tuvo apariciones

estelares en 13 producciones “Comic Strip” y numerosos shows televisivos, como

“Blackadder the Third” y “Blackadder’s Christmas Carol”. Fue nominado para el

Premio BAFTA al Mejor Actor por su actuación como Danny McGlone, en la

serie “Tutti Frutti”. Entre los trabajos más recientes de Coltrane en televisión,

están los telefilms “The Ebb-Tide”, “Alice in Wonderland” y “The Planman”, este

último en el cual él también fue productor ejecutivo. El fue también artista

invitado en el último episodio de la serie “Frasier”.

Coltrane fue parte de la Lista de Honor de Año Nuevo 2006, de la Orden

del Imperio Británico (OBE) por sus servicios a las Artes Dramáticas.

WARWICK DAVIS vuelve a ser el profesor Filius Flitwick, papel que ya

había desempeñado en todas las películas de Harry Potter anteriores.

Hace poco, Davis apareció en televisión, en un episodio de la popular

serie del canal a HBO, “Extras”, escrita y protagonizada por Ricky Gervais, y en

la cual actuaban tanto Davis como Daniel Radcliffe. Otros de sus trabajos que

merecen destacarse se vieron en: “The Chronicles of Narnia”; “Murder Rooms”;

la película de Steve Cogan, homenaje a los filmes de la casa productora inglesa

 

 

Hammer Horror, “Dr. Terrible’s House of Horrible”; “Carrie & Barry”; “The

Fitz”; “Gulliver’s Travels”; “The 10th Kingdom”; y “Snow White: The Fairest of

Them All”.

Davis es un experto actor teatral en Inglaterra, y trabajó en diversas

producciones de “Snow White”, “Peter Pan” y “Aladdin”.

Sin embargo, es posible que Davis sea más reconocido por sus apariciones

en el cine. Su carrera comenzó con el papel de Wicket en la película de “Star

Wars: Return of the Jedi”, a la cual llegó a ofrecerse para actuar, luego de que su

abuela escuchara una llamada para actores bajitos por la radio. Tras ello actuó en

el film “Labyrinth”, a lo que siguió la internacionalmente exitosa aventura

“Willow”, en la cual interpretó el papel principal; escrito especialmente para él.

Recientemente, en la aclamada película biográfica “Ray”, Davis hizo las

veces de Oberon, el maestro del club de jazz que vio la primera actuación de Ray

Charles. Entre sus muchos trabajos, cabe destacar las películas: “Leprechaun” y

sus cinco secuelas, “Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace”, “A Very

Unlucky Leprechaun”, “The White Pony”, “The New Adventures of Pinocchio”

y “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”.

En este momento Davis está filmando “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince

Caspian”, la secuela de la muy exitosa “The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe”.

RALPH FIENNES, una vez más vuelve a darle vida al pérfido Lord

Voldemort, uno de los más horrorosos malos de la literatura moderna. El actor

interpretó por primera vez al personaje en el año 2005, en “Harry Potter and the

Goblet of Fire”.

Fiennes protagonizó seis películas que se estrenaron en el 2005, entre ellas

“The Constant Gardener” de Fernando Meirelles, con la cual ganó el Premio al

Cine Británico Independiente, el Premio Evening Standard al cine Británico y el

Premio del Círculo de Críticos de Cine de Londres. Por esa misma película fue

 

 

postulado al premio de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión

(BAFTA). Otras películas en las que actuó que se estrenaron ese mismo año,

fueron: “The White Countess” de James Ivory, “The Chumscrubber”,

“Chromophobia” de Martha Fiennes y la película animada premiada con el

Oscar, “Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit”.

Fiennes fue dos veces candidato al Premio de la Academia, la primera en

1994, por su actuación en la película de Steven Spielberg, ganadora del Oscar a la

Mejor Película, “Schindler’s List”. Su escalofriante retrato del Comandante Nazi,

Amon Goeth también le valió la candidatura a los Globos de Oro, el premio de la

BAFTA, y varios galardones como Mejor Actor Secundario, de parte de varios

grupos de críticos de cine, entre ellos: la Sociedad Nacional de Críticos de Cine, y

el de los Críticos de Cine de Nueva York, Chicago, Boston y los Críticos de

Londres. Fiennes fue propuesto para el Oscar por segunda vez en 1997, por su

trabajo en otra película ganadora del premio a la Mejor Película, “The English

Patient” de Anthony Minghella. El actor fue nominado también a los premios

Globo de Oro, y al de la BAFTA, y también a dos otros premios otorgados por el

Gremio de Actores de cine (SAG) al Mejor Actor, y otro compartido con el resto

del reparto.

Fiennes recientemente terminó la filmación de la película aún por

estrenarse, “In Bruges”. Los siguientes son algunos de sus múltiples trabajos:

“Red Dragon”; “The End of the Affair” y “The Good Thief”, ambas de Neil

Jordan; “Spider” de David Cronenberg; “Onegin” de Martha Fiennes, película en

la cual él también fue productor ejecutivo; “Sunshine” de Istvan Szabo; “Maid in

Manhattan”, en donde actuó junto a Jennifer Lopez; el musical animado “The

Prince of Egypt”; “The Avengers”; “Oscar and Lucinda”; “Strange Days”; “Quiz

Show” de Robert Redford; y “Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights”, película con la

cual debutó en el cine.

Tras graduarse de la Academia Real de Artes Dramáticas, Fiennes

comenzó a trabajar en teatros de Londres. El actor se unió a la compañía teatral

 

 

de Michael Rudman, en el Teatro Royal National, y más tarde trabajó dos años

con la Compañía Royal Shakespeare (RSC). En 1994, Fiennes fue Hamlet en la

producción de Jonathan Kent de la obra. Más tarde ganó un Premio Tony por su

actuación cuando la producción pasó a los teatros de Broadway. Luego se reunió

con Kent para la producción en Londres de “Ivanov”, la cual posteriormente fue

llevada a Moscú. En el año 2000, Fiennes volvió a los escenarios de Londres para

actuar en los papeles principales en las obras “Richard II” y “Coriolanus”. En el

2002, actuó por primera vez el papel de Carl Jung en la obra “The Talking Cure”

de Christopher Hampton, la cual se ofreció en el teatro Nacional Real. Al año

siguiente, interpretó el papel protagonista en la obra de Ibsen, “Brand” con la

RSC. En 2005, Fiennes fue el primer actor en la producción de Deborah Warner

de “Julius Caesar”. Hace poco tiempo, Fiennes volvió a trabajar con el director

Jonathan Kent, en “Faith Healer” de Brian Friels, obra que se ofreció en el Teatro

Gate de Dublin antes de pasar a los escenarios de Broadway. Fiennes fue listado

para los premios Tony por su actuación en dicha obra.

MICHAEL GAMBON vuelve a tomar su papel de Albus Dumbledore, el

muy sabio y respetado director de la escuela Hogwarts. Ya lo había hecho en

“Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y en “Harry Potter and the Goblet of

Fire”.

Gambon ha sido galardonado por su trabajo en el escenario, en cine y

televisión en el curso de su carrera, la cual se extiende a lo largo de cuatro

décadas. Compartió los premios de Gremio de Actores de Cine (SAG) y el Critics

Choice como parte del grupo de actores de “Gosford Park” de Robert Altman.

También ganó cuatro Premios Televisivos de la Academia Británica de Artes de

Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) por su actuación en los telefilms “Perfect Strangers”;

“Longitude”; “Wives and Daughters” – por el cual también ganó el Premio de la

Sociedad Real de Televisión (RTS) - y “The Singing Detective”. Por este último

también ganó el Premio RTS y el del Gremio de Periodistas de Televisión, por su

 

 

trabajo en el papel protagónico. Gambon también fue nominado a los premios

Emmy y Globo de Oro, por su interpretación como el Presidente Lyndon Baines

Jonson, en la película del canal HBO, “The Path to War”. En 1998, fue nombrado

caballero por la Reina Isabel II por sus servicios al teatro.

Hace muy poco, Gambon actuó en el filme de Jake Paltrow, “The Good

Night”, que tuvo su première en el Festival de Cine de Sundance 2007, y en el

drama de Robert De Niro “The Good Shepherd”, donde también actuaron Matt

Damon y Angelina Jolie. Próximamente se lo verá en “Brideshead Revisited” y

en “My Boy”.

Gambon nació en Irlanda, y comenzó su carrera en el teatro Edwards-

MacLiammoir Gate de Dublin. En 1963, fue uno de los miembros originales de la

Compañía Teatral Nacional de teatro Old Vic bajo la dirección de Laurence

Olivier. Más tarde su unió a la compañía repertorio Birmingham, con quienes

interpretó “Othello”. El extenso repertorio teatral en que actuó incluye varias

producciones en teatros del West End de Londres. Entre esas obras se destacan:

“Otherwise Engaged” de Simon Gray; las premières en Londres de tres obras de

Alan Ayckbourn: “The Norman Conquests”, “Just Between Ourselves” y “Man

of the Moment”; “Alice’s Boys”; “Old Times” de Harold Pinter; “Uncle Vanya”

en la cual interpretó el papel principal; y “Veterans Day” con Jack Lemmon,

siendo estas sólo algunas. En 1987, ganó muchos premios, entre ellos el Olivier al

Mejor Actor, por su trabajo en el re-estreno de la obra de Arthur Millar, “A View

From the Bridge”.

Actuando en el Teatro Royal National (RNT), Gambon desarrolló papeles

principales en las obras: “Betrayal” y “Mountain Language” de Harold Pinter;

“Close of Play” de Simon Gray; “Tales from Hollywood” de Christopher

Hampton; otras tres obras de Alan Ayckbourn, “Sisterly Feelings”, “A Chorus of

Disapproval” –por la cual ganó el Premio Olivier- y “A Small Family Business”;

y “Skylight” de David Hare, la cual luego se ofreció en teatros del West End y en

Broadway. Junto con la compañía teatral de RNT, Gambon interpretó

 

 

“Endgame”, con Lee Evans, y fue Falstaff en la obra “Henry IV, Parts I and II”.

Su trabajo más reciente en teatro fue un rol principal en “Volpone”, por el cual

ganó un premio Evening Standard; la producción de “Cressida” de Nicholas

Hytner, en el teatro Almeida; la producción de Patrick Marber de “Caretaker”, en

el West End; y la producción de Stephen Daldry de “A Number” en el teatro The

Royal Court.

Entre los muchos trabajos de Gambon en cine están: la nueva versión de

“The Omen”, “The Life Aquatic” de Wes Anderson, “Sky Captain and the World

of Tomorrow”, “Sylvia”, “Open Range”, “The Insider”, Tim Burton’s “Sleepy

Hollow”, “The Last September”, “Dancing at Lughnasa”, “The Gambler”, “The

Wings of the Dove” y “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover”. El actor

también trabajó el la muy premiada miniserie del canal HBO “Angels in

America”, dirigida por Mike Nichols.

BRENDAN GLEESON vuelve a interpretar a Alistor ‘Ojoloco’ Moody,

papel que ya había interpretado en “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Gleeson trabajó en más de 40 películas desde que debutó en el cine con el

filme de Jim Sheridan, “The Field”. Tuvo pequeños papeles en películas como

“Into the West” de Mike Newell, y en la de Ron Howard, “Far and Away”.

Luego le llegó el papel de Hamish, en la película de Mel Gibson ganadora del

Oscar a la Mejor Película, “Braveheart”. A eso le siguieron las películas de Neil

Jordan “Michael Collins” y “The Butcher Boy”. También actuó en la película

independiente “Angela Mooney”, en la cual fue John Boorman productor

ejecutivo.

En 1998, Boorman dirigió a Gleeson en el papel del héroe folklórico

irlandés de la vida real, Martin Cahill, en la aclamada película histórica “The

General”. Por su actuación en ella, Gleeson recibió varios honores a la actuación,

entre ellos, el Premio al Mejor Actor otorgado por el Círculos de Críticos de Cine

de Londres. Desde entonces, trabajó en las películas de John Boorman “The

 

 

Tailor of Panama”, “In My Country” y “The Tiger’s Tail”.

Entre los muchos otros trabajos de Gleeson están: “Mission: Impossible II”

de John Woo, “Harrison’s Flowers”, “Wild About Harry”, “Artificial Intelligence:

A.I.” de Steven Spielberg, “28 Days Later…” de Danny Boyle, “Gangs of New

York” de Martin Scorsese, “Cold Mountain” de Anthony Minghella, “Troy” de

Wolfgang Petersen, “The Village” de M. Night Shyamalan, “Kingdom of

Heaven” de Ridley Scott, “Breakfast on Pluto” de Neil Jordan, y “Black Irish”.

En este momento Gleeson presta su voz para la película animada

“Beowulf”, dirigida por Robert Zemeckis, y que se estrenará en Noviembre del

2007.

Próximamente se lo podrá ver en los filmes “In Bruges”, en donde son coprotagonistas

Colin Farrell y Ralph Fiennes, bajo la dirección de Martin

McDonagh. En la pantalla chica, actuará el papel principal del estadista en

“Churchill at War”, del director Thaddeus O’Sullivan, la cual será emitida por el

canal HBO.

Gleeson nació en Irlanda, donde comenzó a trabajar como maestro. Pero

luego cambió de carrera y se unió a la compañía teatral irlandesa Passion

Machine. Entre sus trabajos en los escenarios, cabe mencionar las producciones

“King of the Castle”, “The Plough and the Stars”, “Prayers of Sherkin”, “The

Cherry Orchard”, y “Juno and the Paycock”, en el teatro Gaiety, esta última la

cual fue también presentada en el Festival Teatral de Chicago. En 2001, Gleeson

volvió al escenario del Teatro Peacock de Dublin con la obra de Billy Roche, “On

Such As We”, dirigida por Wilson Milam.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS vuelve a aparecer como el tío de Harry, Vernon

Dursley, que es un Muggle. Previamente, él ya había actuado en “Harry Potter

and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” y “Harry

Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”.

 

 

Recientemente Griffiths actuó junto a Daniel Radcliffe en teatros del West

End, en el re-estreno de Peter Shaffer de la obra “Equus”. El año pasado, Griffiths

fue postulado al premio Mejor Actor de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y

Televisión (BAFTA), por su actuación como Héctor en la adaptación para cine de

“The History Boys” de Nicholas Hytner. El actor interpretó al personaje por

primera vez, en la producción en el Teatro Nacional Hytner de Londres. Por ello,

ganó el Premio Olivier al Mejor Actor. Griffiths actuó su papel en giras por

teatros regionales e internacionales, y también en Broadway, en donde ganó el

Premio Tony al Mejor Actor Principal en una Obra Teatral.

Entre los muchos trabajos de Griffiths se encuentran: “Venus” de Roger

Michell, “Stage Beauty” de Richard Eyre, “Vatel” de Roland Joffe, “Sleepy

Hollow” de Tim Burton, “Funny Bones” de Peter Chelsom, “Guarding Tess”,

“Blame It on the Bellboy”, “The Naked Gun 2½”, “King Ralph”, “Withnail & I”,

“A Private Function”, “Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan” de Hugh Hudson,

“Gorky Park” de Michael Apted, “Gandhi” de Richard Attenborough, “Ragtime”

de Milos Forman, “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” de Karel Reisz y la película

ganadora del Oscar de Hugh Hudson “Chariots of Fire”.

En la televisión inglesa tal vez Griffiths sea reconocido por las series del

canal BBC “Pie in the Sky” y “Hope & Glory”. Otros de sus trabajos notables en

televisión fueron diversos papeles en: “Bleak House”, “The Brides in the Bath”,

“Gormenghast”, “In the Red”, “Ted & Ralph”, “Inspector Morse”, “Mr.

Wakefield’s Crusade”, “Goldeneye: The Secret Life of Ian Fleming”, “The

Marksman”, “Casanova”, “The Cleopatras”, “Bird of Prey” y la serie “Nobody’s

Perfect”.

Griffiths es un logrado actor teatral que recientemente actuó en la

producción de “Heroes”en el West End de Londres. El actor, también trabajó con

la Compañía Royal Shakespeare en las obras “The White Guard”, “Once in a

Lifetime”, “Henry VIII”, “Volpone”, y “Red Star”. Entre los trabajos teatrales

más importantes del actor, cabe mencionar las producciones de la obras

 

 

“Luther”, “Heartbreak House”, “Galileo”, “Rules of the Game”, “Art”,

“Katherine Howard” y “The Man Who Came to Dinner”.

JASON ISAACS retoma su papel del Mortífago Lucius Malfoy, que

interpretó primero en la segunda película de Harry Potter film, “Harry Potter

and the Chamber of Secrets”. Volvió a actuar en el mismo papel en “Harry Potter

and the Goblet of Fire”. Isaacs recientemente actuó junto a Catherine Keener,

Jennifer Aniston, Joan Cusack y Frances McDormand, en la comedia “Friends

with Money”, que se pasó por primera vez en el Festival de Cine de Sundance

2006.

En el otoño del 2006, Isaacs actuó en tres prestigiosas películas, con

personajes muy diferentes. Para la cadena BBC, realizó una serie de suspenso en

seis partes, “The State Within”, en donde interpretaba a Sir Mark Brydon, el

embajador británico asediado en Washington DC. Luego fue el arrasador éxito

del canal Showtime, la serie “Brotherhood”, en la cual Isaacs interpretaba al

gángster irlandés- americano, Michael Caffee. Finalmente actuó en el telefilm

“Scars” del Canal 4 inglés, escrito y dirigido por Leo Regan, en él hacía el papel

de un peligroso llamado Chris. Dicha película trata de la causa y efecto de la

violencia a través de un monólogo virtual, compuesto de copias de entrevistas.

El año anterior, interpretó papeles tan distintos como: un desconsolado

romántico en la premiada película de Rodrigo Garcia “Nine Lives”, en la cual

también actuaba Robin Wright Penn, y el arrabalero papá reprimido en“The

Chumscrubber”. Ambas películas fueron estrenadas mundialmente en el Festival

de Cine de Sundance 2005. Luego encarnó al sexista y homofóbico galán de cine

en la cómica película independiente de Donal Logue, “Tennis Anyone?”; y en

televisión on televisión, dio vida al cínico periodista gráfico repetidamente en la

serie del canal NBC, “The West Wing”.

Isaacs ha estado trabajando sin parar desde el año 2000, cuando interpretó

al cruel Coronel William Tavington en “The Patriot”, donde también actuaba Mel

 

 

Gibson. Isaac robó lo pantalla en el filme y eso le valió ser postulado al premio

del Círculo de Críticos de Londres al Mejor Actor Secundario. Al año siguiente,

se lo vio a Isaacs envuelto en lentejuelas en un traje sin breteles, en una nueva

versión del drama romántico “Sweet November”, con Keanu Reeves y Charlize

Theron. Luego, estuvo casi irreconocible como el Capt. Mike Steele de cabeza de

bala, en el aclamado drama de la guerra de Ridley Scott, “Black Hawk Down”.

Más tarde Isaacs actuó en: el drama sobre la Segunda Guerra Mundial de John

Woo, “Windtalkers”, con Nicolas Cage; en la semidulce comedia romántica

“Passionada”; y en la comedia película de acción “The Tuxedo”, con Jackie Chan.

En el año 2003, Isaacs realizó dos papeles en la película “Peter Pan” del director

P.J. Hogan: el capitán Hook y el Señor Darling.

Además, Isaacs ha hecho varias películas con su amigo, el director Paul

Anderson, entre ellas: la película de misterio y ciencia ficción “Event Horizon”,

“Soldier” y el film de culto británico “Shopping”. El que tenga vista de lince lo

descubrirá en unos cuantos cameo en los filmes: “Resident Evil” de Anderson,

“Elektra” de Rob Bowman; la película experimental de Mike Figgis, “Hotel”; y

más recientemente en “Grindhouse”. Otras de las películas en las que trabajó

son: “The End of the Affair”, la taquillera “Armageddon”, “Dragonheart”,

“Divorcing Jack”, el musical “The Last Minute” y “The Tall Guy”, película que

fue su debut cinematográfico.

Isaacs nació en Liverpool, Inglaterra, y asistió a la Universidad de Bristol

donde estudió Leyes. Él dirigió y/o protagonizó más de veinte producciones

teatrales.

Tras graduarse de la prestigiosa Escuela Central de Interpretación y

Locución de Londres, el actuó dos temporadas en la exitosa serie de la televisión

británica “Capital City”, luego trabajó en la controvertida miniserie de Lynda

LaPlante, “Civvies” para el canal BBC.

Sobre el escenario teatral, él creó el personaje de Louis, en la aclamada

producción en el Teatro Royal National de la obra “Angels in America - Parts 1 &

 

 

2” ganadora de un premio Pulitzer. Luego llenó las salas del los teatros Royal

Court, Almeida, el King’s Head y el del Festival de Edinburgh. Recientemente

volvió al teatro en el West End de Londres, para actuar junto a Lee Evans, en el

re-estreno de “The Dumb Waiter” de Harold Pinter, obra que se ofreció a

extensión limitada en el Trafalgar Studios, desde Febrero hasta Marzo del 2007.

GARY OLDMAN retoma el papel del padrino de Harry, Sirius Black,

personaje que interpretó en “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y

también en “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

En este momento Oldman está filmando la nueva película de Batman,

“The Dark Knight”, en la cual vuelve a tomar su antiguo papel del Lugarteniente

James Gordon, el cual ya había interpretado en la muy popular “Batman Begins”.

Oldman comenzó su carrera actoral en 1979 sobre los escenarios de

Londres. Desde 1985 hasta 1989, trabajó exclusivamente en el teatro londinense

Royal Court. En 1985, fue nombrado Mejor Nuevo Actor por la revista inglesa

“Time Out” por su actuación en “The Pope’s Wedding”. Ese mismo año

compartió con Sir Anthony Hopkins, el título de Mejor Actor otorgado por el

Círculo de Críticos de Londres.

En 1986, Oldman debutó en el cine con la película “Sid and Nancy”. Su

interpretación del legendario cantante de rock punk Sid Vicious, le valió el

premio Actor Revelación Más Prometedor, otorgado a las películas británicas por

la publicación Evening Standard. Al año siguiente, fue protagonista en la obra de

Stephen Frears “Prick Up Your Ears”, con la cual ganó al Premio al Mejor Actor

del Círculo de Críticos de Londres, por su retrato del desventurado escritor

teatral británico Joe Orton.

Desde entonces, se ha transformado en uno de los actores más talentosos y

respetados de cine, y trabajó en aclamadas e importantes películas, así también

como exitosdas películas independientes. Entre sus primeros trabajos figuran:

“Track 29” de Nicolas Roeg; “Criminal Law”; “Chattahoochee”; “Rosencrantz &

 

 

Guildenstern Are Dead” de Tom Stoppard, por cuya actuación fue candidato al

premio Independent Spirit al Mejor Actor; “State of Grace”; “Henry & June”;

“JFK” de Oliver Stone, en la cual interpretaba el papel de Lee Harvey Oswald; y

“Dracula” de Francis Ford Coppola, en la que era el actor principal.

Otras actuaciones memorables de Oldman pudieron verse en las películas:

“True Romance” de Tony Scott; “Romeo is Bleeding”; las películas de Luc Besson

“The Professional” y “The Fifth Element”; “Immortal Beloved”; “Murder in the

First”; “The Scarlett Letter” de Roland Joffe; “Basquiat” de Julian Schnabel; “Air

Force One” de Wolfgang Petersen; la versión para la pantalla grande de “Lost in

Space”; y “Hannibal” de Ridley Scott.

En 1995 Oldman y su manager y socio productor Douglas Urbanski,

formaron la compañía productora The SE8 Group, con la cual produjeron la

primera película de Oldman como director “Nil by Mouth”, la cual Oldman

también escribió. La película se estrenó en 1997 en el 50avo competencia del

Festival de Cine de Cannes. Allí Kathy Burke ganó el Premio a la Mejor Actriz

por su interpretación. Además, Oldman ganó dos premios de la Academia

Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) , a la Mejor Película Británica y

al Mejor Guión, también ganó el premio al Director del británico del Canal 4,

durante el Festival de Cine Internacional de Edinburgo 1997; más el Premio

Empire a la Mejor Película Debutante. Oldman fue productor ejecutivo y

protagonista en la película de su compañía SE8 Group, “The Contender”, la cual

tuvo dos nominaciones para el Oscar, y la candidatura de Oldman al Mejor Actor

Secundario para los premios de Gremio de Actores de Cine (SAG).

On televisión, Oldman fue postulado al premio Emmy por su papel como

estrella invitada, de un actor alcohólico, en la popular serie cómica “Friends”.

Otros de sus trabajos en televisión se vieron en los telefims: “Meantime”, dirigido

por Mike Leigh, y “The Firm”, dirigido por Alan Clarke.

 

 

ALAN RICKMAN retoma su papel como el enigmático maestro de

pociones, Severus Snape, personaje que ha interpretado anteriormente en todas

las películas de Harry Potter.

Próximamente será el juez Turpin en la versión para la pantalla grande del

musical “Sweeney Todd” de Stephen Sondheim, dirigido por Tim Burton, el cual

se estrenará en Diciembre del 2007.

Rickman era un actor teatral varias veces premiado en su nativa

Inglaterra, cuando en 1988 debutó en el cine con la película rompetaquillas “Die

Hard”. Desde entonces ha sido galardonado repetidas veces por su labor tanto en

cine como en televisión.

En 1992, ganó el Premio de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y

Televisión (BAFTA) al Mejor Actor Secundario, por su interpretación del Sheriff

de Nottingham en “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves”. Ese mismo año, ganó los

premios al Mejor Actor tanto de la publicación Evening Standard de cine

británico, como el del Círculo de Críticos de Cine de Londres, por su trabajo en

esa película. Volvió a ser premiado por las películas: “Truly, Madly, Deeply” de

Anthony Minghella y “Close My Eyes” de Stephen Poliakoff. El Círculo de

Críticos de Cine de Londres agregó a las lista “Quigley Down Under” en la que

también actuó. Más tarde se encontró listado para los premios de la BAFTA por

su actuación en las películas “Sense and Sensibility” de Ang Lee y “Michael

Collins” de Neil Jordan.

En 1997, Rickman ganó los premios Emmy, Globo de Oro y el del Gremio

de Actores de Cine (SAG) por su actuación en la película “Rasputin”, del canal

HBO. Más recientemente volvió a ser candidato al premio Emmy por su labor en

la aclamada película del canal HBO, “Something the Lord Made”.

Entre otros de los trabajos de Rickman en cine, se encuentran las películas:

“Nobel Son”, “Perfume: The Story of a Murderer”, “Snow Cake”, “Love

Actually”, “Blow Dry”, “Galaxy Quest”, “Dogma”, “Judas Kiss” y “Mesmer”,

 

 

esta última por la cual ganó el Premio al Mejor Actor en el Festival de Cine de

Montreal 1994.

En 1997, Rickman debutó como director con el filme “The Winter Guest”,

protagonizado por Emma Thompson. El también había escrito el guión con

Sharman Macdonald a partir de la obra original de Macdonald. Elegida para la

selección oficial del Festival de Cine de Venecia, la película fue candidata al León

de Oro, y ganó otros dos premios. Más tarde fue nombrada Mejor Película

durante la selección para le Festival de Cine de Chicago. Rickman también

dirigió la obra teatral en los teatros West Yorkshire Playhouse y en el Almeida de

Londres. Además él dirigió las obras “Wax Acts” y “My Name is Rachel Corrie”

– esta última ganó los premios a la Mejor Obra Nueva y al Mejor Director de los

premios Theatregoers’ Choice – que se ofrecieron en teatros del West End.

Rickman estudió en la Academia Real de Artes Dramáticas, tras lo que se

unió a la Compañía Royal Shakespeare (RSC) por dos temporadas. En 1985,

Rickman creó el papel del Vizconde de Valmont en “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”,

y en 1987, fue candidato a los premios Tony, al retomar el papel en Broadway.

Más recientemente Rickman protagonizó la producción de “Private Lives” de

Noel Coward en el West End, con lo cual ganó el premio Variety Club, y fue

propuesto para los premios Olivier y Evening Standard al Mejor Actor. La obra

luego pasó a Broadway, en donde Rickman fue postulado por segunda vez al

premio Tony al Mejor Actor.

FIONA SHAW una vez más vuelve a hacer el papel de la tía de Harry,

Petunia Dursley, que vive para malcriar a su hijo, Dudley. Ella interpretó el

mismo papel en “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, en “Harry Potter and

the Chamber of Secrets” y en “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”.

Al principio de este año, Shaw pudo ser vista en la aclamada película de

suspenso “Fracture”, junto a Anthony Hopkins y a Ryan Gosling. El año pasado,

fue co-protagonista en la comedia romántica “Catch and Release” y en la película

 

 

de Brian De Palma “The Black Dahlia”. Su próximo trabajo será la comedia de

aventuras “The Other Side”. Otras películas en las que trabajó la actriz son:

“Close Your Eyes”, “The Triumph of Love”, “The Last September”, “The

Avengers”, “The Butcher Boy”, “Anna Karenina”, “Jane Eyre”, “Persuasion”, “3

Men and a Little Lady”, “Mountains of the Moon” y “My Left Foot”.

Shaw es una de las más aclamadas actrices inglesas. Recientemente recibió

el Premio del Evening Standard, por su labor en el re-estreno en Londres de

“Medea”. Cuando la producción pasó a Nueva york, Shaw recibió el premio de

la Orden del Imperio Británico (OBI), y una nominación al Tony por su labor.

Anteriormente, recibió el premio Olivier a la Mejor Actriz por su actuación como

Rosalind en “As You Like It”; los premios Olivier y el del Círculo de Críticos de

Londres por su actuación en “The Good Person of Sichuan” y en “Electra”;

volvió a recibir el Premio del Círculo de Críticos de Londres por el papel

protagónico de “Hedda Gabler”; el premio Olivier y el Evening Standard Drama,

por su actuación en la obra de Stephen Daldry “Machinal”; y el Premio de los

Críticos de Nueva York, por su virtuosa interpretación en la obra de T.S. Elliot,

“The Waste Land”.

Shaw también trabajó para el Teatro Royal National con la Compañía

Teatral Royal Shakespeare, y también en escenarios de su nativa Irlanda.

Además realizó una gira mundial con la obra “The Waste Land”.

Shaw volvió a retomar sus personajes de las obras “The Waste Land”,

“Hedda Gabler” y “Richard II” para el canal BBC. Entre sus trabajos en

televisión, cabe mencionar la reciente miniserie del canal ABC, “Empire”, y

también “The Seventh Stream”, “Mind Games”, “Gormenghast”, “RKO 281”,

“Seascape” y “For the Greater Good” de Danny Boyle.

En el año 2000, Shaw fue nombrada Oficial de las Artes y las Letras en

Francia, y al año siguiente formó parte de la Lista de Honor de Año Nuevo, de

los premios Comandante de la Orden del Imperio Británico (CBE).

 

 

MAGGIE SMITH actúa una vez más como la profesora Minerva

McGonagall, en la escuela, papel que ya había realizado en todas las otras

películas de Harry Potter.

Smith es s una de las mejores actrices de la industria, y ha sido

galardonada varias veces tanto por su trabajo en teatro, como en cine y

televisión. Recibió dos premios de la Academia: su primer por su inolvidable

actuación en el papel protagónico en “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie” en 1969,

papel por el cual fue postulada a los premios de la Academia Británica de Artes

de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA), y al Globo de Oro. Una década más tarde, ganó su

segundo Oscar, el Globo de Oro, el Premio del Evening Standard y una

nominación al premio de la BAFTA, por su papel en “California Suite”. Más

recientemente, estuvo listada para los premios Oscar, Globo de Oro y el de la

BAFTA, por su actuación en la película de Robert Altman, “Gosford Park”, por la

cual también ganó los premios compartidos como parte del reparto, del Gremio

de Actores de Cine (SAG) y el Critics’ Choice.

Entre la miríada de galardones por su actuación en películas, cabe

mencionar su candidatura al Oscar por las películas: “Othello”, “Travels with My

Aunt” y “A Room with a View”, por las cuales ella ganó los premios de la

BAFTA y el Globo de Oro; el premio de la BAFTA por “A Private Function” y

“The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne”, y también el premio de películas

Evening Standard por esta última. Más recientemente, Smith ganó el premio

Emmy por su actuación en la película del canal HBO, “My House in Umbria”.

Smith debutó en escena con la Sociedad de Drama de la universidad de

Oxford en 1952, y luego debutó en Nueva York econ “The New Faces of 1956

Revue”. Tres años más tarde, Ella se juntó a la Compañía Old Vic y ganó el

premio Evening Standard 1962 a la Mejor Actriz, por su trabajo en las películas

“The Private Ear” y “The Public Eye”. Smith comenzó a trabajar en el Teatro

Nacional en 1963, actuando como Desdemona junto a Laurence Olivier, en la

obra “Othello”. Otras producciones en las que actuó con el Teatro Nacional

 

 

fueron: “Black Comedy”, “Miss Julie”, “The Country Wife”, “The Beaux

Stratagem”, “Much Ado About Nothing” y “Hedda Gabler”.

En 1969 pasó a la pantalla grande, y su actuación en “The Prime of Miss

Jean Brodie” le valió un Oscar. El público del presente tal vea reconozca más a

Smith por su trabajo en las películas de “Harry Potter”, y por otros papeles que

interpretó en “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood”, “The First Wives Club”,

“Sister Act”, “The Secret Garden” y en la película de Steven Spielberg, “Hook”.

Otros de sus trabajos que se deben mencionar, se vieron en “Becoming Jane”,

“Ladies in Lavender”, “The Last September”, “Washington Square”, “Richard

III”, “The Missionary”, “Death on the Nile”, “Murder by Death” y “The Honey

Pot”.

A través de su carrera teatral, Smith trabajó en los escenarios de teatros de

Londres y Nueva York. Ganó un Premio Tony por su labor en “Lettice and

Lovage”, y anteriormente fue candidata al premio Tony por “Night and Day” y

“Private Lives”. También ganó los premios la Drama del Evening Standard por

su actuación en “Virginia” y “Three Tall Women”.

En televisión, Smith fue nominada al Emmy por su trabajo en los telefilms

“Suddenly, Last Summer” y “David Copperfield”, esta última por la cual

también fue listada a los premios Televisivos BAFTA. Además, nuevamente fue

candidata al premio Televisivo BAFTA por las películas para televisión

“Memento Mori” y “Mrs. Silly”, y también por la miniserie “Talking Heads”, por

la cual ganó el Premio de la sociedad Real de Televisión.

Fue nombrada Dame Maggie Smith en 1990 título de Dama del Imperio

Británico. Ella es Miembro del Instituto Británico de Filmación, y recibió el

Premio de Plata Logros de toda una Vida, otorgado por la BAFTA, en 1993.

IMELDA STAUNTON se suma al reparto como la nueva maestra de

Defensa Contra las Artes de la Oscuridad en la escuela Hogwarts, la

despiadadamente ambiciosa Dolores Umbridge.

 

 

En el año 2004, Staunton interpretó el papel protagónico en el drama

“Vera Drake” de Mike Leigh, donde ofreció una extraordinaria actuación que fue

reconocida tanto por los críticos como por los espectadores. Por su trabajo en la

película, Staunton fue postulada a varios premios a la Mejor Actriz, entre ellos: al

Premio de la Academia, al Globo de Oro, y al del Gremio de Actores de Cine

(SAG). Ella ganó el Premio de la BAFTA, el del Evening Standard al cine

Británico, el Premio al Cine Británico Independiente, el Premio al cine Europeo, y

el Premio a la Mejor Actriz del Festival de Cine de Venecia 2004. Además,

Staunton fue nombrada Mejor Actriz por varios grupos de críticos, entre ellos del

Círculo de Críticos de Nueva York, el Círculo de Críticos de Los Angeles, el

Círculo de Críticos de Londres, el Círculo de Críticos de Toronto, el Círculo de

Críticos de Cine de Chicago, y el de la Sociedad Nacional de Críticos de Cine,

entre otros.

Más recientemente, Staunton protagonizó el drama de la vida real de

Richard LaGravenese, “Freedom Writers”, junto a Hilary Swank; y la comedia

fantástica de Kirk Jones, “Nanny McPhee”, con Emma Thompson. Otros de sus

trabajos en cine son: “Bright Young Things” de Stephen Fry; “Crush” de John

McKay, con Andie MacDowell; la película ganadora del Oscar, de John Madden

“Shakespeare in Love”, por la cual ella compartió el premio del SAG a la

Actuación sobresaliente del Reparto; “Twelfth Night” de Trevor Nunn; “Sense

and Sensibility” de Ang Lee; las películas de Kenneth Branagh “Peter’s Friends”

y “Much Ado About Nothing”; y “Antonia & Jane” de Beeban Kidron. Staunton

prestó su voz a varias películas animadas, más notablemente la animada con

muñecos de plastilina “Chicken Run”.

Staunton fue galardonada por su trabajo en los escenarios de Londres.

Ganó tres premios Olivier por su actuación en “A Chorus of Disapproval”, “The

Corn is Green” e “Into the Woods”. Además, fue postulada a tres premios

Olivier por su actuación en “Uncle Vanya”, “The Wizard of Oz” y “Guys and

Dolls”. Entre su extenso repertorio teatral, merecen distinguirse las obras: “There

 

 

Came a Gypsy Riding”, “Calico”, “The Beggar’s Opera”, “The Fair Maid 3 the

West”, “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?”, “Habeas Corpus”, “Travesties”,

“Electra”, “A Little Night Music”, “Mack and Mabel” y “She Stoops to Conquer”.

Staunton es bien conocida por el público de televisión británico, por sus

papeles en telefilms como “Cranford Chronicles”, “The Wind in the Willows”,

“My Family and Other Animals”, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”,

“Fingersmith”, “Cambridge Spies”, “David Copperfield”, “Citizen X” y “The

Singing Detective”. Ella tuvo papeles recurrentes en varias series, la más reciente,

“Little Britain”.

En el año 2006, Staunton distinguida el Lista de Honor de Año Nuevo de

la Orden del Imperio Británico (OBE).

DAVID THEWLIS vuelve a ser parte del reparto como el profesor Remus

Lupin, que enseña Defensa Contra las Artes de la Oscuridad.

Thewlis comenzó a ser conocido internacionalmente cuando actuó en el

drama de Mike Leigh, “Naked”. Su impresionante interpretación del papel

principal le valió el Premio al Mejor Actor en el Festival de Cine de Cannes 1993

Cannes, y ganó honores de Mejor Actor de los Círculos de Críticos de Cine de

Londres y de Nueva York, más el premio de Evening Standard. Ya había

trabajado con Leigh previamente, en la película “Life is Sweet” y en el film de

televisión “The Short and Curlies”.

Thewlis actuó en más de 30 película a los largo de 20 años de carrera,

entre ellas: “Vroom” de Beeban Kidron, “Resurrected” de Paul Greengras,

“Damage” de Louis Malle, “The Trial” de David Jones, “Black Beauty” de

Caroline Thompson, “Total Eclipse” de Agnieszka Holland, “Restoration” de

Mike Hoffman, “Dragonheart” de Rob Cohen, “The Island of Dr. Moreau” de

John Frankenheimer, “Seven Years in Tibet” de Jean-Jacques Annaud, “The Big

Lebowski” de los hermanos Coen, “Besieged” de Bernardo Bertolucci, “Whatever

Happened to Harold Smith?” de Peter Hewitt, “Timeline” de Richard Donner,

 

 

“Kingdom of Heaven” de Ridley Scott, el capítulo “All the Invisible Children” de

Jordan Scott, “The New World” de Terrence Malik, “Basic Instinct 2: Risk

Addiction” de Michael Caton-Jones y la nueva versión de “The Omen” de John

Moore.

Hace poco terminó de filmar la película independiente “The Inner Life of

Martin Frost”, en la cual él es el protagonista. En este momento está filmando

“The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas”, dirigida por Mark Heyman y producida por

David Heyman.

Además de su trabajo de actor, Thewlis debutó como escritor y director

con el corto “Hello, Hello, Hello”, que obtuvo una nominación de la BAFTA al

Mejor cortometraje. Recientemente, en el año 2003, él dirigió y actuó la película

independiente “Cheeky”.

En televisión, Thewlis trabajó en telefilmes como: “Dinotopia”,

“Endgame”, “Dandelion Dead”, y la ganadora “Prime Suspect 3”, “Black and

Blue”, “Journey to Knock”, “Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit”, “Skulduggery” y

“The Singing Detective”. También tuvo un papel recurrente en la serie “A Bit of

Do”.

Además de su trabajo en cine y televisión, Thewlis actuó en varias obras

de teatro, entre ellas: “The Sea”, dirigida por Sam Mendes en el Teatro Royal

National; “Ice Cream” en el teatro Royal Court; “Buddy Holly” en el teatro Regal

de Greenwich; “Ruffian on the Stairs/The Woolley” en Farnham; y “The Lady

and the Clarinet” en el Kings Head.

EMMA THOMPSON vuelve a ser la profesora Sybill Trelawney, papel

que desempeñó por primera vez en la película de Harry Potter, “Harry Potter

and the Prisoner of Azkaban”.

Thompson hace poco protagonizó la comedia/ drama “Stranger than

Fiction”. Estuvo virtualmente irreconocible, en el papel protagonista de “Nanny

McPhee”, película para la cual ella misma escribió el guión. En este momento se

 

 

encuentra trabajando en una secuela de “Nanny McPhee”. También en este

momento, Thompson está filmando “Brideshead Revisited”, en la que actúa

junto a Michael Gambon, y también actúa en el drama romántico “Last Chance

Harvey”, junto a Dustin Hoffman.

Thompson es uno de los más reconocidos talentos tanto como actriz como

escritora de guiones. En 1993, su papel en el drama de Merchant Ivory,

“Howards End”, le permitió arrasar con los premios a la Mejor Actriz de la

Academia, los Globos de Oro, los de la BAFTA y del Evening Standard de Cine,

además de los premios de los grupos de Críticos de Cine de New York y Los

Angeles, el de la Sociedad Nacional de Críticos de Cine y la Junta Nacional de

Críticos. Al año siguiente, Thompson fue postulada para el Oscar y el Globo de

Oro a la Mejor Actriz, por la película de James Ivory “The Remains of the Day”.

También fue candidata al premio de la BAFTA , y al de Mejor Actriz Secundaria

en la película de Jim Sheridan “In the Name of the Father”. Thompson ganó el

premio Evening Standard de filmación por su trabajo en “The Remains of the

Day” y por la película de Kenneth Branagh “Much Ado About Nothing”.

En 1996, Thompson recibió dos nominaciones al Premio de la Academia, y

ganó con su papel en la película de Ang Lee “Sense and Sensibility” y ganó el

Oscar por su guión, adaptado del libro de Jane Austen. Los honres la

convirtieron en la única persona que ganó los premios de la Academia en ambas

categorías: la Actuación y a la Escritura. Además, ella ganó el Premio a la Mejor

Adaptación de un Guión otorgado por el Gremio de Escritores de América y de

Gran Bretaña, y asimismo el premio de Círculos de Críticos de Nueva York, Los

Angeles, Boston, Londres y el Círculo de Críticos de Televisión. Ella también

ganó el Globo de Oro y el Premio de Cine del Evening Standard y fue candidata

al premio de la BAFTA. Por su papel en la película ganó el premio de la BAFTA

y el de la Junta Nacional de Críticos, y fue nominada a los Globos de Oro y al

premio del Gremio del Actores de Cine.

 

 

Sus reconocimientos en películas más recientes fueron: un premio Evening

Standard de Cine, un Premio Empire y el Premio del Círculo de Críticos de Cine

de Londres, por la película de Richard Curtis “Love Actually”, por la cual ella

fue postulada al premio de la BAFTA. En la pantalla chica, Thompson recibió

propuestas para los premios Emmy y SAG por sus múltiples papeles en la

miniserie del canal HBO del 2003, “Angels in America”, dirigida por Mike

Nichols. Ella y Nichols ya habían trabajado juntos previamente, en la película

“Wit” del canal HBO, en la cual ella actuaba bajo su dirección. Además, ellos coescribieron

el guión, basándose en la obra de Margaret Edson, por lo cual

ganaron el premio Humanitis y compartieron una nominación al premio Emmy.

Thompson fue también listada para los premios Emmy, Globo de Oro y el de la

SAG por su actuación en el drama. Previamente había Ganado el premio Emmy

por su muy graciosa interpretación en el programa cómico “Ellen”.

Thompson casi nació literalmente en el mundo del espectáculo. Su padre,

Eric Thompson, era director teatral y escritor, y su madre, Phyllida Law, era

actriz. Mientras que estudiaba inglés en Cambridge, fue invitada a integrar el

grupo de comedia de la escuela Footlights. Thompson co-dirigió la primera obra

sólo de mujeres de Cambridge, “Women’s Hour”. Siendo aún estudiante, debutó

en televisión en el programa de la BBC, “Friday Night, Saturday Morning”.

A lo largo de la década del ’80, Thompson apareció frecuentemente en la

televisión británica. Un buen ejemplo es el telefilm “The Crystal Cube” y un

papel recurrente en la serie “Alfresco”, ambas con Hugh Laurie. En 1985, el

Canal 4 británico, le ofreció a Thompson tener su propio especial de TV, “Up for

Grabs”, y en 1988, ella escribió y actuó la serie de la BBC llamada “Thompson”.

Manteniéndose siempre activa en teatro, Thompson apareció en “A Sense

of Nonsense”, en gira por Inglaterra; en la obra que ella misma escribió “Short

Vehicle”, en el Festival de Edinburgo 1983; “Me and My Girl”, primero en

Leicester y después en el West End de Londres en 1985, y en “Look Back in

Anger” en el teatro Lyric en 1989.

 

 

En 1989, debutó en el cine con la comedia “The Tall Guy” e interpretó el

papel de Catherine, en la película debut como director de Kenneth Branagh

“Henry V”. Otros de sus trabajos en cine son: “Dead Again” de Branagh y

“Peter’s Friends”; “Junior” de Ivan Reitman; “Carrington” de Christopher

Hampton; “The Winter Guest” de Alan Rickman; y “Primary Colors” de Mike

Nichols.

JULIE WALTERS vuelve a tomar su maternal papel de Mrs. Weasley, el

cual ya había tenido en “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, “Harry Potter

and the Chamber of Secrets” y “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban”.

Se la podrá ver a Walters este otoño, en la película independiente

“Becoming Jane”. También actuará junto a Meryl Streep en la versión para cine

del musical “Mama Mia!”

Walters fue postulada dos veces al premio de la Academia. La primera

vez en 1984 por su película debut “Educating Rita”, con la cual ganó los premios

de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) y el del Globo

de Oro. La segunda vez que fue listada para el Oscar fue por su actuación en la

película “Billy Elliot” de Stephen Daldry. Ella hacía de la maestra de danzas de

Billy, y dicho rol le valió los premios BAFTA, Empire, Evening Standard de Cine

y el del Círculo de Críticos de Cine de Londres; además de ser postulada a los

premios Globo de Oro y de Cine Europeo, mas dos postulaciones al los premios

del Gremio de Actores de Cine, una en la categoría Mejor Actriz Secundaria, y el

segundo compartido con sus compañeros por Actuación Sobresaliente del

Reparto. Walters también fue candidata a los premios de la BAFTA por su

actuación en las películas “Personal Services” y “Stepping Out”, y ganó el

premio Variety Club por esta última.

Entre los trabajos anteriores de Walters se incluyen: “Driving Lessons”,

con el actor Rupert Grint, supuestamente su hijo en Harry Potter, “Wah-Wah”,

“Calendar Girls”, “Before You Go”, “Titanic Town” de Roger Michell, “Girls’

 

 

Night”, “Intimate Relations”, “Sister My Sister”, “Just Like a Woman”, “Buster”

y “Prick Up Your Ears” de Stephen Frears.

Walters trabajó mucho en la televisión británica y ganó recientemente tres

premios Televisivos de la BAFTA, consecutivamente en los años 2002, 2003 y

2004 por su actuación en “Strange Relations”; “Murder” – por la cual también

ganó el Premio Real de Televisión -, y la serie “The Canterbury Tales”, por la cual

ella también ganó el Premio de la Prensa de Televisión. Anteriormente, fue

candidata cuatro veces al Premio Televisivo de la BAFTA: en1983 por la

miniserie “Boys From the Blackstuff”; en 1987 por la serie “Victoria Wood: As

Seen on TV”; en 1994 por el telefilm “The Wedding Gift”; y en 1999 por la series

“Dinnerladies”. Entre sus trabajos en televisión cabe mencionar: “The Ruby in

the Smoke”, “Ahead of the Class”, “The Return”, “Oliver Twist”, “Jake’s

Progress”, “Pat and Margaret”, “The Summer House”, “Julie Walters and

Friends”, “Talking Heads” y “The Birthday Party”, por nombrar algunos.

Walters es también una lograda actriz de teatro, y en el año 2001, ganó el

Premio Olivier por su actuación en la obra de Arthur Miller “All My Sons”.

Anteriormente, fue postulada al premio Olivier por su trabajo en la obra de Sam

Shepard “Fool for Love”. Debutó en los escenarios de Londres con “Educating

Rita”, creando allí el personaje que luego llevaría a la pantalla. Entre sus trabajos

en teatro, están las producciones de las obras “Jumpers”, “Having a Ball”,

“Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune”, “When I was a Girl I Used to Scream

and Shout”, “The Rose Tattoo” de Tennessee Williams, y el musical “Acorn

Antiques”.

Además de su trabajo como actriz, Walters escribe, y su primera novela,

“Maggie’s Tree”, se publicó en el año 2006.

ROBERT HARDY vuelve a tomar su papel de Cornelius Fudge, el

Ministro de la Magia, que ya había interpretado en “Harry Potter and the

 

 

Chamber of Secrets”, “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y “Harry

Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Hardy es un actor muy respetado en Gran Bretaña, y tiene una carrera que

se expande a los largo de seis décadas, tanto en cine, televisión y teatro.

Recientemente fue co-protagonista en la película para la familia “Lassie”. Entre

sus muchos trabajos en cine, caben mencionar las películas: “The Gathering”,

“The Tichborne Claimant” de David Yates, “An Ideal Husband”, “Mrs.

Dalloway”, “Sense and Sensibility” de Ang Lee, “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

de Kenneth Branagh, “Paris by Night” de David Hare, “The Shooting Party”,

“Yellow Dog”, “Young Winston” de Richard Attenborough, la película clásica de

suspenso de Martin Ritt “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold”, y otros muchos

filmes franceses.

Tal vez Hardy sea más conocido poor su trabajo en televisión, en donde

realizó siete temporadas de la serie “All Creatures Great and Small”, por la cual

fue postulado al premio Televisivo de la BAFTA. Volvió a llenar las listas de los

premios Televisivos de la BAFTA y ganó el premio otorgados por al Gremio de

Prensa de Televisión, por su interpretación de Winston Churchill, en la miniserie

“Winston Churchill: The Wilderness Years”. En 1988, hizo de Churchill dos

veces, en la miniseries “War and Remembrance” y en el telefilm “The Woman He

Loved”. Recientemente volvió a retomar el papel de Churchill para el telefilm del

2006, “Marple: The Sittaford Mystery”. Entre sus más de 80 trabajos en televisión,

cabe mencionar “Death in Holy Orders”, “Lucky Jim”, “The Falklands Play”,

“Bertie and Elizabeth”, “Shackleton”, “The Lost World”, “The 10th Kingdom”,

“Gulliver’s Travels”, “Jenny’s War”, “The Far Pavillions”, “Edward the King”,

“The Gathering Storm”, “Elizabeth R”, y las series “Hot Metal” y “Mogul”.

Hardy comenzó su carrera en actuación sobre los escenarios en 1949, junto

con el Teatro Shakespeare Memorial en Stratford-upon-Avon. Su distinguida

carrera teatral, le dio la oportunidad de actuar en las obras “Much Ado About

Nothing”, “The River Line”, “Camino Real”, “The Rehearsal”, “A Severed

 

 

Head”, “The Constant Couple”, “Habeas Corpus”, “Dear Liar”, “Body and

Soul”, y el rol principal de Winston Churchill, en la producción francesa “The

Man Who Said No” en el Palacio del Congreso de París.

Hardy escribió y co-dirigió la película para televisión “The Picardy

Affair”, la obra radiofónica “The Leopard and the Lilies”, y dos documentales

para el programa de la BBC “Chronicle”. Además, él publicó dos libros sobre

guerras medievales titulados Longbow y The Great War-Bow.

DAVID BRADLEY vuelve al papel de conserje de Hogwarts, Argus Filch,

papel que ya había interpretado en otras películas de Harry Potter.

Bradley es uno de los más distinguidos actores ingleses, miembro por

largo tiempo de la Compañía Royal Shakespeare (RSC) y el Teatro Nacional. En

1991, ganó el Premio Olivier por su actuación como el loco en la obra “King

Lear” que se ofreció en el Teatro Nacional. En 1993, ganó el Premio Clarence

Derwent por su papel de Polonius en “Hamlet”, y el de Shallow en “Henry IV,

Part II” en el RSC, resultando candidato al premio Olivier por esta última obra.

Recientemente volvió a ser listado para el premio Olivier en el año 2006, por su

actuación protagónica en “Henry IV, Parts I and II”, en el Teatro Nacional.

Entre sus numerosas actuaciones en el repertorio de RSC, cabe mencionar:

“Titus Andronicus”, “The Tempest”, “Julius Caesar”, “The Alchemist”, “Dr.

Faustus”, “Cymbeline”, “Three Sisters”, “Twelfth Night”, “Tartuffe”, y “The

Merchant of Venice”, por nombrar algunas. Sus actuaciones en el Teatro

Nacional fueron muchas, y una lista parcial de las obras en las que actuó ellas es

esta: “The Night Season”, “The Mysteries”, “The Homecoming”, “Mother

Courage”, “Richard III”, “Measure for Measure”, “The Cherry Orchard”, “`Tis

Pity She’s a Whore” y “The Front Page”. El público de los teatros del West End

pudo ver a Bradley en obras como “Uncle Vanya”, “Britannicus”, “Phedre” y

“Funny Peculiar”.

 

 

En la pantalla grande, cabe mencionar la actuación de Bradley en las

películas: “Hot Fuzz”, “Red Mercury”, “Exorcist: The Beginning”, “Nicholas

Nickleby”, “The Intended”, “This is Not a Love Song”, “Gabriel & Me”, “Blow

Dry”, “The King is Alive”, “Tom’s Midnight Garden” y “Left Luggage”.

Bradley es una cara familiar para los televidentes británicos, que vieron

trabajar previamente a Bradley con David Yates en la miniserie “The Way We

Live Now”. El actor también trabajó en varias películas para televisión, como:

“Sweeney Todd”, “Mr. Harvey Lights a Candle”, “Blue Dove”, “The Last King”,

“”The Mayor of Casterbridge”, “Murphy’s Law”, “Sweet Dreams”, “Vanity

Fair”, “Our Mutual Friend”, “Reckless”, “Our Friends in the North” y “Martin

Chuzzlewit”. Bradley fue actor invitado en numerosas serie, y tuvo un papel

recurrente en la serie “A Family at War”.

MARK WILLIAMS vuelve como Arthur Weasley, el patriarca de la

familia Weasley, papel que ya había interpretado en “Harry Potter and the

Chamber of Secrets”, “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” y “Harry

Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Tras graduarse de la Universidad de Oxford, Williams se volvió conocido

en Inglaterra, por su trabajo en cine, televisión y teatro. Entre las películas para

cine en las que actuó, están: “Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story” de

Michael Winterbottom, “Anita and Me” de Metin Huseyin, “The Borrowers” de

Peter Hewitt, “101 Dalmatians” de Stephen Herek, “Fever” de Karen Adler,

“Prince of Jutland” de Gabriel Axel, “High Season” de Clare Peploe, la película

del Instituto de Cine Británico “Out of Order” y “Privileged” de Michael

Hoffman.

Tal vez Williams sea más conocido en Gran Bretaña por su actuación

regular en la serie televisiva de la BBC, “The Fast Show”, en la cual actuó durante

cuatro temporadas, y también en el especial de Navidad. Entre sus trabajos más

recientes en televisión está la serie “Carrie & Barrie” y los telefilms “The Rotters’

 

 

Club” y “Viva Blackpool”. Próximamente se los verá en la miniserie adaptación

de la obra de Jane Austen “Sense and Sensibility”. El también trabajó en películas

como: “Red Dwarf”, “Stuff”, “Bottom”, “Harry Enfield”, “Tumbledown”,

“Making Out”, “Kinsey”, “Bad Company”, “Hunting Venus” y “Happy Birthday

Shakespeare”. Williams fue invitado para uno de los equipos del show “Jumpers

for Goalposts”.

En 2002, Williams presentó una serie en 10 partes para el Discovery

Channel, titulada “Industrial Revelations with Mark Williams”, a lo que siguió

“On the Rails with Mark Williams” en el año 2004 y “More Industrial Revelations

with Mark Williams” en el 2005. Su documental más reciente fue “Mark

Williams’ Big Bangs”, una serie en cuatro partes para Sky One. Además,

Williams dirigió “Festival”, un programa cómico del Canal 4. También co –

produjo el programa cómico “In Exile” para el Canal 4.

En teatro, Williams pasó tres años haciendo giras por barco con la

compañía teatral Mikron. Entre sus trabajos en escenarios, cabe mencionar su

papel protagónico en “William” con el Teatro Royal Court en el Festival de

Jóvenes Escritores; “Fanshen” en el Teatro Nacional; “Doctor of Honour”, para la

compañía teatral Cheek by Jowl; “The City Wives Confederacy” en el teatro

Greenwich; “Moscow Gold”, “Singer”, “A Dream of People” y “As You Like It”,

para la Compañía Royal Shakespeare; “Art” que se ofreció en el West End; y

“Toast” en el Teatro Royal Court. En 1988, pudo actuar a sala llena en “The Fast

Show Live on Stage”. En el año 2002, “The Fast Show Live on Tour” se ofreció

con gran éxito a lo largo de toda Inglaterra.

TOM FELTON vuelve a Harry Potter como el archi- enemigo de Harry

Draco Malfoy, de la casa Slytherin, papel que ha desempeñado en las cinco

películas de “Harry Potter”.

 

 

Se lo vio por primera vez en cine en 1996, en el papel de Peagreen Clock,

en la película fantástica de Peter Hewitt, “The Borrowers”. En 1999, hizo del hijo

de Jodie Foster, Louis, en “Anna & the King”.

En televisión, Felton actuó en varias series británicas, entre ellas “Bugs”,

en la que actúa como James, y en “Second Sight”, junto con Clive Owen. Felton

también actuó en dos obras de la BBC Radio 4, “The Wizard of Earthsea” y

“Here’s to Everyone”.

El joven actor comenzó a actuar profesionalmente a sus ocho años.

Comenzó a ser conocido en 1995, cuando apareció en diversos anuncios

publicitarios de primera categoría en televisión. Cuando él no está actuando, y

aprovecha cualquier oportunidad para ir a pescar.

MATTHEW LEWIS actúa como el leal amigo de Harry Potter, Neville

Longbottom, personaje que interpretó en todas las películas de Harry Potter.

Lewis comenzó a actuar cuando tenía sólo cinco años, tras unirse a un

club amateur de teatro. El consiguió el papel de Neville tras pasar una selección

abierta a la que había respondido en Leeds, su ciudad natal.

Además de las películas de Harry Potter films, Lewis ha protagonizado

numerosas series de televisión inglesas, entre las que figuran “Heart Beat”, “City

Central”, “Where the Heart Is”, “Sharpe”, “Dalziel and Pascoe” y “Some Kind Of

Life”.

Cuando Lewis no está ocupado con rodajes, disfruta leyendo y

escribiendo cuentos cortos, y ha desarrollado gran interés en cinematografía.

EVANNA LYNCH debuta en Harry Potter con el papel de Luna

Lovegood.

La historia de Lynch parece de cuentos. Ella era una dedicada fanática de

Harry Potter fan, Lynch que inmediatamente se sintió identificada con Luna, tras

haber leído Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Ella hasta tomó la iniciativa

 

 

de enviar un video grabado con su actuación como Luna a la compañía de

producción, esperando así tener la oportunidad de hacer una audición para el

personaje. Luego se enteró que había una llamada abierta para actrices para

cubrir el papel, que había sido programada para Enero del 2006 en Londres. Ella

voló junto con su padre desde Dublín, lugar en que vivían, y pacientemente

formó la cola de 15 mil muchachitas que tenían sus mismas esperanzas. Lynch,

sin embargo, sobresalió, y la directora de casting y los cineastas le dieron el muy

ambicionado papel.

En su casa en County Louth, Irlanda, a Lynch le gusta pasar el tiempo con

sus mascotas (una gata llamada Luna y un gatito llamado Dumbledore). Ella

nunca antes había tenido entrenamiento en actuación, pero frecuentemente

intervenía en obras en el club de drama local. A ella le gusta la danza moderna,

el ballet y la danza contemporánea. Entre sus muchos hobbies está el diseño de

joyería, y ella hacer anillos y aretes para ella misma y sus amigas.

KATIE LEUNG aparece por segunda vez en una película de Harry Potter,

interpretando el papel de Cho Chang, la estudiante de la casa Ravenclaw en la

escuela Hogwarts, y la muchacha de la que gusta Harry Potter.

Antes de interpretar a Cho en “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”,

Leung nunca había actuado. Por casualidad, su padre vio la llamada abierta a

actrices para el papel, en una publicidad del canal chino. Leung se presentó a la

audición en la que derrotó a otras 5.000 aspirantes para el papel: el muy

ambicionado rol de la muchacha centro de la atención de Harry Potter.

Leung es una gran aficionada a la música, y escucha toda clase de estilos,

incluyendo R & B, Pop, Rock, Hip Hop; además ella toca el piano.

HARRY MELLING vuelve a unirse al reparto interpretando al consentido

primo Muggle de Harry, Dudley Dursley. El papel Dudley fue su actuación

debut en “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, el cual volvió a retomar en

 

 

“Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” y en “Harry Potter and the Prisoner

of Azkaban”.

Además, Melling es miembro del Teatro Nacional del a Juventud, con el

cual ha desempeñado papeles en las obras “The Master and Margarita”, “The

Merchant of Venice” y “Watch Over Me Three”. Melling interpretó al joven

Oliver en la película de Stephen Poliakoff, “Friends and Crocodiles” para el canal

BBC.

Melling va a la escuela en donde estudia actuación, inglés y arte.

Recientemente escribió una obra corta, la cual está tratando de producir en algún

teatro de barrio de Londres.

SOBRE LOS REALIZADORES

DAVID YATES (Director) es un director premiado, más conocido por su

trabajo en televisión.

Yates ganó su primer premio Televisivo de la Academia Británica de Artes

de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) TV por su trabajo en la miniserie de época “The

Way We Live Now”, del canal británico BBC, en la que actúan Matthew

Macfadyen y Miranda Otto. En el año 2003, él dirigió la serie dramática “State of

Play”, por la cual postulado al Premio Televisivo de la BAFTA y ganó el Premio

del Gremio de Directores De Gran Bretaña (DGGB) al Logro Sobresaliente en

Dirección. La serie también ganó los premios: del Gremio de Prensa de

Televisión, de la Sociedad Real de Televisión (RTS), y el premio Rockie a la Mejor

Serie en el Festival Banff de Televisión.

Al año siguiente, Yates dirigió el drama de dos partes “Sex Traffic”, por el

cual ganó otro premio Televisivo de la BAFTA, y fue candidato por segunda vez

al premio del DGGB. La atrevida visión del tráfico sexual le valió cantidad de

premios internacionales, entre ellos ocho premios Televisivos de la BAFTA y

cuatro de la RTS, Ambos al Mejor Drama, también el Premio del Jurado a la

 

 

Mejor miniserie en el Festival Reims de Televisión Internacional, y la Ninfa de

Oro en el Festival Monte Carlo de Televisión.

Yates recientemente fue postulado al premio Emmy a la Dirección

Sobresaliente de una Miniserie, Película o Drama Especial, por su trabajo en la

película “The Girl in the Café” para el canal HBO, en el año 2005. El filme era una

historia de amor protagonizada por Bill Nighy y Kelly Macdonald. Entre otros de

sus trabajos en televisión deben mencionarse: “The Young Visitors”, con Jim

Broadbent y Hugh Laurie, y la miniserie “The Sins”, protagonizada por Pete

Postlethwaite y Geraldine James.

Yates creció en St. Helens, Merseyside, y estudió Política en la universidad

de Essex y en la universidad de Georgetown en Washington DC. Comenzó su

carrera como director con el cortometraje “When I Was a Girl”, el cual él también

escribió. La película le valió el premio al Mejor Cortometraje Europeo del

Festival Cork de Cine Internacional en Irlanda, y un premio Golden Gate en el

Festival de Cine de San Francisco. Además con él se aseguró la entrada en la

Escuela Nacional de Cine y Televisión, de Beaconsfield, Inglaterra.

La película de su graduación “Good Looks”, ganó el premio Silver Hugo

en el Festival de Cine Internacional de Chicago. En 1998, Yates debutó como

director de cine con la película “The Tichborne Claimant”, protagonizada por

Stephen Fry y John Gielgud. Su película más reciente, “Rank”, filmada en el 2002,

fue nominada paea un premio de la BAFTA.

DAVID HEYMAN (Productor) por quinta vez es el productor de una de

las películas de la serie de adaptaciones para la pantalla grande, de las

increíblemente exitosas novelas de Harry Potter, de J.K. Rowling.

Heyman se educó en Inglaterra y en Estados Unidos, y comenzó su

carrera trabajando en la producción de la película de Milos Forman, “Ragtime” y

en la de David Lean, “A Passage to India”. Heyman se mudó a Los Ángeles

donde pasó a ser Ejecutivo Creativo para Warner Bros. Pictures, y trabajó en

 

 

películas tales como “Gorillas in the Mist” y “Goodfellas”. Heyman luego se

convirtió en vicepresidente en United Artists, y a fines de los años ’80 comenzó

una la carrera como productor independiente, realizando películas como “Juice”

de Ernest Dickenson, protagonizada por Tupac Shakur y Omar Epps, y el clásico

de bajo presupuesto “The Daytrippers”, que fue dirigido por Greg Mottola y

protagonizado por Liev Schreiber, Parker Posey, Hope Davis, Stanley Tucci y

Campbell Scott.

Tras trabajar durante varios años en los Estados Unidos, en 1997 Heyman

regresó de Norteamérica al Reino Unido para montar Heyday Films. Además de

haber porducido todas las películas de Harry Potter, la compañía produjo gran

cantidad de películas para cine y televisión, entre ellas el film “Taking Lives”,

protagonizada por Angelina Jolie y Ethan Hawke, y la serie televisiva

“Threshold”.

En este momento Heyman está produciendo “The Boy in the Striped

Pyjamas”, escrita y dirigida por Mark Heyman, en la que actúan David Thewlis y

Vera Farmiga, y es productor de “I Am Legend”, dirigida por Frances Lawrence

y protagonizada por Will Smith. Más tarde este mismo año, además de producir

“Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”, Heyman producirá “Is There

Anybody There?”, dirigida por John Crowley y protagonizada por Michael

Caine.

Otras películas que Heyday filmará este año son: “Dogs of Babel”,

dirigida por Charles McDougall; “Yes Man”, dirigida por Peyton Reed; y

“Unique”, dirigida por David Goyer. Futuros proyectos incluyen: “The Curious

Incident of the Dog in the Night-time”, que es una adaptación para cine de la

novela mejor vendida de Mark Haddon, que está siendo adaptada y dirigida por

Steve Kloves; y “The History of Love”, la cual Heyman va a co-producir con

Alfonso Cuarón.

En el 2003 Heyman ganó el Premio Productor del Año en ShoWest,

convirtiéndose en el pimer productor británico que ha sido distinguido con este

 

 

reconocimiento.

DAVID BARRON (Productor) ya había trabajado anteriormente como

productor ejecutivo, en “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” y en “Harry

Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Barron ha trabajado dentro de la industria del entretenimiento por más de

25 años. Comenzó su carrera realizando comerciales de televisión, pasando luego

a la producción de películas y programas de televisión.

Además de haber trabajado como productor, trabajó en variadas

posiciones dentro de la producción, como por ejemplo jefe de localización o

ayudante del director, jefe de producción o supervisor de producción, en filmes

tales como “The French Lieutenant’s Woman”, “The Killing Fields”,

“Revolution”, “Legend”, “The Princess Bride”, “The Lonely Passion of Judith

Hearne”, “Hellbound”, “Night Breed” y la película de Franco Zeffirelli

“Hamlet”.

En 1991, Barron fue nombrado ejecutivo, a cargo de la producción del

ambicioso proyecto para televisión de George Lucas, “The Young Indiana Jones

Chronicles”. Tras eso, trabajó como productor activo para la película “The

Muppet Christmas Carol”.

In 1993, Barron se unió al equipo de producción de Kenneth Branagh,

como productor asociado y como gerente de unidad de producción “Mary

Shelley’s Frankenstein”. Ese largometraje inició una asociación de producción

informal con Branagh, la cual terminó Barron produciendo las películas del

director: “A Midwinter’s Tale”, “Hamlet” y “Love’s Labour’s Lost”. Barron

también produjo “Othello” de Oliver Parker, en la cual actuaba Branagh junto a

Laurence Fishburne.

En la primavera de 1999, Barron fundó su propia empresa, Contagious

Films, junto con el director británico Paul Weiland. Más recientemente, Barron

lanzó una segunda compañía, Runaway Fridge Films.

 

 

MICHAEL GOLDENBERG (Guionista) recientemente co-escribió el

guión para la película en vivo de aventuras “Peter Pan”, basada en la novela

clásica de J.M. Barrie, para niños. Previamente había escrito el drama de cienciaficción

de la película dramática de Robert Zemeckis, “Contact”, basada en la

novela de Carl Sagan, y que fue protagonizada por Jodie Foster. Goldenberg

debutó en el cine escribiendo y dirigiendo el drama romántico “Bed of Roses”,

protagonizado por Christian Slater y Mary Stuart Masterson.

Goldenberg también escribe para teatro, campo en el que recibió el Premio

Richard Rodgers otorgado por la Academia Americana de Artes y Letras, por su

musical “Down the Stream”.

En este momento, Goldenberg está preparando “Uncertainty”, un drama

del futuro que él mismo va a dirigir con su propio guión.

LIONEL WIGRAM (Productor Ejecutivo) se educó en la universidad de

Oxford, en donde fue uno de los miembros fundadores de la Fundación de Cine

Oxford. Wigram comenzó a trabajar en el campo del cine todavía estando en

Oxford, como asistente de producción para Elliott Kastner, durante el tiempo de

sus vacaciones de verano. Tras graduarse, fue a trabajar con Kastner en

California. Wigram produjo su primera película, “Never on Tuesday”, en 1987, a

la que siguió “Cool Blue”, protagonizada por Woody Harrelson, y luego “Warm

Summer Rain”, con Kelly Lynch, en 1988. Durante ese mismo período, Wigram

se dedicó al desarrollo de los primeros bosquejos de lo que un día sería “Carlito’s

Way”.

En 1990, Wigram pasó a trabajar para Alive Films, como ejecutivo de

desarrollo, y trabajó en películas dirigidas por Wes Craven y Sam Shepard.

También produjo “Cool as Ice”, y fue productor ejecutivo de la película de

Steven Soderbergh “The Underneath”. En 1993, Wigram inició una compañía de

manejo de chefs, llamada Alive Culinary Resources, junto con el dueño de Alive,

 

 

Shep Gordon. Además de manejar a los mejores chefs de los Estados Unidos, la

compañía produjo series de videos de cocina para el canal Time Life, el cual

lanzó a Emeril Lagasse por primera vez.

En 1994, Wigram comenzó a trabajar en la compañía de Renny Harlin y

Geena Davis, The Forge, en donde se encargaba del desarrollo de películas como:

“The Long Kiss Goodnight”, “Cutthroat Island” y el filme de HBO, “Mistrial”.

Wigram se unió a Warner Bros. en 1996 tomando el cargo de

Vicepresidente de Producción. Desde su cargo, fue responsable de la compra de

la serie de libros de Harry Potter para el estudio. Hasta el día de la fecha, fue él

quien supervisó todas y cada una de las películas de la franquicia. El supervisó

otros trabajos, tales como las películas “The Avengers”, “The Big Tease”,

“Charlotte Gray”, “Three Kings” y “The Good German”.

En Enero del 2005, Wigram firmó un arreglo de primera opción para la

producción de películas, con Warner Bros. El continuará supervisando la

franquicia de “Harry Potter” como productor ejecutivo. Wigram es también

productor ejecutivo para el film aún por salir “August Rush”. En este momento,

Wigram está desarrollando una nueva franquicia de películas de Sherlock

Holmes para Warner Bros.

SLAWOMIR IDZIAK (Director de Fotografía) es un camarógrafo

internacionalmente reconocido. En el año 2002, fue candidato tanto al premio de

la Academia como al de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión

(BAFTA), por su trabajo en la película dramática sobre la guerra de Ridley Scott,

“Black Hawk Down”. Al principio de su carrera, en 1993, ganó el Premio a la

Mejor Fotografía en ambos festivales de cine de Venecia y Polonia, y ganó el

premio francés Cesar por su trabajo en colaboración con Krzysztof Kieslowski, en

“Three Colors: Blue”, la cual Idziak también co-escribió. Además, en 1998, ganó

un premio en el Festival de Cine de Berlín por las inolvidables imágenes que

mostró en la película de Michael Winterbottom, “I Want You”.

 

 

Idziak también filmó las películas de Antoine Fuqua “King Arthur”, la de

Taylor Hackford “Proof of Life”; la de Deborah Warner “The Last September”; la

de Cathal Black “Love and Rage”; la de Andrew Niccol “Gattaca”; la de John

Sayles “Men with Guns”; “Paranoid” de John Duiganand ;“The Journey of

August King”; y las películas de Krzysztof Kieslowski “The Double Life of

Veronique”, “A Short Film About Killing” y “Blizna”, siendo esta última la

primera película que realizaron juntos.

Idziak nació en Polonia. Trabajó con el director Krzysztof Zanussi en 11

películas durante la década entre 1980 y principios de 1990. Las más recientes

fueron “The Year of the Quiet Sun” y “Wherever You Are…”

Entre filmación y filmación, Idziak enseña cursos de cinematografía en

distintas escuelas alrededor del mundo.

STUART CRAIG (Diseñador de Producción) es uno de los diseñadores

de producción más galardonados de la industria del cine. Tres veces ganó el

premio de la Academia y dos veces el de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine

y Televisión (BAFTA). Craig fue diseñador de producción de todas las películas

de Harry Potter. Fue candidato al Oscar por su trabajo en “Harry Potter and the

Sorcerer’s Stone” y más recientemente por “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”,

por la cual ganó el Premio de la BAFTA. Además, él fue postulado para el

premio de la BAFTA por cada una de las películas anteriores de Harry Potter.

Craig ganó su primer Premio de la Academia por su trabajo en la

aclamada película biográfica de Richard Attenborough, “Gandhi”. Volvió a

ganar otro Premio de la Academia, por la película de Stephen Frear, “Dangerous

Liaisons” y por la de Anthony Minghella, “The English Patient”. Fue postulado

para el Oscar por el diseño de producción para la película de David Lynch, “The

Elephant Man”, con la cual fue galardonado con su primer premio BAFTA, y

volvió a ser candidato al mismo premio por su trabajo en las películas “The

Mission” de Roland Joffe y “Chaplin” de Attenborough. Craig fue listado para

 

 

los premios de la BAFTA por todas las películas antes mencionadas, y también

por “Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes” de Hugh Hudson.

Craig y el director Richard Attenborough trabajaron muchos años juntos,

y su trabajo al principio fue como director de arte en “A Bridge Too Far”.

Continuando como equipo creativo, Craig pasó a ser diseñador de producción de

las películas de Attenborough “Cry Freedom”, “Shadowlands” e “In Love and

War”, además de “Gandhi” y “Chaplin”.

Entre otros de los trabajos de Craig como diseñador de producción, están:

“The Legend of Bagger Vance” de Robert Redford, “Notting Hill” de Roger

Michell, “The Avengers”, “Mary Reilly” de Stephen Frears, “The Secret Garden”

de Agnieszka Holland, “Memphis Belle” y “Cal”. Al principio de su carrera

Craig fue director de arte para la película de Richard Donner, “Superman”.

MARK DAY (Editor) ha ganado premios de montaje, y hace ya largo

tiempo que trabaja con el director David Yates. El año pasado, Day fue postulado

a los premios Emmy por el montaje de la película para televisión “The Girl in the

Cafè”, dirigida por Yates. En el año 2005, ganó el premio Televisivo de la

Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) además del Premio

de la Sociedad Real de Televisión (RTS) al Mejor Editor, por su trabajo en el

telefilm dirigido por Yates, “Sex Traffic”. El año anterior, había Ganado el

Premio de la BAFTA y una nominación al RTS, por su trabajo en la miniserie

“State of Play”, dirigida por Yates.

Por su trabajo de montaje en todas las películas dirigidas por Yates, Day

fue candidato a los premios de la RTS y el de la BAFTA por la miniserie “The

Way We Live Now”, y fue nuevamente listado al premio de la RTS por el telefilm

“The Young Visitors”. Day también trabajó con Yates en la miniseries “The Sins”,

y en el cortometraje “Rank”.

Day ha hecho varios trabajos con otros varios directores, entre ellos David

Blair para su película “Mystics”, y en los filmes para televisión “Anna Karenina”,

 

 

“Split Second” y “Donovan Quick”; Paul Greengrass en la película “The Theory

of Flight” y el telefilme “The Fix”; y John Schlesinger en los filmes para televisión

“The Tale of Sweeney Todd”, “Cold Comfort Farm” y “A Question of

Attribution”.

Otros trabajos de Day para televisión que cabe mencionar son las películas

de Farino “Flesh and Blood”, de Paul Seed “Murder Rooms”, de Richard Eyre

“Suddenly Last Summer” y de Jack Clayton “Memento Mori”, esta última por la

cual fue candidato al premio Televisivo de la BAFTA.

NICHOLAS HOOPER (Compositor) hace ya largo tiempo que trabaja

conjuntamente con el director David Yates, y vuelve a hacerlo ahora en “

““H

HHa

aar

rrr

rry

yy

P

PPo

oot

ttt

tte

eer

rr a

aan

nnd

dd t

tth

hhe

ee O

OOr

rrd

dde

eer

rr o

oof

ff t

tth

hhe

ee P

PPh

hho

ooe

een

nni

iix

xx”

””.

.. Hooper ganó el Premio Televisivo de la

Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA) a la Mejor Música

Original, por la película para televisión de Yates “The Young Visitors”. Otros

trabajos que realizó para Yates le valieron nominaciones al premio Televisivo de

la BAFTA a la Mejor Música Original, por los telefilms “The Way We Live Now”

y “The Girl in the Café”, y por la serie “State of Play”. Hooper volvió a formar

equipo con Yates para la película “The Tichborne Claimant”, y también para los

cortometrajes “Punch” y “Good Looks”.

Recientemente Hooper ganó el Premio Televisivo de la BAFTA TV a la

Mejor Música Original por el film para televisión “Prime Suspect – The Final

Act”, dirigido por Philip Martin, y protagonizado por Helen Mirren.

Anteriormente ya había trabajado con Martin en el telefilm “Bloodlines”.

Hooper compuso la música para una gran cantidad de películas,

programas de televisión y documentales. Entre sus trabajos reciente, está la

música de “The Heart of Me”, protagonizada por Helena Bonham Carter; y la de

las películas para televisión “The Best Man”, “The Chatterley Affair”, “My

Family and Other Animals” y “Messiah: The Promise”. Fue Hooper quien

 

 

escribió la música del documental “Land of the Tiger”, y para múltiples

episodios de la serie Nature” de National Geographic.

TIM BURKE (Supervisor de efectos visuales) fue candidato al premio de

la Academia y al de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión

(BAFTA) por su trabajo como Supervisor de Efectos Visuales en “Harry Potter

and the Prisoner of Azkaban”. La película, además ganó el Premio a los Efectos

Visuales sobresalientes en una Película con Efectos Visuales que Conducen a la

Acción, otorgado por la Sociedad de Efectos Visuales. Burke también fue el

Supervisor de efectos visuales en las películas de Harry Potter “Harry Potter and

the Chamber of Secrets” y “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Burke tiene 20 años de experiencia en el campo de efectos visuales en

películas, y previamente había ganado un Premio de la Academia, y había sido

postulado para el premio de la BAFTA, como parte del equipo de efectos

visuales en la gran película de Ridley Scott, “Gladiator”. El especialista, ya había

trabajado con Ridley Scott como supervisor de efectos visuales en “Black Hawk

Down” y en “Hannibal”.

Burke también fue el supervisor de efectos visuales en “A Knight’s Tale”,

y supervisor de efectos digitales en “Enemy of the State”. Algunos de sus otros

trabajos pudieron verse en “Babe: Pig in the City” y “Still Crazy”, y en las

películas para televisión “Merlin” y “The Mill on the Floss”.

JANY TEMIME (Diseñadora de vestuario) por tercera vez vuelve a las

películas Harry Potter, tras haber trabajado en “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of

Azkaban” y “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire”.

Recientemente Temime fue la vestuarista de la película de Alfonso Puaron

“Children of Men”, protagonizada por Clive Owen; y también en “Copying

Beethoven” de Agnieszka Holland, con el primer actor Ed Harris. Entre sus

últimos trabajos, cabe mencionar filmes tan diversos como “Bridget Jones: The

 

 

Edge of Reason” de Beeban Kidron, con Renee Zellweger; “Invincible” de

Werner Herzog’s, protagonizada por Tim Roth; y la película de Mel Smith “High

Heels and Low Lifes”, con la estrella Minnie Driver, por la cual la diseñadora fue

postulada al premio British Independent Film. Anteriormente, Temime ganó el

premio de la organización galesa BAFTA Cymru, por sus diseños de vestuario en

la película de Marc Evans “House of America”, y en 1995 ganó el Ternero de Oro

en el muy Holandés Festival de Cine de Utrecht, al Mejor Vestuario, para la

película de Marleen Gorris, “Antonia’s Line”, ganadora del Oscar a la Mejor

Película Extranjera.

En este momento Temime está trabajando para la película del director

Martin McDonagh, “In Bruges”, protagonizada por Ralph Fiennes y Colin

Farrell. La diseñadora ha realizado el vestuario para más de 40 películas

internacionales y programas de televisión. Entre sus muchos trabajos, cabe

mencionar: “Resistance” de Todd Komarnicki; “The Luzhin Defense” de Marleen

Gorris; “Gangster No. 1” de Paul McGuigan; “Rancid Aluminum” de Ed

Thomas; “The Character” de Mike van Diem, ganadora del Oscar 1998 a la Mejor

Película Extranjera; “The Ball” de Danny Deprez; “The Commissioner” y

“Crimetime” de George Sluizer; “All Men Are Mortal” de Ate de Jong; “The Last

Call” de Frans Weisz, entre otras.

NICK DUDMAN (Diseñador de Criaturas y Maquillaje para Efectos

Especiales) y su equipo han creado los efectos de maquillaje y las mágicas

criaturas de animación electrónica (animatronic) de todas las películas de la saga

Harry Potter. Su trabajo en cada una de las películas fue postulado para los

premios de la Academia Británica de Artes de Cine y Televisión (BAFTA).

Dudman empezó en el cine, como aprendiz del artista de maquillaje

británico Stuart Freeborn, trabajando en el maestro Jedi, Yoda, en la película

“Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back”. Tras cuatro años de práctica

con Freeborn, le pidieron a Dudman que encabezara el laboratorio inglés de

 

 

maquillaje para la película de Ridley Scott, “Legend”. Tras ello, trabajó

realizando el maquillaje y las prótesis para películas tales como “Mona Lisa”,

“Labyrinth”, “Willow”, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade”, “Batman”,

“Alien3” e “Interview with the Vampire”, entre otras.

En 1995, su carrera profesional se extendió hacia al área de animación

electrónica (animatronics). La creación de criaturas de gran tamaño comenzó

cuando le encargaron supervisar el departamento de 55 hombres criaturas para

la película de Luc Besson film “The Fifth Element”, por la cual ganó el premio de

la BAFTA a los Efectos Visuales. Desde entonces, él ha dirigido los

departamentos de criaturas y efectos de maquillaje en varios sonados éxitos de

taquilla como “Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace”, “The Mummy” y

“The Mummy Returns”. También fue asesor para los efectos para vestuario en

“Batman Begins”. Recientemente Dudman diseñó los animatronics para la

película de Alfonso Cuarón, “Children of Men”. En el año 2007, ganó el Premio

Genie a logros especiales de la Academia Canadiense, por el maquillaje de

“Beowulf and Grendel”.Además, la compañía de Dudman, Pigs Might Fly, crea y

comercializa sangre que no mancha.

 

 

 

WARNER BROS. PICTURES Presents

A HEYDAY FILMS Production

 

 

CAST

IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE

 

Harry Potter ........................................................................... DANIEL RADCLIFFE

Dudley Dursley ...........................................................................HARRY MELLING

Piers.................................................................................................. JASON BOYD

Malcolm ..................................................................................RICHARD MACKLIN

Mrs. Arabella Figg .................................................................. KATHRYN HUNTER

TV Weatherman ................................................................................. MILES JUPP

Petunia Dursley .................................................................................FIONA SHAW

Vernon Dursley....................................................................RICHARD GRIFFITHS

Mafalda Hopkirk................................................................. JESSICA STEVENSON

James Potter............................................................................. ADRIAN RAWLINS

Lily Potter.....................................................................GERALDINE SOMERVILLE

Cedric Diggory.....................................................................ROBERT PATTINSON

Lord Voldemort............................................................................RALPH FIENNES

Nymphadora Tonks........................................................................NATALIA TENA

Alastor 'Mad-Eye' Moody..................................................... BRENDAN GLEESON

Kingsley Shacklebolt .................................................................GEORGE HARRIS

Elphias Doge ......................................................................PETER CARTWRIGHT

Emmeline Vance ...................................................................BRIDGETTE MILLAR

Sirius Black....................................................................................GARY OLDMAN

Arthur Weasley............................................................................MARK WILLIAMS

Remus Lupin................................................................................ DAVID THEWLIS

Minerva McGonagall......................................................................MAGGIE SMITH

Mrs. Weasley...............................................................................JULIE WALTERS

Kreacher................................................................................TIMOTHY BATESON

Hermione Granger........................................................................EMMA WATSON

Ron Weasley ................................................................................ RUPERT GRINT

Fred Weasley................................................................................ JAMES PHELPS

George Weasley..........................................................................OLIVER PHELPS

Ginny Weasley ...........................................................................BONNIE WRIGHT

Newspaper Vendor.....................................................................JAMIE WOLPERT

Bob ........................................................................................... NICHOLAS BLANE

Voice of Lift................................................................................ DAISY HAGGARD

 

 

 

Cornelius Fudge..........................................................................ROBERT HARDY

Lucius Malfoy................................................................................. JASON ISAACS

Percy Weasley................................................................................CHRIS RANKIN

Albus Dumbledore .................................................................. MICHAEL GAMBON

Dolores Umbridge.................................................................. IMELDA STAUNTON

Amelia Bones...................................................................................SIAN THOMAS

Draco Malfoy..................................................................................... TOM FELTON

Vincent Crabbe............................................................................JAMIE WAYLETT

Gregory Goyle .............................................................................JOSH HERDMAN

Cho Chang........................................................................................KATIE LEUNG

Neville Longbottom....................................................................MATTHEW LEWIS

Luna Lovegood............................................................................ EVANNA LYNCH

Slightly Creepy Boy ........................................................................RYAN NELSON

Argus Filch...................................................................................DAVID BRADLEY

Seamus Finnigan........................................................................DEVON MURRAY

Nigel 2nd Year..........................................................................WILLIAM MELLING

Professor Grubbly-Plank ................................................................APPLE BROOK

Severus Snape ............................................................................. ALAN RICKMAN

Sybil Trelawney .......................................................................EMMA THOMPSON

Dean Thomas .............................................................................. ALFRED ENOCH

Padma Patil .................................................................................... AFSHAN AZAD

Parvati Patil...................................................................... SHEFALI CHOWDHURY

Filius Flitwick...............................................................................WARWICK DAVIS

Barman............................................................................................JIM McMANUS

Somewhat Doubtful Boy..................................................................... NICK SHIRM

Everard ........................................................................................... SAM BEAZLEY

Phineas....................................................................................JOHN ATTERBURY

Bellatrix Lestrange....................................................HELENA BONHAM CARTER

Rubeus Hagrid....................................................................... ROBBIE COLTRANE

Azkaban Death Eater ........................................................ARBEN BAJRAKTARAJ

Dawlish .......................................................................................... RICHARD LEAF

Grawp ........................................................................................TONY MAUDSLEY

Young Severus Snape...................................................................ALEC HOPKINS

Young James Potter....................................................................ROBERT JARVIS

Young Sirius Black ....................................................................JAMES WALTERS

Young Peter Pettigrew............................................................CHARLES HUGHES

Young Remus Lupin ................................................................... JAMES UTECHIN

Centaurs ...................................................... JASON PIPER, MICHAEL WILDMAN

Death Eaters..................................................RICHARD CUBISON, PETER BEST

TAV MACDOUGALL, RICHARD TRINDER

Stunt Coordinator ..........................................................................GREG POWELL

Stunt Performers .......................................DAVID HOLMES, BRADLEY FARMER

NICK CHOPPING, MARC MAILLEY, GEORGE COTTLE

JO WHITNEY, TOLGA KENAN, ROWLEY IRLAM

ANDY SMART, GORDON SEED, MAURICE LEE

ROB INCH, SARAH FRANZL, JAMES GROGAN

NICHOLAS DAINES, SCOTT BRADY

MATTHEW STIRLING, DANIEL NAPROUS

MIKE LAMBERT, MARK ARCHER, RICK ENGLISH

TINA MASKELL, PAUL LOWE, KIM McGARRITY

ROY TAYLOR, LUCY ALLEN, RYAN NEWBERRY

RHYS HENSON, ANTHONY KNIGHT

LEE HORNBLOWER, CHARLIE BILLSON

KELLY ATTFIELD, MARTIN BAYFIELD

 

 

 

FILMMAKERS

 

Directed by........................................................................................DAVID YATES

Screenplay by................................................................MICHAEL GOLDENBERG

Produced by.................................................................................. DAVID HEYMAN

 

DAVID BARRON

Based on the novel by ..................................................................... J.K. ROWLING

Executive Producer .................................................................... LIONEL WIGRAM

Director of Photography........................................................... SLAWOMIR IDZIAK

Production Designer ......................................................................STUART CRAIG

Edited by................................................................................................MARK DAY

Co-Producer ..................................................................................... JOHN TREHY

Score Composed by ............................................................. NICHOLAS HOOPER

Visual Effects Supervisor......................................................................TIM BURKE

Costume Designer...........................................................................JANY TEMIME

Casting by...........................................................................................FIONA WEIR

Unit Production Manager & Associate Producer...................................TIM LEWIS

Second Unit Director ................................................... STEPHEN WOOLFENDEN

First Assistant Director ................................................................. CLIFF LANNING

Production Manager .................................................................. SIMON EMANUEL

Production Manager Second Unit ............................................. RUSSELL LODGE

Special Effects Supervisor.................................................... JOHN RICHARDSON

Creature & Make-Up Effects Designer ........................................... NICK DUDMAN

Director of Photography, Second Unit.......................................MIKE BREWSTER

Visual Effects Producer................................................................EMMA NORTON

Visual Effects Supervisor.................................................................. CHRIS SHAW

Model Unit Supervisor .................................................................. JOSÉ GRANELL

Supervising Sound Editor............................................................JAMES MATHER

Supervising Art Director................................................................... NEIL LAMONT

Set Decorator.................................................................... STEPHENIE McMILLAN

Animals Supervisor.............................................................................GARY GERO

Head of Harry Potter Production Publicity................................VANESSA DAVIES

Post Production Supervisor......................................................KATIE REYNOLDS

Key Second Assistant Director.................................................MATTHEW SHARP

Script Supervisor ...........................................................................ANNA WORLEY

Construction Manager.......................................................................PAUL HAYES

Senior Art Director.....................................................ANDREW ACKLAND-SNOW

Art Directors................................MARK BARTHOLOMEW, ALASTAIR BULLOCK

 

MARTIN SCHADLER, GARY TOMKINS, ALEX WALKER

Art Department Coordinator ........................................................JODIE JACKMAN

On Set Art Directors ......................................MARTIN FOLEY, STEPHEN SWAIN

Draughtsmen ........................... JULIA DEHOFF, MOLLY HUGHES, EMMA VANE

Junior Draughtsmen ...............................................................ANDREW BENNETT

 

GARY JOPLING, HATTIE STOREY

Specialist Researcher.................................................................. CELIA BARNETT

Archivist .........................................................................................CHRIS LUNNEY

Storyboard Artists .....................................................JIM CORNISH, JANE CLARK

NICK PELHAM, DENIS RICH

Prop Conceptual Artist....................................................... MIRAPHORA CARUSO

Graphic Artist................................................................................EDUARDO LIMA

Conceptual Artists ................................................................................ ROB BLISS

ADAM BROCKBANK, ANDREW WILLIAMSON

Art Department Assistants.........................................................ASHLEY LAMONT

MATTHEW KERLY, ROSE WINDSOR

Production Buyer .....................................................................LUCINDA STURGIS

Assistant Production Buyer ....................................................... ROSIE GOODWIN

Home Economist ............................................................................MARY LUTHER

 

 

Drapesmaster .............................................................................. GARY HANDLEY

Drapes Supervisor..........................................................................DAN HANDLEY

Property Master ......................................................................BARRY WILKINSON

Assistant Property Master ...........................................................BEN WILKINSON

Supervising Modeller ............................................................... PIERRE BOHANNA

2nd Assistant Directors......... ROB BURGESS, JANE BURGESS, BEN LANNING

3rd Assistant Directors ........................................ NICK SIMMONDS, ALI MORRIS

Key Set Production Assistant .............................................................NICK STARR

A Camera Operator & Steadicam.................................................. JEREMY HILES

B Camera Operator .............................................................. WOJCIECH STARON

1st Assistant Camera ........................................ KIM SEBER, HENRYK JEDYNAK

2nd Assistant Camera ...................... TOM McFARLING, FRANCESCO FERRARI

FIONN COMERFORD, GERRY CONWAY

Key Grip............................................................................STEVE ELLINGWORTH

Grips .................................................................... DAVID WELLS, PAUL WORLEY

Crane & Head Technician Grip.................................................ANDY THOMPSON

Gaffer..........................................................................................JAMES McGUIRE

Rigging Gaffer.................................................................................DAVID RIDOUT

Best Boys........................STEWART MONTEITH, JOHN MARTIN O'FLATHARTA

Key Grip Electricians............LIAM MAGILL, IAN GLENISTER, BARRY CONROY

Rigging Best Boy ................................................................................ SAM BLOOR

Grip Electricians .........................DAVID MAYES, NIAL MONROE, GEOFF READ

GARY NOLAN, GRAEME HAUGHTON, IWAN WILLIAMS

AL WATSON, CHRIS GILBERTSON, JACK RIDOUT

ELLIOT THOMAS, PAUL WOOD, MARK LAIDLAW

STEVE POWTON, PATRICK O'FLYNN, TONY SKINNER

JIM KNOX, GRAHAM O'DRISCOL, ROSS SLATER

BOB DIEBELIUS, MARK LOOKER, MICHAEL WHITE

JAMIE HENNEY, STEVE MATHIE, JACK WHITE

Stills Photography.............................. MURRAY CLOSE, TAYLOR TULIP-CLOSE

Video Playback Coordinator............................................................BOB BRIDGES

Video Playback Operator..........................................................STUART BRIDGES

Production Sound Mixer.............................................................STUART WILSON

Boom Operator ................................................................................ORIN BEATON

Sound Assistant...................................................................................MITCH LOW

Producers' Coordinator........................................................................ ANNA HALL

Assistant to Mr. Yates.................................................................JAMIE WOLPERT

Assistant to Mr. Heyman ..................................................... GERALDINE PATTEN

Assistant to Mr. Barron...........................................................ANDREW T. SURRY

Supervising Location Manager............................................................ SUE QUINN

Unit Location Managers.................................................JOSEPH JAYAWARDENA

MARK SOMNER, STEVE HARVEY

Assistant Location Managers ....................AURELIA THOMAS, PIPPA BULLOCK

First Assistant Editors................................................................ HERMIONE BYRT

TANIA CLARKE, DEBORAH RICHARDSON

Assistant Editor.................................................................................... ALEX FENN

2nd Assistant Editors...........................................TOM KEMPLEN, MARK CULLIS

Visual Effects Editor ............................................................................MATT GLEN

Visual Effects Assistant Editor....................................................... TOBIAS LLOYD

Sound Designer...........................................................................ANDY KENNEDY

Co-Sound Designer ........................................................................ JAMES BOYLE

Sound Effects Editors........DOMINIC GIBBS, JON OLIVE, JETHRO LOUGHRAN

Dialogue Editor............................................................BJØRN OLE SCHROEDER

ADR Editor..........................................................................................DAN LAURIE

Assistant Dialogue Editor ....................................................... STEVEN BROWELL

Foley Supervisor..............................................................................DEREK TRIGG

Foley Editor......................................................................................VANESA TATE

 

 

 

Foley Artists.......................................................PETER BURGIS, ANDI DERRICK

ANDREA KING, PAUL ACKERMAN

Assistant Sound Editors ...................................................... GEMMA NICHOLSON

ALISTAIR HAWKINS, AMY FELTON

Re-recording Mixers ...................................................MIKE PRESTWOOD SMITH

MARK TAYLOR, DOUG COOPER

Foley Mixers .................................................. EDWARD COLYER, NIGEL HEATH

Supervising Digital Colourist........................................................... PETER DOYLE

DI Operations Supervisor ....................................................................GRACE LAN

Lead Digital Colourist ...................................................................GABRIEL DEDIC

Additional Post Production Supervisor .......................................... JESSIE THIELE

Post Production Secretary...........................................................CHERRI ARPINO

Post Production Assistants...........................................................STEVEN MATES

LUKE O'CONNELL, OLLY YOUNG

Costume Supervisor......................................................GRAHAM CHURCHYARD

Assistant Costume Designers .................... GUY SPERANZA, RICHARD DAVIES

SARA MEEK, VIVIENNE JONES, CHLOE AUBRY

Wardrobe Supervisor........................................................... GEORGINA GUNNER

Wardrobe Master.............................................................................NEIL MURPHY

Wardrobe Mistresses......................................SALLY PUTTICK, HELEN JEROME

Wardrobe.................................................WILLIAM STEGGLE, SUNNY ROWLEY

RUPERT STEGGLE, DAVE EVANS

Costume Coordinator ......................................................... BIRGITTA FREDLUND

Costumiers..............................................................TIM SHANAHAN, STEVE KILL

MAURICIO CARNEIRO, MICHELLE GISONDA

ROSY COPPOLA, SUSAN BRADBEAR

SHARON McCORMACK, GARY PAGE

JO VAN SCHUPPEN, FRANK SIMON

ANGELA PLEDGE, CHRISTINA REX

CLAIRE KITCHENER, MARTIN McSHANE

RACHEL DIXON, JANE BOGUNOVIC

SHELLY HAZELL, JANE FLANAGAN

SUSAN MacKENZIE, DAVID McLAUGHLIN

KAREN MITCHELL, NICK ROCHE-GORDON

YVONNE OTZEN, SHIRLEY NEVIN

CAT LOVETT, FRANÇOISE FOURCADE

EMMA WALKER, DEREK CLARK

Make-Up Designer..................................................................... AMANDA KNIGHT

Make-Up Artists...................................................................LYNDA ARMSTRONG

BELINDA HODSON, SHARON NICHOLAS

Assistant Make-Up Artist ....................................................... GRACE BREWSTER

Hair Designer............................................................................... COLIN JAMISON

Key Hairdresser................................................................................JAN JAMISON

Hairdressers ......................... TRACEY SMITH, LISA TOMBLIN, HILARY HAINES

Assistant Hairdresser ..................................................... CHARLOTTE HAYWARD

Production Coordinator..............................................................WINNIE WISHART

Assistant Production Coordinators ................................................. VICKY BISHOP

TONY DAVIS, ALEX KLIEN

Stunt Secretary..............................................................................JADE GORDON

Set Assistants..............................................................ADAM BYLES, EILEEN YIP

RACHAEL TOTTINGHAM, HANNAH MOORMAN

ANDY MADDEN, GARETH LEWIS

VALENTINA BORFECCHIA, ED SYMON

Production Assistants.................................... KATIE BYLES, TOM EDMONDSON

MARIA PUDLOWSKA, CLAIRE DUNN

ESTHER BINTLIFF, ANDY ELLINAS, TAMARA KING

Production Accountant ......................................................................GARY NIXON

 

 

Department Accountant...................................................................NICKY COATS

Assistant Accountants...........................................DILIP PATEL, NICHOLA KERR

JAY ROSENWINK, JACKY HOLDING

PAULA SARGEANT, ALASTAIR McNEIL

JAYNE BARTON, LOUISE VAN HAMME

LINDA TAYLOR, HELEN GLOVER

Special Effects Assistant Supervisor...................................STEPHEN HAMILTON

Special Effects Main Unit Floor Supervisor.....................................RICKY FARNS

Special Effects Supervising Engineers.....................................BRIAN MORRISON

NIGEL BRACKLEY, DAVID HUNTER

MARK BULLIMORE, MIKE DURKAN

Special Effects Coordinator.................................................ROSIE RICHARDSON

Special Effects Buyer .....................................................................PETER ASTON

Special Effects Senior Technicians....................TERRY BRIDLE, JOHN MORRIS

FRANK GUINEY, DIGBY MILNER

PAUL TAYLOR, PETER PICKERING

PAUL STEPHENSON, PAUL WHYBROW

STEVE CULLANE, ROBBIE SCOTT

Special Effects Technicians................................................ JONATHAN BULLOCK

MARCUS RICHARDSON, LEE PHELAN

RONNIE DURKAN, KEVIN WESCOTT

JOHN PILGRIM, PHOEBE TAIT, CHRIS GILES

MATT HARLOW, MATT WOOD, BEN PHILLIPS

HELENA BRACKLEY, ANDY WARNER

DEMI DEMETRIOU, JONATHON BARRASS

Special Effects Flying Wire Coordinator..........................................KEVIN WELCH

Special Effects Flying Wire Technician.............................................ALAN PEREZ

Make-Up & Creature Effects Coordinator..................................... JENNY WEIGHT

Make-Up & Creature Effects Buyer ..............................................JOHN LAMBERT

Supervising Sculptor................................................................... JULIAN MURRAY

Fabrication Supervisor.................................................................... JANET BURNS

Key Prosthetic Make-Up Artists......................................................PAUL SPATERI

SHAUNE HARRISON, MARK COULIER

Key Mould Makers...............................................MEL COLEMAN, JAMIE IOVINO

Animatronic Model Designers............................. PHIL ASHTON, CHRIS BARTON

JOSH LEE, ESTEBAN MENDOZA

JIMMY SANDYS, JOE SCOTT, STEVE WRIGHT

Fabricators..................................................... GEMMA DE VECCHI, LOUISE DAY

Mould Makers..............................................BARRY FOWLER, TAMZIN SMYTHE

TERRY SIBLEY, CHRIS KEAREY

HELEN WILSON, MARTYN FOWLER

Prosthetic Make-Up Artists..............................PAULA EDEN, DUNCAN JARMAN

BARNEY NIKOLIC, STEPHEN MURPHY

Art Finishers..................................................................................... JENI WALKER

ANDREA HOCHGATTERER, TRACEY O'BRIEN

Sculptors.......................................................................KATE HILL, LUKE FISHER

CHRIS FITZGERALD, DAN WOODLEY

MAX PATTE, ANDREW HUNT, COLIN JACKMAN

Assistant Construction Manager................................................ DAVID WESCOTT

Construction Coordinator.........................................................AMANDA PETTETT

Construction Buyer ........................................................................ GARRY HAYES

HOD Carpenter................................................................................ JOHN KIRSOP

HOD Metal Worker ....................................................................... KEVIN NUGENT

HOD Scenic Painter ....................................................................PAUL WESCOTT

HOD Plasterer ..............................................................................PAUL TAGGART

HOD Rigger ............................................................ STEVE 'GINGER' McCARTHY

HOD Stagehand ........................................................................ GRAHAM BLINCO

 

 

HOD Construction Electrician........................................................... ANDY EVANS

HOD Letter & Décor Artist ........................................................STEVE HEDINGER

Letter and Décor Artist...............................................................FRANCIS MARTIN

HOD Scenic Artist...................................................................MARCUS WILLIAMS

Scenic Artists...........................................MATT WALKER, STEVE SALLYBANKS

HOD Sculptor....................................................................................BRYN COURT

Construction Supervisors .........................LAURENCE BURNS, DAVID WHYMAN

DAVID PERSCHKY, MALCOLM FOSTER

PETER STEPHENSON, PAUL WHITELOCK

TREVOR EVE, MARTIN MORAN

ALAN HOPKINS, CLIVE GOBLE

SIMON DUTTON, CHRISTOPHER HEDGES

Construction Chargehands................................. JAMIE GAMBLIN, DAVID KELLY

BRIAN NEIGHBOUR, STAN LATTIMORE

STEVE CLARK, MICHAEL WESCOTT

DAVID LAINSBURY, STEVE BROWN

ERNIE HALL, GARY WALKER

DAVID JONES, SIMON CULLEN

Construction Standbys ....................................... PETER MANN, TOMMY LOWEN

PAUL DUNCAN, SEAN HIGGINS

BRIAN STACHINI, WILL STICKLEY

ROB WELLER, BRIAN HARTNOLL

IAN MURPHY, PAUL DAVIES, MARTIN BROWN

Property Storeman ....................................................................PAUL CHEESMAN

Chargehand Dressing Propmen........................................................MICKY MILLS

PAUL BURGESS, CHRISTIAN SHORT

Dressing Propmen............................................................................MATT COOKE

RON HIGGINS, BARRY ARNOLD

GARY DAWSON, GERRY O'CONNOR

JIM SKIPSEY, SYDNEY WILSON

Supervising Standby Propman............................................... SIMON WILKINSON

Chargehand Standby Propman Second Unit ............................. MARCUS SMART

Standby Propmen............................................ GARY IXER, SONNY MERCHANT

Assistant Supervising Modeller ......................................................JOHN WELLER

Senior Modellers.......................................... ADRIAN GETLEY, TRACEY CURTIS

Modellers...............................JIM BARR, PAUL KNIGHT, JONATHAN JACKSON

CHRISTOPHER ELDRIDGE, HANNAH BIGGS

TIFFANY WOODS, STEVE WOTHERSPOON

Junior Modellers ................................. CATRIONA MacCANN, VICTORIA HAYES

Prop Manufacturing Buyer.......................................................STUART MERIDEW

Animals by.....................................................................BIRDS AND ANIMALS UK

Head Animal Trainers.........................................JULIE TOTTMAN, DAVE SOUSA

Assistant Animal Trainers...........................................................MATT PATCHING

DONNA McCORMICK-SMITH

LEANNE HUBBARD

CAROLINE BENOIST

HAMISH SECRETT

Choreographers Wand Combat .................................. PAUL HARRIS, NICK GOH

Unit Doctor................................................................................DR. IAN FURBANK

Unit Nurses....................................................................................LESLEY QUINN

KAREN FAYERTY, LAURA WILLIAMS

Casting Assistants...................................ALICE SEARBY, CHARLIE MacMILLAN

Unit Publicist.............................................................................AMY ROBERTSON

Transport Coordinator .......................................................... DAVID ROSENBAUM

Transport Captain.......................................................................EDDIE COLEMAN

Assistant Transport Captains ............VIVIENNE ROSENBAUM, STEVE GRIGGS

Production Administrators ...........................DANIEL DARK, OLIVER GREETHAM

 

 

Catering Managers ................................................................ ROBIN DEMETRIOU

 

ALAN SPRINGFIELD, PETER BARTON

Safety Coordinator.......................................................................JAKE EDMONDS

Safety Advisors.................... JASON CURTIS, LARRY EYDMANN, LEAH CHALK

Leading Fire Fighters........................................STEVE SCRACE, MICK HOLTOM

Location Security...........................................................................TONY DENHAM

Set Security ......................................................... RESHAD ESMAIL, KEN BURRY

Weather Consultant............................................................. DR. RICHARD WILDE

 

SECOND UNIT

First Assistant Directors......................... DOMINIC FYSH, JAMIE CHRISTOPHER

LEE TAILOR, PAUL TAYLOR

Second Assistant Director......................................................LYNDSAY ROGERS

Third Assistant Director ....................................................................... JANE RYAN

Set Assistants...................................SAM HAVELAND, CLAIRE COLLINGRIDGE

DARREN O'CONNELL, AMY STARES

ALEX JORDAN, PHILLIPPA HUNT

KATIE NEAL, PAUL BRENNAN

TOM BROWNE, SOPHIE EASTON

CRAIG TOPHAM, DANIEL SMITH

Production Coordinators.........................KATE GARBETT, NATASHA GORMLEY

Production Assistant.......................................................................... HOLLY SALE

Additional Second Unit Photography................................ STEFAN STANKOWSKI

NIC MILNER

Steadicam Operator ....................................................................PAUL EDWARDS

C Camera Operator......................................................................PETER VERSEY

First Assistant Camera ..........................JOHN FERGUSON, MARC ATHERFOLD

CLIVE MACKEY, MILES PROUDFOOT

Second Assistant Camera......................................RAY MEERE, DAVID MACKIE

MARTIN LEWIS, LUKE COULTER, ALFIE BIDDLE

Script Supervisor ................................................................ SHARON MANSFIELD

B Camera Script Supervisors ............................................................... LOU WADE

LAURAJANE MILES, KATIE HARLOW

Wardrobe Assistants ................................LAURENT GUINCI, STEPHANIE PAUL

Gaffer..................................................................................................WICK FINCH

Best Boy .....................................................................................TOM O'SULLIVAN

Best Boy Floor ................................................JOE BROWN, RICKY PATTENDEN

Grip Electricians ...............................................JAMES SMART, PERRY CULLEN

BEN KNIGHT, WILLIAM FINCH

WAYNE KING, AARON KEATING

IAN SINFIELD, ANDY MOUNTAIN

CHARLIE MUSPRATT, ANDY CHALLIS

Key Grip..................................................................................DARREN HOLLAND

B Camera Grips...........................................................DAVE CROSS, DAVE RIST

Grip...............................................................................................ANDY HOPKINS

Crane Technician ............................................................................. DAN BLUNDY

Head Technicians............................................DAVID FREETH, MARIO SPANNA

Crane Technician Grip........................................................... ADAM SAMUELSON

Special Effects Technicians............... STEPHEN HUTCHINSON, LUKE MURPHY

NICK JOSCELYNE, NOAH MEDDINGS

Hairdresser ................................................................................... ANDREA FINCH

Make-Up Artist................................................................................ NORMA WEBB

Sound Mixer......................................................................................JOHN CASALI

Boom Operators ............................................... GARY DODKIN, CHRIS MURPHY

Video Operator ............................................................................... DAN HARTLEY

Aerial Coordinator............................................................................ MARC WOLFF

 

 

Helicopter Pilot ........................................................................ WILL SAMUELSON

Wescam Operator ...............................................................................ADAM DALE

Wescam Technicians ..........................CHARLIE WOODBURN, GLYN WILLIAMS

Aerial Ground Safety .............................................. STEVE NORTH, TOM CLODE

 

Miniature Construction and Photography by.........CINESITE (EUROPE) LIMITED

Executive Producer ....................................................................... ANTONY HUNT

Model Unit Producer...................................................................BRENDA COXON

Director of Photography...........................................................NIGEL STONE BSC

Model Workshop Supervisor ..................................................NIGEL TREVESSEY

Model Unit 1st Assistant.............................................................DAVID PEARSON

Gaffer.............................................................................................JOHN ROGERS

HOD Rigger .................................................. DANNY WEBSTER, DOUG BISHOP

JENNY BOWES, ANDY BULL, INEZ BUNCLARK

ALEXANDRA COXON, MATTHEW D’ANGIBAU

NICHOLAS J. DAVIS, ROB DUNBAR, MIGUEL GRANELL

INÉS GRANELL, RONNIE GREEN, GARRY HEDGES JR.

CHARITY HOBBS-WOOD, GREG HORSWILL

JOHN LEE, LES McGEE, IAN MENZIES

KARL MORGAN, JOHN MURPHY, GEOFF NEWTON

MICHAEL PARKIN, ANDY PROCTOR

TERRY RICHARDS, NICK RICHARDSON

ADAM ROGERS, ALEX RUTHERFORD, BILL THOMAS

Head of Education ........................................................................... JANET WILLIS

Head of Crowd Tuition.........................................................................IAN HOSKIN

Department of Education....................................ADAM SLATTER, JANE RALLEY

PETER WRIGHT, CARMELINA WRIGHT

MAUREEN BOWEN, EITHNE BUCHANAN-BARROW

JO DRAKE, SUE ENOCH, ELLA GOODWIN

THERESA KELLY, WILMA KEPPEL, ANN LANIGAN

SHARON MILTON, PAT ODDY, CHRIS PITTSON

CHRIS PRING, DAWN SLATTER

MARI SMITH, JOHN TWIGG

Score Produced by...........................................................DARRELL ALEXANDER

Music Conducted by.....................................................................ALASTAIR KING

Orchestra Leader.................................................................. MARCIA CRAYFORD

Orchestrations ............................................ ALASTAIR KING, JULIAN KERSHAW

GEOFF ALEXANDER, SIMON WHITESIDE

BRADLEY MILES

Assistant Music Supervisor ..................................................... RICHARD NELSON

Supervising Music Editor..........................................................GRAHAM SUTTON

Music Editors ..........................................SOPHIE CORNET, ROBIN WHITTAKER

Score Programmer.......................................................................ALLAN JENKINS

Music Performed by................................. CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF LONDON

Music Recorded & Mixed at.............................................ABBEY ROAD STUDIOS

Music Recorded & Mixed by..........................................................PETER COBBIN

Assistant Music Mixer..........................................................................SAM OKELL

Choir ................................................................................................ RSVP VOICES

Music Copying & Librarians...........................ROBERT SNEDDON, DAVID HAGE

Scanning & Recording.............................................................................CINESITE

Titles by .....................................................................................FOREIGN OFFICE

End Credits by.....................................................................................CAPITAL FX

Visual Effects Producer ..........................................................THERESA CORRAO

Additional Visual Effects Supervision ...........................................GAVIN TOOMEY

Senior Visual Effects Coordinator ................................................... LAYA ARMIAN

Visual Effects Coordinators..................................................RICHARD YEOMANS

 

 

SARAH L. SMITH, NICHOLAS ATKINSON

Assistant Visual Effects Coordinator ................................SHELLY LLOYD-JAMES

Visual Effects Compositor ....................................................... SIMON BURCHELL

Visual Effects Pre-visualisation Artist .............................. ANTHONY ZWARTOUW

Visual Effects Match Move Technician.....................................MIKE WOODHEAD

 

Visual Effects by .................................................................... DOUBLE NEGATIVE

Visual Effects Supervisor............................................................. PAUL FRANKLIN

Visual Effects Producer...............................................................DOMINIC SIDOLI

2D & 3D Supervisors ............................................................... EAMONN BUTLER,

JELENA STOJANOVIC, JOLENE McCAFFREY

JUSTIN MARTIN, RICHARD CLARKE

Lead Artists................................................... ADAM PASCHKE, ADRIAN PINDER

ANDREW WHITEHURST, CHRIS MANGNALL

COLIN McEVOY, DAVID VICKERY, DAYNE COWAN

EUGENIE VON TUNZELMANN, GED WRIGHT

GEORGE ZWIER, GRAHAM JACK, GUREL MEHMET

HEGE ANITA BERG, MARTIN PARSONS

MIKE NIXON, PAUL RAEBURN, PHIL JOHNSON

PHILIPPE LePRINCE, SANJU TRAVIS

STUART LOVE, SUSAN WEEKS, TOM ROLFE

TREVOR YOUNG, TRISTAN MYLES, TRINA M. RO

VICTOR WADE, BEN TAYLOR

Visual Effects Production............................. CLAUDIA DEHMEL, KATE PHILLIPS

MORIAH SPARKS, RICHARD DIVER

TRACEY LEADBETTER

Animation.......................................................... ANDY FRASER, AYSHA MADINA

CLARE WILLIAMS, CRAIG CRANE

DAVID LOWRY, ELIZABETH GRAY

MAURIZIO PARIMBELLI, MICHAEL HULL

NICK SYMONS, NICOLA BRODIE

PAUL CHARISSE, RUDY RAIJMAKERS

STAFFORD LAWRENCE, STEVE HOOGENDYK

STEWART ASH, TOM O'FLAHERTY, THOMAS WARD

Lighting .......................................ADRIAN THOMPSON, ALEXANDER KAMINSKI

ALEXANDER SEAMAN, ALISON WORTMAN

ANDREAS VRHOVSEK, ANDREW WARREN

ANDY BEAN, BECKY GRAHAM

BJORN HENRIKSSON, BRUNO BARON

CHANGEUI IM, DAMEON O'BOYLE

DAN WOOD, DAVID BASALLA

DELE MOMOH, DIEGO TRAZZI

DONNA LANASA, EMILY LORECA COBB

FAHRAN QURESHI, FERNANDA MORENO

FLORIAN HU, GAVIN HARRISON

GAWAIN LIDDIARD, HELENA MASAND

IMERY WATSON, JAMES BENSON

JAMES FURLONG, JAMES TOMLINSON

JAMIE BRIENS, JAMIE STEWART

JAMSHED SOORI, JAN NATARAJAN

JEREMY HARDIN, JEREMY SMITH

JOEL GREEN, JOHN KILSHAW

JON VEAL, JORDAN KIRK

JUAN-LUIS SANCHEZ, KARI BROWN

KATHERINE ROBERTS, LAURENT-PAUL ROBERT

LUCY WARD, MARIA GIANNAKOUROS

MARK MASSON, MARK WAINWRIGHT

 

 

MARKUS DRAYSS, MATTHEW SMITH

MAY LEUNG, MICHAEL WALTL

NEIL MILLER, NICOLA FONTANA

NICOLA HOYLE, NIKLAS JACOBSON

PATRICK ZENTIS, PAWEL GROCHOLA

PIERRE GRAGE, PIETER WARMINGTON

PIETRO PONTI, SCOTT COOPER

SIMON GUSTAFSSON, STEVEN MOORE

STUART FARLEY, TIMOTHY JONES

TOM GRIFFITHS, TYSON CROSS

UNNSTEIN GUDJONNSON, UZMA CURTIS

VANESSA BOYCE, VIKTOR RIETVELD

WAI IN LEONG, WILL ELSDALE

XAVIER ROIG, ZOE CRANLEY

Matchmovers ...................................................... ABRAHAM KAMBANOPOULOS

ANDRE BRAITHWAITE, AZZARD GORDON

CHANTELLE WILLIAMS, CHRIS UNG

DANIEL WAROM, DOMINIC CARUS

ELISENDA FAUSTINO DEU

EUGENE LIPKIN, HUW J. EVANS

JAMES EDWARD REID

JASON HUE, LUKE BAILEY

MARCELLO DA SILVA

MICHAEL ATKIN, NICOLA ATKINSON

RHYS SALCOMBE, SAM SCHWIER

SIMON PYNN, TOM RICHARDSON

TOM STEADMAN

Compositing..........................................ALASTAIR CRAWFORD, ALEX IRELAND

ALEXANDRA PAPAVRAMIDES

ALICE MITCHELL, ANDRE DD BRIZARD

ASTRID BUSSER-CASAS

BRIDGET M. TAYLOR, BRONWYN EDWARDS

CLAIRE INGLIS, DAN SNAPE

DAVI STEIN, DEBRA COLEMAN

EDWARD WILKIE, FOAD SHAH]

FRANK BERBERT, FRED PLACE

HELEN WOOD, IAN Z. SIMPSON

ISAAC LAYISH, JAMES ETHERINGTON

JAMES RUSSELL, JAN MAROSKE

JAUME ARTEMAN, JERRY HALL

JIM STEEL, JOHN J. GALLOWAY

JONATHAN BOWEN, JUDY BARR

JULIA REINHARD, JULIAN GNASS

LUKE LETKEY, MARCUS HINDBORG

MARK TRAN-TREMBLE, MATTHEW SHAW

MATTHEW TWYFORD, MICHAEL HARRISON

MIKE MARCUS, NIK BROWNLEE

OLIVER ATHERTON, PAUL BELLANY

PAUL CHAPMAN, PEDRO LARA

PETE HOWLETT, PHILIPP DANNER

RAFAL KANIEWSKI, RICHARD B. STAY

ROBIN BEARD, ROHIT GILL

SANDRA REIS, SARAH LOCKWOOD

SARAH SOULSBY, SCOTT PRITCHARD

SCOTT TAYLOR, SEAN STRANKS

SERENA LAM, SERGIO AYROSA

SHARON PENG, SIMON TRAFFORD

 

 

STEPHEN JAMES, TILMAN PAULIN

Rotoscope & Prep Artists ........................ ANA MESTRE, CHARLOTTE MERRILL

CLAIRE McLACHLAN, DANIEL CAIRNIE

DAVID LUKE, GRAEME EGLIN, GRAHAM PAGE

IAN COPELAND, JAMES FOSTER

JOHN PURDIE, MIKE FOYLE

NAVEEN MEDARAM, RICHARD COLLIS

SANGITA MISTRY, SIMON TINGELL

STEPHEN BENNETT, THIERRY MULLER

TIAGO SANTOS, WALTER GILBERT

Software Development ................................... IAN MASTERS, JAMES ROBERTS

JEFF CLIFFORD, JENNIFER WOOD

JON STROUD, MATTHIAS SCHARFENBERG

OLIVER JAMES, PETE HANSON

PETE KYME, STEVE LYNN

TED WAINE, TOM MAWBY

Visual Effects by ........................................... THE MOVING PICTURE COMPANY

Visual Effects Supervisor................................................................GREG BUTLER

Visual Effects Producer .................................................................. JASON HEAPY

Supervisors..............................................................................CHARLEY HENLEY

CLWYD EDWARDS, FERRAN DOMENECH

Visual Effects Production..........................MICHAEL ELSON, JULIA WIGGINTON

GEMMA JAMES, JANE ELLIS

KIRSTY WILSON, ALED ROBINSON

Lighting & Compositing Sequence Leads .............................. PETER SZEWCZYK

DOUG LARMOUR

STUART LASHLEY

Animators, Effects, Lighting & Matchmove Artists.............................. JASON WEN

BRUNO SIMOES, STEPHEN MURPHY

GEORGIOS CHEROUVIM, RICHARD GOMES

EVANGELOS CHRISTOPOULOS

SIMON LEWIS, DAVID STOPFORD

ALEXIS WAJSBROT, MARK NEWPORT

GREG KING, LUIS PAGES

KAREN SMITH, MICHAEL GAISER

NIC BIRMINGHAM, JOE EVELEIGH

TOM PHILLIPS, CHRISTIAN PARADIS

NAKIA McGLYNN, ROB ANDREWS

CHRISTOPHE DAMIANO, FLORIAN SALANOVA

MILES GLYN, DANIEL SMOLLAN

CLARE PAKEMAN, ALEC KNOX

GEORGE PLAKIDES, JON CAPLETON

CHRISTOPH GAUDL, PENG KE

Compositors & Rotoscoping.............................................. ARUNDI ASREGADOO

HENRY BADGETT, KIRSTY LAMB

RUPERT DAVIES, ALEX GUR

CHRISTINE WONG, MATTHEW PACKHAM

REUBEN BARKATAKI, SUZANNE JANDU

TONY YIU KEUNG MAN

MARCO FIORANI PARENZI

JEREMY HEY, HAYLEY COLLINS

QIAN HAN, TERANCE ALVARES

DAVE GRIFFITHS, JON VAN HOEY SMITH

LORAINE COOPER, IZET BUCO

JENNIFER HERBERT, PAUL KULIKOWSKI

STUART BULLEN, RICHARD BAILLIE

 

 

GRAHAM DAY

Modellers, Concept Illustrator, Character Rigging & Textures ........ TIM LEDBURY

OLIVIER PRON

ANGELA MAGRATH

LISA GONZALES

PATSY YIU PING YUEN

Software Development & Technical Support......................ANDERS LANGLANDS

DAVIDE PESARE, TOM COWLAND

HANNES RICKLEFS, MARK STREATFIELD

MARTIN PARSONS

Special Visual Effects & Animation

by

INDUSTRIAL LIGHT & MAGIC

a Lucasfilm Ltd. Company

San Francisco, California

Visual Effects Supervisor............................................................ TIM ALEXANDER

Visual Effects Animation Supervisor .......................................... STEVE RAWLINS

Visual Effects Producer ..................................................... STEPHANIE HORNISH

Digital Production Supervisor...................................................ROBERT WEAVER

Compositing Supervisor ............................................................SEAN MacKENZIE

Character Rigging Supervisor ............................................................ ERIC WONG

CG Modelling Supervisor.....................................................................KEN BRYAN

Matte Painter Supervisor............................................................GILES HANCOCK

CG Supervisor ............................................................................... JOHN WALKER

Lead Digital Artists......................................... JEFF SALTZMAN, LANCE BAETKE

JOHN HANSEN, MICHAEL BALOG

JOE CEBALLOS, LANA LAN

Digital Artists........................................................ISMAIL ACAR, MARK HOPKINS

ANDREW RUSSELL, STEVE APLIN

JEAN-CLAUDE LANGER

MISTY SEGURA, JILL BERGER

SEUNGHUN LEE, NELSON SEPULVEDA

MATHIEU BOUCHER, ALYSON MARKELL

RYAN SMITH, AMANDA BRAGGS

KEVIN MARTEL, JAMES SOUKUP

MATT BRUMIT, MICHELLE MOTTA

DAMIAN STEEL, PALLAVI DEVABHAKTUNI

STEVE NICHOLS, CHI CHUNG TSE

NATASHA DEVAUD, JOSHUA ONG

PASCALE VILLE, JEREMY GOLDMAN

HIROMI ONO, TIM WADDY

JEAN-DENIS HAAS, STEPHEN PARISH

BRUCE VECCHITTO, DON HATCH

SCOTT PARRISH, GREGORY WEINER

JULIAN HODGSON, JASON ROSSON

DEAN YURKE

Visual Effects Coordinator.....................................................BRIAN BARLETTANI

Visual Effects Editors........................................ JEROME BAKUM, TONY PITONE

Software and Technical Support .....................THOMAS CHAN, BRIAN McGRAW

RAYMOND CHOU, CHRISTINE MUNDAY

Visual Effects by.....................................................................FRAMESTORE-CFC

Visual Effects Supervisor...................................................................... CRAIG LYN

Visual Effects Producer ............................................................ AMY BERESFORD

CG Supervisor ..................................................................................... BEN WHITE

 

 

 

Animation Supervisor ................................................................... MAX SOLOMON

Compositing Supervisor ................................................................. ALEX PAYMAN

Visual Effects Coordinator........................................................ LUCINDA KEELER

Digital Artists..........................................................BEN AICKIN, SIMON J. ALLEN

ROB ALLMAN, OHKBA AMEZIANE-HASSANI

JAMES ATKINSON, MARK BAILEY

FELIX BALBAS, HARRY BARDAK

LAURENT BENHAMO, CARL BIANCO

ALESSANDRO BONORA

DAVID BOWMAN, ROSS BURGESS

STUART ELLIS, SOTOS GEORGHIOU

DANNY GEURTSEN, JULIEN GOLDSBROUGH

ALEX HESSLER, MARK HODGKINS

MARC JONES, EDMUND KOLLOEN

CHI KWONG LO, ZOE LAMAERA

JEREMY LAZARE, PATRICIA LLAGUNO

ARON MAKKAI, BARTH MAUNOURY

NATHAN McCONNEL, PHILIP MORRIS

ALESSANDRO MOZZATO, PAUL OAKLEY

CONOR O'MARA, ROBERT O'NEILL

OLEKSANDR PANASKEVYCH

ANTHONY PECK, JOHN PECK

CRAIG PENN, RICHARD POET

MATTHIEU POIREY, MELVYN POLAYAH

SEBASTIEN POTET, STEFAN PUTZ

SIRIO QUINTAVALLE

DENIS SCOLAN, JOHN SHARP

DAVID SHORT, RICHARD SLECHTA

UDO SMUTNY, JEAN-DAVID SOLON

WILSON STOCKMAN, KRISTI VALK

DANIEL WADE, RACHEL WARD

MATTHIAS ZELLER

Visual Effects by .............................................................. RISING SUN PICTURES

KAT SZUMINSKA, DAN BETHELL

DANIELA GIANGRANDE, FELIX CRAWSHAW

ALEX FRY, KEITH HERFT

KYLE GOODSELL, BEN TOOGOOD

CARSTEN KOLVE, NICK PITT-OWEN

KATIE GOODWIN, DANIEL THOMPSON

CAMERON SONERSON, ALEXIS HALL

ALEX KIM, STUART WILLIS

MARK WEBB, BECK VEITCH

Visual Effects by....................................................CINESITE (EUROPE) LIMITED

MICHAEL ILLINGWORTH

PAUL EDWARDS, JON NEILL

ALEX SMITH, KAREN WAND

GERT VAN DERMEERSCH

JIM PARSONS, RYAN CRONIN

CHRIS PETTS, GRAHAME CURTIS

GRANT CONNOR, CHAS CASH

TOM HOCKING, SANDRO HENRIQUES

EVAN DAVIES

Visual Effects by ......................................................................... BASEBLACK LTD

 

 

 

Visual Effects by .............................................................MACHINE EFFECTS LTD

 

Motion Control by .......................................................................THE VFX CO LTD

JAY MALLET, DANNY MURPHY, ELLIOT WYN JONES

Soundtrack Album on Warner Sunset Records/Warner Bros. Records Inc.

 

"Hedwig's Theme"

Written by John Williams

 

"Boys Will Be Boys"

Written by William Brown, James Gregory, Matthew Murphy & Samuel Preston

Performed by The Ordinary Boys

Courtesy of Warner Music U.K. Ltd./B-Unique Records

By Arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing

 

The Producers wish to thank the following for their assistance

 

The Casting Collective Ltd

Ann Koska/Sally King Ltd

The Italia Conti School

Centrestage School For Performing Arts

Redroofs Agency

Ravenscourt Theatre School

Jackie Palmer Agency

Young Un's Agency

Abbots Langley Young People's Drama Centre

Lyps Inc

The Staff at King's Cross Station & Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd

The Staff at Westminster Underground Station, Kate Reston at London Underground Film Office

The Staff of Great North Eastern Railway at Kings Cross Station

The Staff at Black Park

The Staff of Burnham Beeches

The Staff of Blenheim Palace Estate

West Coast Railway Company Ltd

 

Made on location in England & Scotland, & at Leavesden Studios, Hertfordshire, England.

 

American Humane Association monitored the animal action.

No animal was harmed in the making of the film. AHA01350 (logo)

 

Colour by TECHNICOLOR ®

 

Cameras and Lenses by JDC

 

Lee Lighting

 

KODAK Motion Picture Products

 

FUJIFILM Motion Picture Products

 

DOLBY Digital DTS Digital SDDS

 

Approved #43476

Motion Picture Association of America

 

 

 

Harry Potter characters, names and related indicia

are trademarks of and © Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Harry Potter publishing rights © J.K. Rowling

 

This motion picture

© 2007 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Screenplay

© 2007 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Original Score

© 2007 Warner-Barham Music, LLC

 

Heyday

 

Warner Bros. Distribution

 

 

 

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://montebubbles.net/blog-mt11/mt-tb.fcgi/19


Hosting by Yahoo!
[ Yahoo! ] options